New York University related articles

Racial Differences in Children's Perception of the Intelligence of Men and Women

Racial Differences in Children’s Perception of the Intelligence of Men and Women

A new study conducted ay New York University finds that children of all races are more likely to think of White men as ” brilliant” compared to White women. But the study found that children of all races do not extend this stereotype to African American men and women.

University Study Finds Racial Gap in Dentist Visits by Older Americans

University Study Finds Racial Gap in Dentist Visits by Older Americans

The study asked more than 20,000 adults over the age of 51 if they had visited a dentist over the past two years. Some 71 percent of participants responded yes. But there was a significant difference between Blacks and Whites.

In Memoriam: Paule Marshall, 1929-2019

In Memoriam: Paule Marshall, 1929-2019

Paule Marshall taught at both Virginia Commonwealth University and New York University. She authored numerous novels, essays, and works of short fiction.

In Memoriam: Niara Sudarkasa, 1938-2019

In Memoriam: Niara Sudarkasa, 1938-2019

In 1969, Dr. Sudarkasa joined the faculty at the University of Michigan. She was the first tenured African American faculty member at the university. In 1986, she was appointed the eleventh president of historically Black Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, and served in that role for 12 years.

New York University Study Finds Proactive Policing of Black Youth May Be Counterproductive

New York University Study Finds Proactive Policing of Black Youth May Be Counterproductive

According to a new study led by scholars New York University, Black adolescent boys who are stopped by police report more frequent engagement in delinquent behavior thereafter. The research also demonstrates that police stops have a negative impact on these adolescents’ psychological well-being.

Four African-American Scholars Elected Members of the American Academy of Arts and Letters

Four African-American Scholars Elected Members of the American Academy of Arts and Letters

The American Academy of Arts and Letters recently inducted 11 individuals into the 250-member honorary society. New members are elected only upon the death of other members. Of the 11 new members, four are African Americans.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

In Memoriam: David Williams II, 1947-2019

In Memoriam: David Williams II, 1947-2019

Williams was the first African American to serve as a vice chancellor at Vanderbilt. He also was the first African American to serve as an athletics director in the Southeastern Conference. Profesor Williams had also taught at the university’s law school since 2000.

Controversy Over Race Erupts at American Library Association Meeting

Controversy Over Race Erupts at American Library Association Meeting

A scholarly communications librarian at New York University states that she was verbally abused by a White colleague at the winter meetings of the American Library Association. The librarian stated that the organization warned her not to publicize the incident on social media.

Danielle Conway Named Dean of Penn State's Dickinson Law School

Danielle Conway Named Dean of Penn State’s Dickinson Law School

Professor Conway has served as dean and professor at the University of Maine School of Law since 2015. Earlier, she served on the faculty of law schools at the University of Hawaii, the University of Memphis, and Georgetown University.

Bowdoin College Scholar Explores the Issue of Slavery in Relation to the State of Maine

Bowdoin College Scholar Explores the Issue of Slavery in Relation to the State of Maine

Brian Purnell, an associate professor of history and Africana studies at Bowdoin College in Maine, believes that even though Maine’s statehood nearly 200 years ago kept the balance between slave-states and free-states, it strengthened slavery elsewhere.

New Evidence That Early Child Education Programs Can Have Long-Term Positive Benefits

New Evidence That Early Child Education Programs Can Have Long-Term Positive Benefits

Early studies have shown that early childhood education programs have initial benefits but that the positive effects slipped away when children entered elementary school. But new data shows that the long-term effects may be positive.

Racial Stereotypes Influence Teacher Perceptions of Parental Involvement in Children's Education

Racial Stereotypes Influence Teacher Perceptions of Parental Involvement in Children’s Education

A new study finds that school teachers believe that mothers and fathers of immigrant or minority students are less involved in their children’s education. The authors believe that such perspectives hamper the academic trajectory of those students.

New York University Study Finds Racial Gap in Publishing in Communication Studies

New York University Study Finds Racial Gap in Publishing in Communication Studies

A new study by scholars at New York University finds that non-White scholars continue to be significantly underrepresented in publication rates, citation rates, and editorial positions in communications and media studies.

Scholars Launch Effort to Digitize Records of Black Civil War Troops

Scholars Launch Effort to Digitize Records of Black Civil War Troops

A research team led by John Clegg, a doctoral student at New York University, is recruiting volunteers to transcribe the paper records of the estimated 200,000 members of the United States Colored Troops into a searchable database.

Race Determined to Be a Major Factor for Employment of Breast Cancer Survivors

Race Determined to Be a Major Factor for Employment of Breast Cancer Survivors

In a study conducted at Washington University in St. Louis, the data showed that African-American patients were four times more likely to leave the workforce despite fighting a cancer with high survival rates than was the case for White patients of the same age.

In Memoriam: William M. Pender Sr., 1922-2017

In Memoriam: William M. Pender Sr., 1922-2017

Dr. Pender was hired in 1965 as director of guidance and teacher training at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. He was a professor of education and later served as vice chancellor for academic affairs.

Alumnus Anthony Foxx Will Chair Davidson College's Commission on Race and Slavery

Alumnus Anthony Foxx Will Chair Davidson College’s Commission on Race and Slavery

The Davidson College Commission on Race and Slavery is charged with investigating how the college’s own history is intertwined with the institution of slavery, the lives and work of enslaved persons, and conceptions of race that emerged from this history.

