UCLA related articles

In Memoriam: Albert James Williams-Myers, 1939-2021

In Memoriam: Albert James Williams-Myers, 1939-2021

A.J. William-Myers, professor emerita of African American studies at the State University of New York-New Paltz, died at his home in New Paltz on July 12. He was 82 years old.

The Percentage of All Doctors Who Are Black Men Has Made No Progress in 80 Years

The Percentage of All Doctors Who Are Black Men Has Made No Progress in 80 Years

In 1940, 2.8 percent of physicians in the United States were Black. Almost all were men. By 2018, 5.4 percent of U.S. physicians were Black — 2.6 percent were Black men. Thus, the percentage of all physicians who were Black men made no progress in nearly 80 years.

Lolita Buckner Inniss Will Be the Next Dean of the University of Colorado School of Law

Lolita Buckner Inniss Will Be the Next Dean of the University of Colorado School of Law

Dr. Innis has been serving as senior associate dean for academic affairs and professor of law, University Distinguished Professor, and the inaugural Robert G. Storey Distinguished Faculty Fellow at the Dedman School of Law at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. She will begin her duties as dean on July 1.

UCLA Analysis Finds Another Racial Health Disparity During the COVID-19 Pandemic

UCLA Analysis Finds Another Racial Health Disparity During the COVID-19 Pandemic

The study found that during the pandemic, African Americans may have had worse access than Whites to outpatient care and thus were less likely to avoid hospitalizations for non-COVID-19–related conditions. This increased African Americans’ risk of hospital-acquired infections, the researchers say.

Black Women Who "Hunker Down" in High Violence Areas Have Altered Genes in Immune Cells

Black Women Who “Hunker Down” in High Violence Areas Have Altered Genes in Immune Cells

The chronic stress of living in neighborhoods with high rates of violence and poverty alters gene activity in immune cells, according to a new study of low-income single Black mothers on the South Side of Chicago conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, the University of Kentucky and the University of California, Los Angeles.

In Memoriam: Walter Edward Williams, 1936-2020

In Memoriam: Walter Edward Williams, 1936-2020

Walter E. Williams was the conservative economist, syndicated newspaper columnist, and long-time professor at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. He died on December 2, shortly after teaching his last class.

UCLA Debuts an Online Interactive Hate Crime Map

UCLA Debuts an Online Interactive Hate Crime Map

The new website is intended to supplement reporting on such crimes, both by inviting submissions from people who have experienced such crimes and by tracking published accounts from news sources.

UCLA Study Finds Progress in Front - But Not Behind - the Camera in Hollywood

UCLA Study Finds Progress in Front – But Not Behind – the Camera in Hollywood

A new study by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles finds that when it comes to racial diversity in television industry acting roles, the playing field continues to level for minorities, but there’s stubborn structural gridlock at the highest ranks and behind the camera.

Northwestern University Scholar Finds That Whites Underestimate the Extent of Racial Inequality

Northwestern University Scholar Finds That Whites Underestimate the Extent of Racial Inequality

A new study by Ivuoma Ngozi Onyeador, an assistant professor at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management, finds that White Americans have a far more optimistic view of the racial progress that has been made since the 1960s than is actually the case.

Five African Americans Who Are Assuming New Administrative Duties in Higher Education

Five African Americans Who Are Assuming New Administrative Duties in Higher Education

Taking on new administrative posts are Marita Gilbert at Michigan State University, Dustin Fulton at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Valerie Fields at the University of Louisiana-Monroe, Anna Spain Bradley at the University of California, Los Angeles, and Cheldon Williams at West Virginia University.

Tracy Johnson Named Dean of the Division of Life Sciences at UCLA

Tracy Johnson Named Dean of the Division of Life Sciences at UCLA

Dr. Johnson is a professor of molecular, cell, and developmental biology and holder of the Keith and Cecilia Terasaki Presidential Endowed Chair at UCLA. She joined the faculty in 2013 and has served as associate dean for inclusive excellence in the division of life sciences since January 2015.

