Stanford University related articles

Early School Interventions Can Reduce the Need for Disciplinary Actions With Young Black Males

Early School Interventions Can Reduce the Need for Disciplinary Actions With Young Black Males

According to a new study led by researchers at Stanford University, brief exercises that address middle school students’ worries about belonging can help young Black males develop better relationships with teachers and sharply reduce their risk of being disciplined years into the future.

Racial Student Achievement Gaps Have Remain Stagnant Over the Past 50 Years

Racial Student Achievement Gaps Have Remain Stagnant Over the Past 50 Years

While the Black-White achievement gap did narrow in the early decades of the period under study, it has remained stagnant for the past 25 years. Gains among 17-year-olds amounted to only 2 percent per decade, and none at all for the last quarter-century.

Four Academic Powerhouses Join Forces to Study Racial Issues in the Humanities

Four Academic Powerhouses Join Forces to Study Racial Issues in the Humanities

Academic centers at four leading universities have entered into a partnership to investigate the connections between the study of race and racism and academic fields in the humanities. The four participating institutions are Yale University, Stanford University, Brown University and the University of Chicago.

Linda Darling-Hammond Appointed President of the California State Board of Education

Linda Darling-Hammond Appointed President of the California State Board of Education

Dr. Darling-Hammond is the Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education, Emerita at Stanford University. She is a former president of the American Educational Research Association and a member of the National Academy of Education.

Jamel Brinkley Wins the 2018 Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence

Jamel Brinkley Wins the 2018 Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence

The award recognizes the outstanding work of rising African-American fiction writers. Brinkley’s book is a collection of nine short stories set in familiar places from his childhood, Brooklyn and the South Bronx. The author is the Wallace Stegner Fellow in Fiction at Stanford University.

Columbia University Scholar Uses Virtual Reality to Expose Whites to Racism

Columbia University Scholar Uses Virtual Reality to Expose Whites to Racism

The simulation immerses the viewer in the life of a fictional African American man as he encounters racism at different points in his life.

G. Marcus Cole Named Dean of Law School at the University of Notre Dame

G. Marcus Cole Named Dean of Law School at the University of Notre Dame

Currently, Cole serves as the William F. Baxter-Visa International Professor of Law at Stanford University. He first joined the Stanford faculty in 1997. At Stanford, he served for five years as associate dean for curriculum and academic affairs.

Study Finds That Institutional Support Is Essential for Black Ph.D. Students in STEM Fields to Succeed

Study Finds That Institutional Support Is Essential for Black Ph.D. Students in STEM Fields to Succeed

The research team investigated why Black graduate students were nearly three times less likely to have published a paper in an academic journal than White, Asian, and graduate students from other underrepresented groups.

Paul King Named President and CEO of Stanford Children's Health

Paul King Named President and CEO of Stanford Children’s Health

Paul King has been serving as executive director of the University of Michigan Health System’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital since 2013. He will begin his new job at Stanford in early 2019.

In Memoriam: Sharon Tolbert-Glover, 1940-2018

In Memoriam: Sharon Tolbert-Glover, 1940-2018

When Sharon Tolbert-Glover was only 15 years old, she became a nun at the convent of the Servites of Mary in Illinois. When she was assigned to a parish in suburban Chicago, the all-White congregants refused to accept her, causing her to resign from the order. She later had a long career in higher education.

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for a Quartet of Black Americans

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for a Quartet of Black Americans

Appointed to new administrative positions are Ronald Howell at Virginia State University, Olufemi Ogundele at the University of California, Berkeley, Dejah Carter at Stanford University, and Bryan Terry at Arkansas State University.

Condoleezza Rice to Be Honored by the American Political Science Association

Condoleezza Rice to Be Honored by the American Political Science Association

The announcement that Dr. Rice would be the recipient of the Hubert Humphrey Award has upset some members of the political science field. Over 130 scholars have signed a petition calling for the American Political Science Association to revoke Dr. Rice’s award.

