University of Pennsylvania related articles

Berkeley's Nikki Jones Honored by the Western Society of Criminology

Berkeley’s Nikki Jones Honored by the Western Society of Criminology

Nikki Jones, a professor of African American studies at the University of California, Berkeley, has been awarded the 2020 W.E.B. DuBois Award from the Western Society of Criminology for her work in raising awareness for racial and ethic issues in criminology and criminal justice.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

The Racial Disparity in Fatal Police Shootings Has Not Improved in Five Years

The Racial Disparity in Fatal Police Shootings Has Not Improved in Five Years

Researchers at Yale University and the University of Pennsylvania analyzed more than 5,300 fatal police shooting from 2015 to May 2020. They found that Black people were killed at 2.6 times the rate of White people. Among unarmed victims, Black people were killed at three times the rate for Whites.

University of Pennsylvania's New Initiative to Preserve Black Heritage Sites

University of Pennsylvania’s New Initiative to Preserve Black Heritage Sites

The University of Pennsylvania’s Stuart Weitzman School of Design is launching a new initiative to advance the understanding and sustainable conservation of heritage sites relating to African American struggles for equality, from before the passage of the 14th Amendment to the present day.

College of Engineering at Cornell University Honors Its Former Dean, Lance R. Collins

College of Engineering at Cornell University Honors Its Former Dean, Lance R. Collins

Dr. Collins served as the Joseph Silbert Dean of Engineering at Cornell University from 2010 to 2020. On August 1, 2020, he became the inaugural vice president and executive director of Virginia Tech’s new Innovation Campus in Alexandria, Virginia.

The New President of St. Augustine's University in Raleigh, North Carolina

The New President of St. Augustine’s University in Raleigh, North Carolina

Dr. Irving Pressley McPhail was previously the sixth president and CEO at the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, founding chancellor at the Community College of Baltimore County, president of St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley, and president of Lemoyne-Owen College in Memphis.

Meharry Medical College and the University of Pennsylvania to Launch New MD/Ph.D. Program

Meharry Medical College and the University of Pennsylvania to Launch New MD/Ph.D. Program

The joint MD/PhD program will further both institutions’ efforts to bolster minority influence in healthcare and increase participation by members of underrepresented communities in health research. The program is expected to launch in 2021.

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for Eight African Americans

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for Eight African Americans

Here is this week’s roundup of African Americans who have been appointed to new administrative positions at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

A Handful of African American Scholars Taking on New Assignments

A Handful of African American Scholars Taking on New Assignments

Appointed to new positions are William H. Robinson at Vanderbilt University, Morgan D. Kirby at Texas Southern University, Shearon Roberts at Xavier University of Louisiana, Artel Great at San Francisco State University, and Herman Beavers at the University of Pennsylvania.

New Report Documents Decreasing College Opportunities for Low-Income Americans

New Report Documents Decreasing College Opportunities for Low-Income Americans

A new report from the Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education and the University of Pennsylvania’s Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy, shows how the pandemic will adversely affect the higher education opportunities of Americans from low-income families.

Ivy Ruth Taylor to Be the First Woman President of Rust College in Holly Springs, Mississippi

Ivy Ruth Taylor to Be the First Woman President of Rust College in Holly Springs, Mississippi

Dr. Taylor is the former mayor of San Antonio, Texas. She spent six years as a lecturer in public administration at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She also worked at a nonprofit affordable housing agency and served multiple terms as a city councilmember prior to her term as mayor.

Erika James to Lead the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania

Erika James to Lead the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania

When she takes office on July 1, Erika James will be the first woman and the first African American to lead the prestigious business school since its founding in 1881. Since 2014, Dr. James has been serving as dean of the Goizueta Business School at Emory University in Atlanta.

Black Enrollments at Ivy League Law Schools

Black Enrollments at Ivy League Law Schools

Black students make up at least 11 percent of total enrollments at all five Ivy League law schools. Leading the group is Columbia University in New York where there are 39 Black students out of a total enrollment of 124. Thus, Blacks are 31.2 percent of the total enrollments.

Nina Gilbert to Direct the Center for Excellence in Education at Morehouse College in Atlanta

Nina Gilbert to Direct the Center for Excellence in Education at Morehouse College in Atlanta

Dr. Gilbert is the former senior advisor on education reform for the Morehouse Research Institute. She has also served as an adjunct professor at Morehouse College and at the Tift College of Education at Mercer University in Macon, Georgia.

New Scholarships at the University of Pennsylvania Seek to Boost Diversity in City Planning

New Scholarships at the University of Pennsylvania Seek to Boost Diversity in City Planning

The department of city and regional planning in the Weitzman School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania has established the Moelis Scholars program that is open to African American and Latinx students who are thinking about pursuing careers in housing and community and economic development.

Four African Americans Who Have Been Appointed to New Administrative Posts at Universities

Four African Americans Who Have Been Appointed to New Administrative Posts at Universities

Taking on new administrative positions in higher education are Bill Means at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, Darrell B. McMillon at Delaware State University, Amber Williams at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and Malik Washington at the University of Pennsylvania.

John Morrow Is the First African American to Win Prestigious Award for Military Writing

John Morrow Is the First African American to Win Prestigious Award for Military Writing

John H. Morrow, Jr., professor of history at the University of Georgia, is the 13th recipient of the Pritzker Military Museum & Library Literature Award for Lifetime Achievement in Military Writing. The award includes a gold medallion and a $100,000 honorarium.

Black Children Are Less Likely to Receive Bystander CPR Than White Children After Cardiac Arrest

Black Children Are Less Likely to Receive Bystander CPR Than White Children After Cardiac Arrest

The results found that a total of 3,399 children, or 48 percent of the total number of recorded cardiac arrests, received bystander CPR. When compared to White children, bystander CPR was 41 percent less likely for Black youth.