New University Administrative Posts for Six African Americans

New University Administrative Posts for Six African Americans

Taking on new administrative roles are Tracey Ford at the North Carolina School of the Arts, Sean T. Bennett at Salem State University, Samara Hough at the University of Michigan-Flint, Martin Jarmond at UCLA, Claudia Donald at the University of Massachusetts, and Jasmon Sessoms at Fayetteville State University.

Na'ilah Suad Nasir Elected to Lead the American Educational Research Association

Na’ilah Suad Nasir Elected to Lead the American Educational Research Association

Since 2017, Dr. Nasir has been president of the Spencer Foundation, which has been a leading funder of education research since 1971. Earlier, she held the Birgeneau Chair in Educational Disparities and was vice-chancellor of equity and inclusion at the University of California, Berkeley.

Heather Parker Appointed Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at St. Leo University in Florida

Heather Parker Appointed Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at St. Leo University in Florida

Dr. Parker joined the Saint Leo faculty in August 2006 as an assistant professor of history and advanced through the teaching ranks to a full professorship. Her research has concentrated on interethnic religious interaction and the political implications of these relationships in Florida.

Brown University Dean Andrew Campbell to Lead the Council of Graduate Schools

Brown University Dean Andrew Campbell to Lead the Council of Graduate Schools

Andrew G. Campbell is the dean of the Graduate School at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. Also, Dr. Campbell is a professor of medical science whose research focuses on microbial diseases. He has taught at Brown University since 1994.

Four African American Academics In This Year's Class of MacArthur Fellows

Four African American Academics In This Year’s Class of MacArthur Fellows

The Chicago-based MacArthur Foundation has announced the selection of 26 individuals in this year’s class of MacArthur Fellows. This year, five of the 26 MacArthur Fellows are Black. Four have current ties to academia.

Dwight A. McBride Named President of The New School in New York City

Dwight A. McBride Named President of The New School in New York City

Since 2017, Dr. McBride has served as provost and executive vice president of academic affairs at Emory University in Atlanta. Before going to Emory, Dr. McBride was the Daniel Hale Williams Professor of African American studies, English, and Performance Studies at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.

New Report Focuses on Disparities in School Discipline Faced by Black Girls

New Report Focuses on Disparities in School Discipline Faced by Black Girls

A new report from the African American Policy Forum and the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies at Columbia Law School finds that Black girls face a statistically greater chance of suspension and expulsion compared to other students of the same gender.

In Memoriam: David L. Ferguson, 1949-2019

In Memoriam: David L. Ferguson, 1949-2019

David L. Ferguson was department chair and Distinguished Service Professor of Technology and Society at Stony Brook University in New York. He had taught at the university since 1981.

A. Eugene Washington Gets a Vote of Confidence at Duke University

A. Eugene Washington Gets a Vote of Confidence at Duke University

A. Eugene Washington, chancellor for health affairs and president and CEO of the Duke University Health System, has been reappointed to a second five-year term beginning July 1, 2020. He came to Duke in 2015 after serving as dean of the medical school at the University of California, Los Angeles.

New UCLA Online Video Archive Devoted to Former Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley

New UCLA Online Video Archive Devoted to Former Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley

The archive contains footage from the library of KTLA-TV in Los Angeles. It includes unedited news segments, never-before-seen footage, and news stories not seen publicly since originally broadcast.

Birmingham Civil Rights Institute Revokes Honor for Professor Angela Davis

Birmingham Civil Rights Institute Revokes Honor for Professor Angela Davis

In September of 2018, the ‪Birmingham Civil Rights Institute selected Angela Davis to receive the Fred Shuttlesworth Human Rights Award at its annual gala in February. That decision has now been changed and the event has been cancelled. Dr. Davis believes her support of Palestinian rights prompted the decision.

A Strong Vote of Confidence for Swarthmore College President Valerie Smith

A Strong Vote of Confidence for Swarthmore College President Valerie Smith

Valerie Smith, who took office as the 15th president of highly rated Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania on July 1, 2015, has had her contract extended through 2025. Before becoming president of Swarthmore College, Dr. Smith was dean of the college and the Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature at Princeton University.

