Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Historically Black Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio, has received a $1.3 million gift from SodexoMagic, the university’s food service provider. The funds will be used for upgrades to the McPherson Memorial Stadium sports complex, including a weather-resistant synthetic field and track surface that will permit year-round collegiate and community activities. The stadium renovations will be completed this coming fall.

Historically Black Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri, has received a $1,185,117 grant from the United States Department of Agriculture to help build a multipurpose agriculture building on the university’s main campus. The new building will house the Cooperative Research and Extension program, state-of-the-art laboratories, and classroom and conference space.

The College of Engineering at historically Black Tennessee State University has received a $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation to support graduate students. The award, “Scholarship To Attract and Retain Students (STARS) in Graduate Engineering and Computer Science Program,” will provide 30 scholarships to students who are pursuing master’s degrees in engineering or computer science over five years. In addition to financial support, the program will include cohort-building activities, graduate student support services, seminars, summer internships, and mentorship.

Rider University in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, has received a $1 million gift to establish the Joan C. Mazzotti and Michael C. Kelly Endowed Scholarship, which will support Black and Latino students who are the first generation in their families to attend college. The couple hopes that their scholarship will relieve some of the financial pressures of college for its recipients, helping to close the gap in access to higher education.

The School of Education at historically Black Clark Atlanta University has received a $275,000 planning grant from the Rich Foundation to support the design and development of the Clark Atlanta University HBCU Executive Leadership Institute. The Institute is focused on the preparation and development of HBCU presidents and executive leaders. The goal is to develop a performance-based leadership preparation program that will engage aspiring and new HBCU presidents in an extended learning network that provides opportunities to practice and demonstrate proficiency in the HBCU working environment.

Historically Black Hampton University in Virginia has received a $2,000,000 contract from the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Health to assist in further developing research resources, such as MRI imaging capability, at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. The funds will support various projects focused on cancer imaging research and proton therapy.

Harford Community College in Bel Air, Maryland, has received a $97,118 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support student research and oral histories, curriculum development, community partnerships, and the development of digital material on Harford County’s 20th-century civil rights history. The project aims to deepen students’ understanding of literary works and local and national history and will broaden community awareness of the role of that Harford County played in the civil rights movement.

Related:


Leave a Reply



Due to incidents of abuse and harassment that have occurred in the past, JBHE will not publish telephone numbers or email addresses of individuals in this space. If you want to contact someone in a particular article, we suggest you contact them directly not in an open forum.