University of Pennsylvania related articles

Study Finds that Firearm Death Rates for Black Men in Some U.S. Cities Is Higher Than in War Zones

Study Finds that Firearm Death Rates for Black Men in Some U.S. Cities Is Higher Than in War Zones

A new study by researchers at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, and the University of Pennsylvania. finds that in some urban zip codes with large populations of young African Americans, the death rate from firearms was higher than for U.S. troops serving as ground troops in Iraq or Afghanistan.

In Memoriam: Charles Sommerville Harris, 1951- 2022

In Memoriam: Charles Sommerville Harris, 1951- 2022

Charles S. Harris was the former athletic director at the University of Pennsylvania, Arizona State University, and Averett University in Virginia, and the former commissioner of the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference. He was the first African American to serve as the athletic director at an Ivy League school.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Anita Allen Honored by the Hastings Center for Her Work in Bioethics

Anita Allen Honored by the Hastings Center for Her Work in Bioethics

Anita L. Allen is the Henry R. Silverman Professor of Law and professor of philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. Professor Allen was recognized for outstanding contributions to law and philosophy and to their practical applications in medicine, science, and public affairs.

Karlene Burrell-McRae Will Be the Next Dean of the Undergraduate College at Bryn Mawr

Karlene Burrell-McRae Will Be the Next Dean of the Undergraduate College at Bryn Mawr

Dr. Burrell-McRae is dean of the college at Colby College in Waterville, Maine. Previously, she was associate dean of students and executive director of the Center for Identity + Inclusion at the University of Chicago. Dr. Burrell-McRae will begin her new job at Bryn Mawr College on July 1, 2023.

Anthea Butler Is Honored by the American Academy of Religion

Anthea Butler Is Honored by the American Academy of Religion

Anthea Butler, Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought at the University of Pennsylvania, has received the 2022 Martin E. Marty Award from the American Academy of Religion. The Marty Award is given annually to an individual whose work helps advance the public understanding of religion.

Public School Students With Teachers Educated at HBCUs Do Better at Mathematics

Public School Students With Teachers Educated at HBCUs Do Better at Mathematics

A new study by Lavar Edmonds, a graduate student in the economics of education at Stanford University, finds that both Black and White HBCU-trained teachers in North Carolina Public schools are more effective with Black students in mathematics than their same-race, non-HBCU peers.

New Assignments for Five Black Faculty Members at Universities

New Assignments for Five Black Faculty Members at Universities

Taking on new roles or duties are Brian Burt at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Kimberley McKinson at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Amber Wiley at the Stuart Weitzman School of Design of the University of Pennsylvania, Eljenette West at the Mississippi University for Women, and Chelsea Mikael Frazier at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

A Trio of Black Scholars Who Are Taking on New Assignments

A Trio of Black Scholars Who Are Taking on New Assignments

Stephen Best is the new director of the Center for the Humanities at the University of California, Berkeley. Lakeyta Bonnette-Bailey will co-direct the Center for the Advancement of Students and Alumni at Georgia State University and Desmond Upton Patton was named to an endowed chair at the University of Pennsylvania.

HBCU Students to Participate in Medical Research Program at the University of Pennsylvania

HBCU Students to Participate in Medical Research Program at the University of Pennsylvania

The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania is expanding its Penn Access Summer Scholars Program to include students from five historically Black educational institutions. The selective program provides two summers of research for undergraduates with a goal of preparing them to matriculate into medical school.

How Racial Disparities in Income and Wealth Impact Educational Attainment in the United States

How Racial Disparities in Income and Wealth Impact Educational Attainment in the United States

A new study finds that the United States is falling behind many countries in the developed world in terms of higher education attainment. Much of the decline in educational attainment is attributed to unequal income and wealth which limits the ability of Blacks and other underrepresented groups to afford a college education.

Study Finds Telemedicine May Be Closing the Racial Gap in Primary Care Visits

Study Finds Telemedicine May Be Closing the Racial Gap in Primary Care Visits

A study by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that racial gaps in access disappeared for their patients during the initial phase of the pandemic. Once “normal” in-office appointments returned, the historic inequities stayed erased.

Helene D. Gayle Appointed the Eleventh President of Spelman College in Atlanta

Helene D. Gayle Appointed the Eleventh President of Spelman College in Atlanta

Dr. Gayle is currently president and CEO of The Chicago Community Trust, one of the nation’s oldest and largest community foundations. Earlier, she was CEO of the international humanitarian organization CARE and spent 20 years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Gregory Vincent Appointed President of Talladega College in Alabama

Gregory Vincent Appointed President of Talladega College in Alabama

Dr. Vincent is the former president of Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, New York Previously, he was the W.K. Kellogg Professor of Community College Leadership, professor of law, and vice president for diversity and community engagement at the University of Texas at Austin.

Steve Stoute Will Be the Twenty-Fifth President of Canisius College in Buffalo, New York

Steve Stoute Will Be the Twenty-Fifth President of Canisius College in Buffalo, New York

Stoute currently serves as vice president for strategic initiatives and chief of staff at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois. Born and raised in Trinidad and Tobago, Stoute immigrated to the United States in 2000 to attend Seton Hall University in New Jersey.

Mentioning Racial or Ethnic Identity Can Increase Chances of Obtaining Career Help

Mentioning Racial or Ethnic Identity Can Increase Chances of Obtaining Career Help

In a new study, researchers at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania found that people are significantly more likely to offer career help to people from underrepresented groups when help seekers mention their racial or ethnic identity in requests.

Five African American Faculty Members Who Have Been Appointed to New Positions

Five African American Faculty Members Who Have Been Appointed to New Positions

The five Black faculty members taking on new roles are Lance Freeman at the University of Pennsylvania, Aerial Ellis at North Carolina Central University, Salamishah Tillet at Rutgers University-Newark, Marcelle Haddix at Syracuse University in New York, and Charlene Gilbert at Ohio State University.