Danielle Laraque-Arena Will Step Down As President of the Upstate Medical University

Danielle Laraque-Arena Will Step Down As President of the Upstate Medical University

Danielle Laraque-Arena, the first woman president of the Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, New York, has announced she is stepping down, effective at the end of this semester. She will return to a full-time faculty position in June 2019.

The Racial Wealth Gap in Los Angeles Has Widened Since the 1965 Watts Riots

The Racial Wealth Gap in Los Angeles Has Widened Since the 1965 Watts Riots

A new study by scholars at Duke University, the University of California Los Angeles, and the New School, has found that the wealth gap has been severely overlooked as a major factor in overall inequality since the 1965 Watts riots in Los Angeles.

Study Finds College Recruiters Tend to Visit Wealthier, Predominantly White High Schools

Study Finds College Recruiters Tend to Visit Wealthier, Predominantly White High Schools

A new study by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles and the University of Arizona finds that American colleges and universities tend to spend their recruiting resources at high schools attended by children of high-income White families.

Linda Oubré Selected as the Fifteenth President of Whittier College in California

Linda Oubré Selected as the Fifteenth President of Whittier College in California

For the past six years, Dr. Oubré has served as dean of the College of Business at San Francisco State University. Earlier, Dr. Oubré was executive director of corporate relations and business development, and chief diversity officer for the Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Davis.

Four Black Scholars Taking on New Assignments at Colleges and Universities

Four Black Scholars Taking on New Assignments at Colleges and Universities

Taking on new roles are Kenneth Ataga at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Keith Reeves at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, Nadia Ward at Yale University in Connecticut, and Tyrone Howard at the University of California, Los Angeles.

UCLA Reports Examines Racial Diversity in Hollywood

UCLA Reports Examines Racial Diversity in Hollywood

The report found that films with casts made up of 21 to 30 percent minority actors enjoyed the highest median global box office ticket sales and the highest median return on investment. Films with the most racially homogenous casts were the poorest financial performers.

Ladee Hubbard to Receive the Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence

Ladee Hubbard to Receive the Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence

Ladee Hubbard, who teaches in the Africana studies program at Tulane University in New Orleans, is being honored for her debut novel The Talented Ribkins, the story of an African American family whose members have unique superpowers.

UCLA Study Documents the Low Representation of Black Writers in Television

UCLA Study Documents the Low Representation of Black Writers in Television

The reported authored by Darnell Hunt, dean of social sciences at UCLA, found that two-thirds of television shows had no Black writers at all, and another 17 percent of shows had just one Black writer.

In Memoriam: Gloria Johnson-Powell, 1936-2017

In Memoriam: Gloria Johnson-Powell, 1936-2017

Dr. Gloria Johnson-Powell considered dropping out of Meharry Medical College to devote more time to civil rights activism. However, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. urged her to complete her studies. She did.

Racial Disparities in College Enrollment and Retention in Los Angeles

Racial Disparities in College Enrollment and Retention in Los Angeles

A new study examines college enrollment and retention rates of graduates of the Los Angeles Unified School District. The data shows a high level of participation in college but low levels of successful completion.

Study Finds Record Labels Glorify Antisocial Themes But Consumers Prefer Prosocial Music

Study Finds Record Labels Glorify Antisocial Themes But Consumers Prefer Prosocial Music

Antisocial themes appeared 47 percent more frequently in songs at the top of the Billboard charts than in the songs popular on Facebook. And for the songs more popular on Facebook, pro-social themes appeared 16.5 percent more frequently than in the songs popular on the Billboard charts.

UCLA Study Finds Middle Schoolers Are Happier in Diverse School Settings

UCLA Study Finds Middle Schoolers Are Happier in Diverse School Settings

A new study by psychologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, finds that middle school students from a variety of ethnic and racial backgrounds feel safer, less lonely, and less bullied if they attend diverse schools.

A Statistical Portrait of First-Year Students at Black Colleges and Universities

A Statistical Portrait of First-Year Students at Black Colleges and Universities

Many HBCUs are affiliated with conservative religious organizations. Given this fact, it is no surprise that African-American students at these colleges are more likely to hold some conservative views and positions than African-American college students generally.