Mark Dean Is the New Leader of the College of Engineering at the University of Tennessee

Mark Dean Is the New Leader of the College of Engineering at the University of Tennessee

Professor Dean, who holds three of the nine patents in the earliest development of the personal computer, joined the faculty at the University of Tennessee in 2013. Earlier, he was chief technology officer for the Middle East and Africa for IBM.

How Greater Diversity in the Physician Workforce Would Reduce Racial Health Disparities

How Greater Diversity in the Physician Workforce Would Reduce Racial Health Disparities

After conducting a randomized clinical trial among 1,300 Black men in Oakland, the researchers found that the men sought more preventive services after they were randomly seen by Black doctors for a free health-care screening compared to non-Black doctors.

Claudine Gay Named Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University

Claudine Gay Named Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University

Dr. Gay is the Wilbur A. Cowett Professor of Government and of African and African American Studies and is the founding chair of Harvard’s Inequality in America Initiative. She joined the faculty in 2006 and has served as dean of social science for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences since 2015.

In Memoriam: Roosevelt Ratliff Jr.

In Memoriam: Roosevelt Ratliff Jr.

Roosevelt Ratliff Jr. was a professor of English and assistant vice president of academic affairs at Claflin University in Orangeburg, South Carolina.

Racial Status Threat May Produce Backlash Against Federal Assistance Programs

Racial Status Threat May Produce Backlash Against Federal Assistance Programs

A new study finds that when White Americans are made aware that their demographic group will no longer be majority of the population of the United States, they become more resentful of minorities and are less likely to support federal entitlement programs like welfare.

Tulane's Jesmyn Ward to Receive the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award in Fiction

Tulane’s Jesmyn Ward to Receive the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award in Fiction

Jesmyn Ward, an associate professor of English at Tulane University in New Orleans, will receive the fiction award at the 83rd Annual Anisfield-Wolf Book Award ceremony in Cleveland this September. She is the only woman to win two National Book Awards.

Tulane University's Jesmyn Ward Nominated for the PEN/Faulkner Award in Fiction

Tulane University’s Jesmyn Ward Nominated for the PEN/Faulkner Award in Fiction

The five finalists for the PEN/Faulkner Award in fiction have been announced by the PEN/Faulkner Foundation in Washington, D.C. One of the five finalists is an African American: Jesmyn Ward, an associate professor of creative writing at Tulane University in New Orleans.

Researchers Find Instructor Bias Creeps into Online Education

Researchers Find Instructor Bias Creeps into Online Education

The researchers created fake accounts for students in 124 massive open online courses. The names associated with the accounts were designed to give a strong indication that students were either White, Black, Indian, or Chinese. White males were the most likely to get responses from instructors.

MIT Scholar Finds Racial Bias in Commercial Facial Analysis Programs

MIT Scholar Finds Racial Bias in Commercial Facial Analysis Programs

The study found that commercially available face analysis programs had a very low error rate when determining the gender of light-skinned men. For women who had the darkest skin, the systems failed to accurately determine their gender nearly half the time.

African American Scholar Wins National Book Award in Fiction

African American Scholar Wins National Book Award in Fiction

Jesmyn Ward is an associate professor of English at Tulane University. This is the second time she was won the National Book Award in fiction. In 2017, she was chosen as a MacArthur Fellow.

Valerie Jarrett Named a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School

Valerie Jarrett Named a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School

For eight years, Valerie Jarrett was a senior adviser to the President during the Obama administration. In her new role, she will participate in academic seminars, conferences, and student-led initiatives. Jarrett will continue to focus on issues of gender equality, criminal justice reform, health care, and civic engagement.

Stanford University Student Wins the Jamaican Rhodes Scholarship

Stanford University Student Wins the Jamaican Rhodes Scholarship

Jelani Munroe, a recent graduate of Stanford University, was awarded the Jamaican Rhodes Scholarship for 2018. Beginning this fall, he will study for a master’s degree in development studies at Oxford University.

