University of California Berkeley related articles

Katherine Clay Bassard Will Be the Next Provost at Rhodes College in Memphis

Katherine Clay Bassard Will Be the Next Provost at Rhodes College in Memphis

Dr. Bassard currently serves as a professor of English and interim senior associate dean for faculty affairs in the College of Humanities and Sciences at Virginia Commonwealth University. Earlier, she was senior vice provost for faculty affairs at VCU.

Four African American Academics In This Year's Class of MacArthur Fellows

Four African American Academics In This Year’s Class of MacArthur Fellows

The Chicago-based MacArthur Foundation has announced the selection of 26 individuals in this year’s class of MacArthur Fellows. This year, five of the 26 MacArthur Fellows are Black. Four have current ties to academia.

In Memoriam: David L. Ferguson, 1949-2019

In Memoriam: David L. Ferguson, 1949-2019

David L. Ferguson was department chair and Distinguished Service Professor of Technology and Society at Stony Brook University in New York. He had taught at the university since 1981.

Three Black Scholars Who Have Been Appointed to Positions as Deans

Three Black Scholars Who Have Been Appointed to Positions as Deans

Akinlolu O. Ojo was named executive dean of the University of Kansas School of Medicine. Robin Renee Davis will be dean of the Sydney Lewis School of Business at Virginia Union University and Linda Burton has been named dean of the School of Social Welfare at the University of California, Berkeley.

In Memoriam: Walter Robinson, 1953-2019

In Memoriam: Walter Robinson, 1953-2019

Walter Robinson had retired from his position as associate vice chancellor of enrollment management at the University of California, Davis last September. He had a career in admissions and enrollment management in higher education that spanned nearly 40 years.

Study Finds Historically Redlined Communities Have Higher Rates of Asthma

Study Finds Historically Redlined Communities Have Higher Rates of Asthma

The results found that residents of redlined neighborhoods visited the emergency room for asthma-related complaints 2.4 times more often than residents of green neighborhoods. Measures of diesel particulate matter in the air also averaged nearly twice as high in redlined neighborhoods compared to green neighborhoods.

University of Maryland Baltimore County to Expand Meyerhoff Scholars Program to California

University of Maryland Baltimore County to Expand Meyerhoff Scholars Program to California

The Meyerhoff Scholars program is recognized as one of the most effective models in the country to help inspire, recruit, and retain underrepresented students pursuing undergraduate and graduate degrees in STEM disciplines.

Berkeley Study Finds Increasing Racial Segregation in Bay Area Housing

Berkeley Study Finds Increasing Racial Segregation in Bay Area Housing

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley found large increases in the number of low-income people of color living in newly segregated and higher-poverty areas over the 15-year period at the beginning of this century.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

University Study Finds Racial Disparity in Solar Panel Installations

University Study Finds Racial Disparity in Solar Panel Installations

A new study authored by researchers at Tufts University in Massachusetts and the University of California, Berkeley, has found that the deployment of solar panels has predominately occurred in White neighborhoods, even after controlling for household income and levels of home ownership.

Study Finds That Institutional Support Is Essential for Black Ph.D. Students in STEM Fields to Succeed

Study Finds That Institutional Support Is Essential for Black Ph.D. Students in STEM Fields to Succeed

The research team investigated why Black graduate students were nearly three times less likely to have published a paper in an academic journal than White, Asian, and graduate students from other underrepresented groups.

Less-Educated Black Women May Face Greater Risk of Chronic Diseases Due to Discrimination

Less-Educated Black Women May Face Greater Risk of Chronic Diseases Due to Discrimination

A new study from the University of California, Berkeley has found that less-educated African-American women who report experiencing high levels of racial discrimination may face greater risk of developing chronic diseases.

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for a Quartet of Black Americans

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for a Quartet of Black Americans

Appointed to new administrative positions are Ronald Howell at Virginia State University, Olufemi Ogundele at the University of California, Berkeley, Dejah Carter at Stanford University, and Bryan Terry at Arkansas State University.

Neuroscientists Create a Computational Model to Predict Discrimination Based on Stereotypes

Neuroscientists Create a Computational Model to Predict Discrimination Based on Stereotypes

A team of researchers led by neuroscience scholars at the University of California, Berkeley has built a computational model that can predict the degree to which we discriminate against one another based on our stereotypes of groups according to their perceived warmth and competence.

NBA Legend Isiah Thomas Seeks to Increase Celebrities' Support of HBCUs

NBA Legend Isiah Thomas Seeks to Increase Celebrities’ Support of HBCUs

According to a statement released by Florida Memorial University, the new program is “intended to inspire successful athletes, entertainers and other influential partners to re-commit, embrace and support historically Black colleges and universities.”

How Greater Diversity in the Physician Workforce Would Reduce Racial Health Disparities

How Greater Diversity in the Physician Workforce Would Reduce Racial Health Disparities

After conducting a randomized clinical trial among 1,300 Black men in Oakland, the researchers found that the men sought more preventive services after they were randomly seen by Black doctors for a free health-care screening compared to non-Black doctors.

Pomona College in California Appoints Avis Hinkson as Dean of Students

Pomona College in California Appoints Avis Hinkson as Dean of Students

Dr. Hinkson has been serving as dean of Barnard College in New York City. Earlier in her career, Dr. Hinkson was associate dean of admissions at Pomona College. She will begin her new job at Pomona College in Claremont, California, on August 1.

