Yale University related articles

Yale Divinity School Commissions Painting of First African-American to Take Classes

Yale Divinity School Commissions Painting of First African-American to Take Classes

In the 1830s, Pennington, an escapee from slavery in Maryland and an aspiring minister, audited classes at the Yale Divinity School even though he was not allowed to officially enroll. He was permitted to sit in the back of the classroom and listen. He was not allowed to speak during classes or borrow books from the library.

Princeton University's Tera Hunter Wins Book Awards From the American Historical Association

Princeton University’s Tera Hunter Wins Book Awards From the American Historical Association

Tera W. Hunter, the Edwards Professor of History and professor of African American studies at Princeton University in New Jersey, has been awarded the Joan Kelly Memorial Prize in women’s history and/or feminist theory as well as the Littleton-Griswold Prize in U.S. law and society from the American Historical Association.

A New Study Finds Black Medical Students Face Bias During Residencies

A New Study Finds Black Medical Students Face Bias During Residencies

A survey of medical residents from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups found that these medical professionals experienced bias and microaggressions daily. They were also asked routinely to serve as “ambassadors” to resolve diversity issues.

New Research Institute at the University of Ghana to Be Named for Yale's Lamin Sanneh

New Research Institute at the University of Ghana to Be Named for Yale’s Lamin Sanneh

The new research center, which will be formally inaugurated in early 2020, will focus on designing research projects on various topics on religion and society in Africa. Professor Sanneh taught at the University of Ghana from 1975 to 1978.

New Book Provides Insight Into the Influence of an 18th-Century Slave Ship Woodcut Engraving

New Book Provides Insight Into the Influence of an 18th-Century Slave Ship Woodcut Engraving

The original wood engraving of a slave ship was created in 1788 by British abolitionists who intended to influence the legislators who regulated the slave trade. It was the first image to expose ordinary people to the barbarism of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

Yale University Scholar Urges a More Holistic Approach to Medical School Admissions

Yale University Scholar Urges a More Holistic Approach to Medical School Admissions

Inginia Genao, of the department of medicine at Yale University believes that the standardized Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) has created an unfair barrier for African Americans and other racial and ethnic minorities aspiring to start medical school.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

College of the Holy Cross Scholar Wins Book Award From the World History Association

College of the Holy Cross Scholar Wins Book Award From the World History Association

Lorelle Semley, an associate professor of history at th College of Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts, will share the Bentley Book Prize from the World History Association. Dr. Semley’s book, described by a reviewer as a “staple of reading lists for years to come,” explores the meaning of citizenship for French colonial subjects of African descent.

A Quartet of Black Scholars Who Have Been Appointed to Dean Positions

A Quartet of Black Scholars Who Have Been Appointed to Dean Positions

Newly appointed to dean posts are Terrence Blackman at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn, New York, Elaine M. O’Neal at North Carolina Central University, Marshall F. Stevenson Jr. at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and Larry Gladney at Yale University.

Johns Hopkins University Scholar Wins the $50,000 Hiett Prize in the Humanities

Johns Hopkins University Scholar Wins the $50,000 Hiett Prize in the Humanities

Chris Lebron, an associate professor of philosophy, is the winner of the award that recognizes “ascending” scholars whose are “devoted to the humanities and whose work shows extraordinary promise to have a significant impact on contemporary culture.”

In Memoriam: Marcellus Blount

In Memoriam: Marcellus Blount

Marcellus Blount was an associate professor of English and comparative literature at Columbia University in New York City. He was the former director of the Institute for Research in African American Studies and the former director of the graduate program in African American studies at Columbia.

Princeton's Tera Hunter Wins Book Award From the Organization of American Historians

Princeton’s Tera Hunter Wins Book Award From the Organization of American Historians

Tera W. Hunter, a professor of history and African American studies at Princeton University in New Jersey, has been awarded the Mary Nickliss Prize in U.S. Women’s and/or Gender History from the Organization of American Historians.

Yale Debuts New Scholarship Program for MBA Students From Africa

Yale Debuts New Scholarship Program for MBA Students From Africa

The Yale-African Impact Scholarships will be merit-based and supply at least one half of tuition and fees over the two years of the MBA program. Students must pledge to return to Africa for at least two years within two years after earning their MBA at Yale.

Henry Louis Gates Jr. Awarded the 2018 Creativity Laureate Prize

Henry Louis Gates Jr. Awarded the 2018 Creativity Laureate Prize

Henry Louis Gates Jr., the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard University, was honored recently at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Lena Hill Appointed Dean of the College at Washington and Lee University

Lena Hill Appointed Dean of the College at Washington and Lee University

Currently, Dr. Hill is senior associate to the president, interim chief diversity officer, and associate vice president at the University of Iowa. She joined the faculty at the University of Iowa in 2006 with a joint appointment in the departments of English and African American studies.

Study Finds Healthcare Clinicians Have Low Expectations for Their Black Patients

Study Finds Healthcare Clinicians Have Low Expectations for Their Black Patients

A new study finds that doctors and other healthcare providers rated White patients as significantly more likely to improve, more likely to adhere to recommended treatments, and be more personally responsible for their health than Black patients.