Report Reveals Underrepresentation of Students from Minority Serving Institutions in Study Abroad

Report Reveals Underrepresentation of Students from Minority Serving Institutions in Study Abroad

The report offers insight into the challenges facing students who want to study abroad including barriers of cost, culture, and curriculum.

In Memoriam: Adelaide Cromwell, 1919-2019

In Memoriam: Adelaide Cromwell, 1919-2019

Dr. Cromwell first joined the Boston University faculty in 1951. Two years later, she co-founded the university’s African Studies Center. In 1969, she founded the university’s African American studies program, the country’s second such program and the first to offer a graduate degree in the subject.

One-Time Diversity Training Programs Are Ineffective in Changing Behavior, Study Finds

One-Time Diversity Training Programs Are Ineffective in Changing Behavior, Study Finds

The researchers found that although the after-training survey results were positive, the participants behavior in the following months did not change very much, particularly among men and White people. Additionally, very few senior level executives were willing to participate in the training.

African Americans Accepted Into the Class of 2023 at High-Ranking Colleges and Universities

African Americans Accepted Into the Class of 2023 at High-Ranking Colleges and Universities

Recently, most of the nation’s highest-ranked colleges and universities informed applicants if they had been accepted for admission into the Class of 2023. Some revealed the racial/ethnic breakdown of their admitted students.

Shaun Harper Chosen to Lead the American Educational Research Association

Shaun Harper Chosen to Lead the American Educational Research Association

Currently, Dr. Harper serves as a Provost Professor in the Rossier School of Education and Marshall School of Business, the Clifford and Betty Allen Chair in Urban Leadership, and the founder and executive director of the Race and Equity Center at the University of Southern California.

African-American Burial Ground Found Underneath University of Pennsylvania Property

African-American Burial Ground Found Underneath University of Pennsylvania Property

The university learned last year that the property had previously been used as a burial ground. In response, the institution issued two sequences of field testing, which has recently conclusively confirmed the presence of graves.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Seven Black Scholars in the U.S. From Foreign Nations Have Been Awarded Rhodes Scholarships

Seven Black Scholars in the U.S. From Foreign Nations Have Been Awarded Rhodes Scholarships

There are 16 international Rhodes Scholars who are attending or have recently graduated from American colleges and universities. Out of the 16 international scholars at American educational institutions who have been awarded Rhodes Scholarships, seven are Black.

Black Teens See a Lot of Risky Content Online, But Few Post About It

Black Teens See a Lot of Risky Content Online, But Few Post About It

A study led by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, has found that Black and Hispanic teens observe a great deal of references to violent and risky behavior on social media. But fewer than one-fifth said they personally had posted such content.

Danielle Laraque-Arena Named Scholar-in-Residence at New York Academy of Medicine

Danielle Laraque-Arena Named Scholar-in-Residence at New York Academy of Medicine

Most recently, Dr. Laraque-Arena served as President and Health System CEO of the State University of New York Upstate Medical University. She has held academic appointments at the University of Pennsylvania, Columbia University, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Kimberly Mutcherson Is the First African-American Law Dean at Rutgers University in New Jersey

Kimberly Mutcherson Is the First African-American Law Dean at Rutgers University in New Jersey

Kimberly Mutcherson has been named co-dean of the Rutgers Law School in Camden. Her appointment makes her the first woman, the first African American, and the first LGBT law dean at Rutgers University.

Rutgers University to Launch the Samuel D. Proctor Institute for Leadership, Equity, and Justice

Rutgers University to Launch the Samuel D. Proctor Institute for Leadership, Equity, and Justice

Samuel DeWitt Proctor was a Rutgers faculty member for 15 years. He served as the first Martin Luther King Jr. Chair and visiting professor in the Department of Africana Studies. Proctor was the first Black faculty member at Rutgers to have an endowed professorship named in his honor.

Report Finds Persisting Racial Shortfall in the Public School Workforce

Report Finds Persisting Racial Shortfall in the Public School Workforce

In the 2015-2016 academic year, 19.9 percent of public elementary and secondary teachers were minorities, but 51 percent of all public school students were members of racial or ethnic minority groups.

Three African Americans Named Rhodes Scholars

Three African Americans Named Rhodes Scholars

A year ago, 10 African-Americans were among the 32 winners of Rhodes Scholarships for Americans. This was the most ever elected in a single U.S. Rhodes class. This year, there are three African Americans among the 32 Rhodes Scholars.

Danielle Laraque-Arena Will Step Down As President of the Upstate Medical University

Danielle Laraque-Arena Will Step Down As President of the Upstate Medical University

Danielle Laraque-Arena, the first woman president of the Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, New York, has announced she is stepping down, effective at the end of this semester. She will return to a full-time faculty position in June 2019.

Northeastern University Team Digs Into Jim Crow-Era Cold Case Murders

Northeastern University Team Digs Into Jim Crow-Era Cold Case Murders

All six victims were murdered by White men who were later not prosecuted for their crimes. Three of the Black men were killed by police officers.

University of Pennsylvania Research Uncovers Its Early Ties to Slavery

University of Pennsylvania Research Uncovers Its Early Ties to Slavery

Research has shown that no fewer than 75 of the university’s early trustees owned at least one enslaved person. The labor of enslaved people was used to support and care for Penn faculty and students.

Racial Stereotypes Influence Teacher Perceptions of Parental Involvement in Children's Education

Racial Stereotypes Influence Teacher Perceptions of Parental Involvement in Children’s Education

A new study finds that school teachers believe that mothers and fathers of immigrant or minority students are less involved in their children’s education. The authors believe that such perspectives hamper the academic trajectory of those students.