Telemedicine Could Be a Major Factor in Eliminating Racial Health Care Disparities

Telemedicine Could Be a Major Factor in Eliminating Racial Health Care Disparities

A new study from the Univerity of Pennsylvania medical school finds that attendance or “show” rates at follow-up appointments after hospitalization climbed among Black patients from 52 to 70 percent during the pandemic. The boost effectively eliminated the historical racial gap in show rates to follow-up appointments.

In Memoriam: Gwendolyn Gordon, 1980-2021

In Memoriam: Gwendolyn Gordon, 1980-2021

Dr. Gordon was an assistant professor in the department of legal studies and business ethics at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania with a secondary appointment in the School of Arts and Sciences’ department of anthropology. She held degrees from three different Ivy League universities.

Gene Wade to Lead the Propel Center, a Hub for HBCU Innovation and Learning

Gene Wade to Lead the Propel Center, a Hub for HBCU Innovation and Learning

Gene Wade most recently served as founder and CEO of Honors Pathway in Oakland, California, a social venture that enables low-income students to attend their first year of college at no cost while receiving over 500 hours of in-person coaching and mentoring.

In Memoriam: Carol Lani Guinier, 1950-2022

In Memoriam: Carol Lani Guinier, 1950-2022

Lani Guinier was the first woman of color to be a tenured professor at Harvard Law School. Earlier, she taught for 10 years at the law school of the University of Pennsylvania.

Three Black Faculty Members Who Are Taking on New Roles at Major Univerities

Three Black Faculty Members Who Are Taking on New Roles at Major Univerities

Renee Cunningham-Williams is the inaugural Watts Endowed Professor of Social Work at Arizona State University. Professor Martell Teasley is serving as interim senior vice president for academic affairs at the University of Utah and Kevin Johnson has been named the David L. Cohen University Professor at the University of Pennsylvania.

Colette Pierce Burnette Is Stepping Down as President of Huston-Tillotson University in Texas

Colette Pierce Burnette Is Stepping Down as President of Huston-Tillotson University in Texas

Dr. Pierce Burnette was named president in 2015. She is the first woman to hold the position since the 1952 merger of Tillotson College and Samuel Huston College. She will pass the baton of leadership on June 30.

Anita Allen Wins the APA's Highest Honor for Service to Philosophy

Anita Allen Wins the APA’s Highest Honor for Service to Philosophy

Professor Allen is an internationally renowned expert on philosophical dimensions of privacy and data protection law, ethics, bioethics, legal philosophy, women’s rights, and diversity in higher education. In 2018-19, she was the first Black woman to serve as president of the American Philosophical Association.

Roberta Waite Appointed Dean of the Georgetown University School of Nursing

Roberta Waite Appointed Dean of the Georgetown University School of Nursing

Dr. Waite is a professor of nursing and executive director of Drexel University’s Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services – a nurse-managed community-based organization that provides comprehensive care to thousands of individuals each year.

The Modern Language Association Announces the Winner of the William Sanders Scarborough Prize

The Modern Language Association Announces the Winner of the William Sanders Scarborough Prize

Joshua Bennett, professor of English and creative writing at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, was named the winner of the twentieth annual William Sanders Scarborough Prize from the Modern Language Association. The prize is awarded for an outstanding scholarly study of African American literature or culture.

Three Black Scholars Taking on New Faculty Assignments

Three Black Scholars Taking on New Faculty Assignments

Taking on new roles will be Sydney Freeman Jr. at the University of Pennsylvania, Regina Stevens-Truss at Kalamazoo College in Michigan, and Kwame Amoah at the University of Cincinnati.

New Positions or Assignments for a Quartet of Black Scholars

New Positions or Assignments for a Quartet of Black Scholars

Taking on new roles are Marcus L. Johnson at the Virginia Tech School of Education, Tracey Conti at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Anthea Butler at the University of Pennsylvania, and Michael Javen Fortner at Claremont McKenna College in California.

University of Pennsylvania's Elijah Anderson Wins the 2021 Stockholm Prize in Criminology

University of Pennsylvania’s Elijah Anderson Wins the 2021 Stockholm Prize in Criminology

The Stockholm Prize in Criminology is an international prize established under the aegis of the Swedish Ministry of Justice. First awarded in 2006, the prize recognizes outstanding achievements in criminological research or the application of research results to reduce crime and advance human rights.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Analysis of Consumer Reviews Uncovers Racism in Acute-Care Hospitals

Analysis of Consumer Reviews Uncovers Racism in Acute-Care Hospitals

An analysis of 90,786 online consumer reviews of U.S. acute-care hospitals published on Yelp, found that consumers experienced racism from a variety of actors, ranging from clinical staff, such as physicians and nurses, to other critical hospital personnel such as security officers and reception staff.

Mary Frances Berry Wins the Lewis Award for History and Social Justice

Mary Frances Berry Wins the Lewis Award for History and Social Justice

The Lewis Prize is offered annually to recognize a historian for leadership and sustained engagement at the intersection of historical work, public culture, and social justice. The prize is named in memory of John Lewis, the civil rights icon who represented Georgia in the United States House of Representatives for 34 years.

Olufunke Fontenot is the New Provost at Fort Valley State University in Georgia

Olufunke Fontenot is the New Provost at Fort Valley State University in Georgia

Before coming to Fort Valley State University in 2019, Dr. Fontenot served as the interim regional vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of South Florida – St. Petersburg. Dr. Fontenot also served as associate provost and associate vice president for academic affairs, and interim provost and vice president for academic affairs at Albany State University in Georgia.