New Teaching Roles for Two African American Scholars

New Teaching Roles for Two African American Scholars

Christina M. Greer, of Fordham University, was named the 2018 McSilver Fellow in Residence at the School of Social Work of New York University and Moon Molson will be joining the faculty at Princeton University as an assistant professor of visual arts.

Edwidge Danticat Wins the Neustadt International Prize for Literature

Edwidge Danticat Wins the Neustadt International Prize for Literature

Edwidge Danticat, the Haitian-American writer who has taught creative writing at New York University and the University of Miami, was chosen to receive the $50,000 Neustadt Prize, which is awarded by the University of Oklahoma.

New York University Study Shows School Diversity Has a Positive Impact on Achievement

New York University Study Shows School Diversity Has a Positive Impact on Achievement

The researchers found that there was a modest benefit for students attending the most diverse schools. Young students at more diverse schools scored better on achievement tests in mathematics and English and high school graduation rates at more diverse schools were higher.

Zadie Smith of New York University to Receive the Langston Hughes Medal

Zadie Smith of New York University to Receive the Langston Hughes Medal

The Langston Hughes Medal honors writers of poetry, drama, fiction, biographies, and critical essays from throughout the Black diaspora. Previous winners include James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Walter Mosley, Gwendolyn Brooks, Octavia Butler, August Wilson, and Edwidge Danticat.

Alvia Wardlaw Honored by the Association of African American Museums

Alvia Wardlaw Honored by the Association of African American Museums

Alvia Wardlaw is a professor of art history and director and curator of the University Museum at Texas Southern University in Houston. In 1996, she became the first African American to earn a Ph.D. in history at the University of Texas at Austin.

Dartmouth's Rashauna Johnson Is a Finalist for the Frederick Douglass Book Prize

Dartmouth’s Rashauna Johnson Is a Finalist for the Frederick Douglass Book Prize

Three finalists have been named for the 19th annual Frederick Douglass Book Prize that recognizes the best book on slavery, resistance, and/or abolition published in the preceding year. Only one of the three finalists is African American.

The New Dean of Arts and Sciences at Worcester Polytechnic Institute

The New Dean of Arts and Sciences at Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Jean King has been serving as vice provost for biomedical research at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester. Dr. King is also a professor of psychiatry, radiology, and neurology and director of the Center for Comparative Neuroimaging.

Vanderbilt's George Hill Retires as Vice Chancellor for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

Vanderbilt’s George Hill Retires as Vice Chancellor for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

Dr. Hill will remain affiliated with the university as professor emeritus in medical education and administration and professor emeritus of psychology, microbiology, and immunology.

New York City Public Schools Make Progress in College Readiness But Racial Gap Remains

New York City Public Schools Make Progress in College Readiness But Racial Gap Remains

For Black students in ninth grade in 2008, 76.6 percent graduated from high school and 56.3 percent enrolled in college. For White students in the ninth grade in 2008, 82 percent graduated from high school and 71 percent enrolled in college.

The Next Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at New York University

The Next Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at New York University

Dr. Jarrett has been serving as associate dean of the faculty in the humanities division at Boston University in Massachusetts. There, he has also been a professor of English and a professor of African American studies.

New York University Scholar Examines Teacher Racial Bias and Academic Expectations

New York University Scholar Examines Teacher Racial Bias and Academic Expectations

A study by an assistant professor of education at New York University finds that public school English and mathematics teachers tend to underestimate the academic abilities of African Americans and other students of color and this tends to impact their grades.

Four African American Scholars Taking on New Duties at Major Universities

Four African American Scholars Taking on New Duties at Major Universities

Rachel L. Swarns will join the faculty at New York University. Jennifer Hamer, a professor at the University of Kansas, will serve as vice provost for diversity. Autumn Womack was hired to the faculty at Princeton and Ibram X. Kendi is joining the faculty at American University.

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for Six African Americans

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for Six African Americans

The appointees are: Lisa M. Coleman at New York University, Constance Tucker at Oregon Health & Science University, Claude Poux at Dartmouth College, Charima Young at Penn State, Cliff Scott at the University of South Carolina, and Moses T. Alexander Greene at North Carolina State University.

Study Finds Colleges Can Share the Blame for the Racial Gap in Graduation Rates

Study Finds Colleges Can Share the Blame for the Racial Gap in Graduation Rates

A new study by researchers at New York University, Florida State University, and Southern Methodist University finds that more than 60 percent of the racial gap in college completion rates may be attributed to factors that occur before college.

Anna Deavere Smith Chosen to Receive the George Polk Career Award in Journalism

Anna Deavere Smith Chosen to Receive the George Polk Career Award in Journalism

Anna Deavere Smith is a professor of art and public policy at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. An actress, playwright, and performance artist, Smith is the first winner of the Polk Award who is not a traditional journalist.

Alondra Nelson Will Be the Next President of the Social Science Research Council

Alondra Nelson Will Be the Next President of the Social Science Research Council

Alondra Nelson, a professor of sociology and dean of social science at Columbia University in New York City, will serve as president of the Social Science Research Council for five years beginning in September.

In Memoriam: Jewell Plummer Cobb, 1924-2017

In Memoriam: Jewell Plummer Cobb, 1924-2017

In 1981, Professor Cobb was appointed president of California State University, Fullerton. She was the first African American women to lead a major university west of the Mississippi River.

Three African American Men in New University Positions

Three African American Men in New University Positions

Taking on new roles are Delarious O. Stewart at North Carolina Central University in Durham, Timothy K. Eatman at Rutgers University-Newark, and Garvin A. Reid at the Abu Dhabi campus of New York University.