Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

money-bag-2Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Historically Black Virginia State University is one of seven universities in a consortium that is participating in a $47 million grant program supported by the Wallace Foundation to provide programs for training public school principals. Virginia State will receive $2,410,000 over the next years to fund the university’s role in the project.

City College of New York received a five-year, $5.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education for programs to increase the retention and graduation rates of students from underrepresented groups who are majoring in STEM disciplines.

ladejiosiasMorgan State University, the historically Black educational institution in Baltimore, received a two-year, $140,598 grant from the National Science Foundation to support the university’s Early STEM Engagement for Minority Males Through a Network of Minority Serving Institutions program. The program is under the direction of J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering. Dr. Ladeji-Osias is graduate of the University of Maryland, College Park and holds a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Rutgers University in New Jersey.

Jackson State University, the historically Black educational institution in Mississippi, received a five-year, $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation to support its CREST Center for Interdisciplinary Nanotoxicity. The research will study multifunctional nonparticles and their possible toxicity on the environment.

The College of Engineering at the University of Rhode Island received a $320,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for programs to recruit and retain students from underrepresented groups in STEM degree programs. The grant will help fund mentoring and scholarship programs for students in the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation.

Historically Black Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina is the recipient of a three-year, $400,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for programs to increase the number of students from underrepresented groups in graduate and professional programs in STEM fields. The funds will help establish an honors curriculum for undergraduate students in psychological sciences that will prepare students for graduate school.

Stanford University received a $1.5 million grant from the White House’s Corporation for National and Community Service to develop a framework for measuring and evaluating the success of social service programs designed to reduce poverty and inequality. The federal grant will be matched by additional funds from the Ballmer Group.

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