Four Black Scholars Taking on New Assignments at Colleges and Universities

Four Black Scholars Taking on New Assignments at Colleges and Universities

Taking on new roles are Kenneth Ataga at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Keith Reeves at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, Nadia Ward at Yale University in Connecticut, and Tyrone Howard at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Honors or Awards for a Trio of African American Scholars

Honors or Awards for a Trio of African American Scholars

The honorees are David Crockett of the School of Business at the University of South Carolina, Anjelica Gonzalez of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, and the late Carroll F.S. Hardy, a long-time administrator at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia.

New Black Issues in Philosophy Blog Now Available Online

New Black Issues in Philosophy Blog Now Available Online

A new blog series produced by an editorial team in the philosophy department at the University of Connecticut, is being featured on the website of the American Philosophical Association. Lewis Gordon, a professor of philosophy, is the executive editor.

Poet Elizabeth Alexander Named President of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Poet Elizabeth Alexander Named President of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Elizabeth Alexander, a professor at Columbia University who was selected to write a poem and read it at President Obama’s first inauguration in 2009, has been appointed president of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in New York.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Three Black Scholars Selected for Dean Positions at Major Universities

Three Black Scholars Selected for Dean Positions at Major Universities

Recently appointed to positions as deans are Jonathan Grady at the University of California, Merced, André-Denis Wright at Washington State University, and Riché Barnes at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.

Four African Americans Appointed to New Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Four African Americans Appointed to New Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Taking on new administrative duties are Thomas Easley at Yale University, Tami B. Simmons at Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, Bryan Samuel at Kansas State University, and Ann Penn at North Carolina Central University.

Four African American Women Taking on New Faculty Roles

Four African American Women Taking on New Faculty Roles

The four Black women appointed to new faculty positions are LaShanda Korley at the University of Delaware, Alison Curseen at Boston College, Sonya Clark at Virginia Commonwealth University, and Rizvana Bradley at Yale University.

Two African American Women Assuming New Faculty Positions

Two African American Women Assuming New Faculty Positions

Aimee Meredith Cox is a new associate professor of African American studies and an associate professor of anthropology at Yale University and Sami Schalk is a new assistant professor of gender and women’s studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Seven African Americans Appointed to New Faculty Posts

Seven African Americans Appointed to New Faculty Posts

Here is this week’s roundup of Black scholars who have been hired or assigned new duties at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

David A. Thomas Named the 12th President of Morehouse College

David A. Thomas Named the 12th President of Morehouse College

Dr. Thomas currently serves as the H. Naylor Fitzhugh Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. He is the former dean of the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University.

Americans Are Unaware of the Vast Racial Disparities in Economic Well-Being

Americans Are Unaware of the Vast Racial Disparities in Economic Well-Being

The researchers weighed participants’ estimates on several economic indicators against federal data and found that average estimates of current levels of racial economic equality exceeded reality by roughly 25 percent.

A Video Game Intervention Can Improve Sexual Health Knowledge Among Black Youth

A Video Game Intervention Can Improve Sexual Health Knowledge Among Black Youth

A video game developed by researchers at Yale University has proven to be an effective tool to improve health knowledge and reduce risky sexual behavior among Blacks and teenagers from other racial and ethnic groups.

Eight Black Faculty Members Who Have Been Given New Assignments

Eight Black Faculty Members Who Have Been Given New Assignments

Here is this week’s roundup of Black scholars who have been hired or assigned new duties at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

African American Quadruplets Enroll at Yale University

African American Quadruplets Enroll at Yale University

After fielding offers from a wide range of top colleges and universities, the Wade quadruplets of Liberty Township, Ohio, are all members of the Class of 2021 at Yale University.

James B. Hughes Jr. to Lead the Emory University School of Law

James B. Hughes Jr. to Lead the Emory University School of Law

Professor Hughes has been a member of the faculty at the law school since 1992. He also has been serving as associate dean for academic affairs. Earlier, he was a partner in the Atlanta law firm Trotter, Smith & Jacobs, where he practiced commercial real estate law.

Former Secretary of Education Is Now Teaching at the University of Maryland

Former Secretary of Education Is Now Teaching at the University of Maryland

John B. King Jr., the former secretary of the U.S. Department of Education, is a visiting professor in the College of Education at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is teaching a course on education policy.

The New Director of the Black Film Center/Archive at Indiana University

The New Director of the Black Film Center/Archive at Indiana University

Terri Francis joined the faculty at Indiana University in 2014. Earlier, she taught for nine years in the department of African American studies and the film and media studies program at Yale University. She is an expert on African American cinema and Jamaican film history.

Dartmouth's Rashauna Johnson Is a Finalist for the Frederick Douglass Book Prize

Dartmouth’s Rashauna Johnson Is a Finalist for the Frederick Douglass Book Prize

Three finalists have been named for the 19th annual Frederick Douglass Book Prize that recognizes the best book on slavery, resistance, and/or abolition published in the preceding year. Only one of the three finalists is African American.

First Black Woman Full Professor at the University of New Mexico Is Retiring

First Black Woman Full Professor at the University of New Mexico Is Retiring

Sherri Burr, Regents Professor at the University of New Mexico School of Law, is retiring. She has taught at the law school since 1988.