Racial Status Threat May Produce Backlash Against Federal Assistance Programs

Racial Status Threat May Produce Backlash Against Federal Assistance Programs

A new study finds that when White Americans are made aware that their demographic group will no longer be majority of the population of the United States, they become more resentful of minorities and are less likely to support federal entitlement programs like welfare.

University of California, Berkeley Acquires Its First Archival Collection of a Black Photographer

University of California, Berkeley Acquires Its First Archival Collection of a Black Photographer

The Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley has acquired more than 5,000 negatives and photographic prints from 91-year-old photographer David Johnson. He was the first African American student of legendary photographer Ansel Adams.

In Memoriam: Olly W. Wilson, 1937-2018

In Memoriam: Olly W. Wilson, 1937-2018

After teaching at Florida A&M University and the Oberlin Conservatory of Music, Dr. Wilson joined the music department faculty at the University of California, Berkeley in 1970. He retired from teaching in 2002.

Princeton University's Plan to Deal With the Legacy of Woodrow Wilson

Princeton University’s Plan to Deal With the Legacy of Woodrow Wilson

At Princeton, Woodrow Wilson had refused to consider the admission of Black students. As President of the United States, he racially segregated the federal government workforce and appointed White supremacists to his cabinet.

Berkeley's First Tenured Black Scholar Has a Building Named in His Honor

Berkeley’s First Tenured Black Scholar Has a Building Named in His Honor

Dr. David Blackwell, an accomplished statistician, joined the mathematics department at Berkeley in 1954 and stayed on the faculty there until retiring in 1988. In 1965, he was the first African American to be inducted into the National Academy of Sciences.

Study by Ohio State University Economists Shows Black Politicians Matter

Study by Ohio State University Economists Shows Black Politicians Matter

A new National Bureau of Economic Research working paper by Trevon Logan, a professor of economics at Ohio State University, finds that when Blacks hold political power their economic status rises. But when they lose political power, their economic fortunes dwindle.

Study Finds Widespread Discrimination Against Older Black Adults With Chronic Disease

Study Finds Widespread Discrimination Against Older Black Adults With Chronic Disease

A new study finds that one of five elderly patients with chronic disease reported that they had experienced discrimination by health care providers. Blacks reported higher rates of discrimination but the racial gap has narrowed.

In Memoriam: Todd Jason McCallum

In Memoriam: Todd Jason McCallum

Todd McCallum was an associate professor in the department of psychological sciences at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. He joined the faculty there in 2002 and was promoted to associate professor in 2007.

In Memoriam: Jospeh Muriuki Wahome, 1962-2017

In Memoriam: Jospeh Muriuki Wahome, 1962-2017

A native of Kenya, Joseph M. Wahome was a former associate professor of biology and chair of the department of natural sciences and environmental health at Mississippi Valley State University.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Black Scholar at the California College of the Arts Returning to Her Roots

Black Scholar at the California College of the Arts Returning to Her Roots

After serving on the faculty at the California College of the Arts for nearly a quarter century, Professor Opal Palmer Adisa is returning to her native Jamaica to serve as the director of the Institute for Gender and Development Studies at the University of the West Indies.

Ernest Morrell Appointed to an Endowed Chair at the University of Notre Dame

Ernest Morrell Appointed to an Endowed Chair at the University of Notre Dame

Professor Morrell will also serve as the inaugural director of the Center for Literacy Education in the university’s Institute for Educational Initiatives. He will hold joint appointments in the Department of English and the Department of Africana Studies.

Sabrina Strings Wins a Hellman Fellowship to Complete a Book on Fat Stigma

Sabrina Strings Wins a Hellman Fellowship to Complete a Book on Fat Stigma

Sabrina Strings is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine. She will use the fellowship to complete work on her book, Thin, White & Saved: Fat Stigma and the Fear of the Big Black Body.

Jackson State University Partners With the School of Pharmacy at Ole Miss

Jackson State University Partners With the School of Pharmacy at Ole Miss

Under the agreement, pre-pharmacy students at Jackson State University who meet certain qualifications will get preferred admission status at the School of Pharmacy at the University of Mississippi.

Berkeley Psychologist Looks to End Bias in School Discipline

Berkeley Psychologist Looks to End Bias in School Discipline

Jason Okonofua, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley has developed an online intervention program that allows school teachers to examine their implicit racial bias before handing out punishment for students in need of discipline.

The Next Dean of the School of Engineering at Rice University in Houston, Texas

The Next Dean of the School of Engineering at Rice University in Houston, Texas

Currently, Dr. Reginald DesRoches is the chair of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. A native of Haiti, he joined the faculty at Georgia Tech in 1998 and was promoted to full professor in 2008.

Gary May Appointed the Seventh Chancellor of the University of California, Davis

Gary May Appointed the Seventh Chancellor of the University of California, Davis

Dr. May currently serves as dean of the College of Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. He was appointed to this post in July 2011. He also is a professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech.

Kimberly White-Smith Is the New Leader of the College of Education at the University of La Verne

Kimberly White-Smith Is the New Leader of the College of Education at the University of La Verne

Before coming to the University of La Verne, Dr. White-Smith was professor of education, associate dean of the College of Educational Studies and director of the Donna Ford Attallah Educator Development Academy at Chapman University in Orange, California.

University Researchers Make a Breakthrough in Finding a Cure for Sickle Cell Disease

University Researchers Make a Breakthrough in Finding a Cure for Sickle Cell Disease

Scientists have used gene editing to fix the mutated gene responsible for the disease in stem cells from the blood of affected patients. In tests with mice, the genetically engineered stem cells remained for at least four months after transplantation.