In Memoriam: Mary Louise McKinney Edmonds, 1932-2017

In Memoriam: Mary Louise McKinney Edmonds, 1932-2017

Mary Edmonds was a faculty member at Cleveland State University, a dean at Bowling Green State University, and vice provost for student affairs at Stanford University.

Is Merit-Based Financial Aid Detrimental to the Future of American Medicine?

Is Merit-Based Financial Aid Detrimental to the Future of American Medicine?

The number of students who graduate with no medical school debt has nearly doubled in the past five years. In contrast, the number of students who graduate with more than $300,000 in debt has also doubled.

Michael V. Drake Elected Chair of the Association of American Universities

Michael V. Drake Elected Chair of the Association of American Universities

Dr. Drake became the 15th president of Ohio State University in June 2014. He is the first African American to hold the post. He will serve a one-year term as chair of the board of directors of the consortium of 62 leading research institutions.

Stanford University Report Documents Persisting Racial Inequality in the United States

Stanford University Report Documents Persisting Racial Inequality in the United States

The study finds that despite gains in educational attainments for African Americans and other underrepresented groups, profound and persisting inequalities exist in the United States in areas such as employment, health and housing.

Four Black Scholars Taking on New Academic Duties at Major Universities

Four Black Scholars Taking on New Academic Duties at Major Universities

Taking on new assignments are John Rickford at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, Michelle Harding at Virginia Tech, Natoya Haskins at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, and Robert T. Listenbee at Drexel University in Philadelphia.

Stanford University Study Develops Method to Quantify Racial Bias in Traffic Stops

Stanford University Study Develops Method to Quantify Racial Bias in Traffic Stops

The intellectual heart of the project involved the development of a more nuanced and statistically valid way to infer racial or ethnic discrimination after a person is pulled over for a traffic stop.

Berkeley Psychologist Looks to End Bias in School Discipline

Berkeley Psychologist Looks to End Bias in School Discipline

Jason Okonofua, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley has developed an online intervention program that allows school teachers to examine their implicit racial bias before handing out punishment for students in need of discipline.

Many Qualified, Low-Income Students Are Not Attending Our Best Colleges

Many Qualified, Low-Income Students Are Not Attending Our Best Colleges

A new report from the Center of Education and Workforce at Georgetown University finds that nearly 90,000 students who are eligible for federal Pell Grants for low income families, are qualified to be admitted to the nation’s selective colleges and universities but do not enroll in these institutions.

Professor Is the First African American to Lead a Federal Reserve Board Regional Bank

Professor Is the First African American to Lead a Federal Reserve Board Regional Bank

Raphael Bostic, has been serving as the Judith and John Bedrosian Chair in Governance and the Public Enterprise and director of the Bedrosian Center on Governance in the School of Public Policy at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

A Further Honor for a Giant in the Field of Sociology

A Further Honor for a Giant in the Field of Sociology

William Julius Wilson, the Lewis P. and Linda L. Geyser University Professor at Harvard University, has been selected to receive the 2017 SAGE-CASBS Award from SAGE Publishing and the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University.

Black Students' Loss of Trust in Their Teachers May Lead to Lower College Enrollment

Black Students’ Loss of Trust in Their Teachers May Lead to Lower College Enrollment

A new study finds that middle school students of color who lose trust in their teachers due to a perception of mistreatment or unfairness are less likely to go to college, even if they achieved good grades and test scores that qualified them for college admission.

Lawrence Jackson Is a New Bloomberg Distinguished Professor at Johns Hopkins

Lawrence Jackson Is a New Bloomberg Distinguished Professor at Johns Hopkins

Dr. Jackson’s appointment includes duties in the departments of English and history as well as the Center for Africana Studies. He plans on establishing a new institute to preserve and showcase the arts, history, and culture of the city of Baltimore.