New York University related articles

In Memoriam: Roscoe Conkling Brown Jr., 1922-2016

In Memoriam: Roscoe Conkling Brown Jr., 1922-2016

Roscoe C. Brown Jr. was a Tuskegee Airman who was former president of Bronx Community College in New York and a former professor at New York University and the Graduate Center at the City University of New York.

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

How African American Parents Talk to Their Young Children About Race

How African American Parents Talk to Their Young Children About Race

A new study led by a researcher at New York University, finds that when African American parents talk to their children about racial issues, they tend to emphasize equal rights and opportunity rather than racism or discrimination.

Craig Boise Named the Next Dean of the College of Law at Syracuse University

Craig Boise Named the Next Dean of the College of Law at Syracuse University

Since 2011, Professor Boise has been serving as dean of the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law at Cleveland State University in Ohio. Earlier, he served on the law school faculty at DePaul University in Chicago and Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.

In Memoriam: Booker Taliaferro Felder, 1922-2016

In Memoriam: Booker Taliaferro Felder, 1922-2016

Booker Taliaferro Felder taught in the clothing and related arts department at Tuskegee University in Alabama for 40 years. After retiring from teaching he operated a gift shop across the street from the university’s campus.

Four African Americans Win Marshall Scholarships

Four African Americans Win Marshall Scholarships

This year 32 Marshall Scholarships were awarded for American students to spend two years in graduate study at a university in the United Kingdom. It appears from JBHE research, that four of this year’s 32 winners are African Americans.

Historian Wins Two Book Awards for Her Work on Black Women in Pornography

Historian Wins Two Book Awards for Her Work on Black Women in Pornography

Mireille Miller-Young, an associate professor of feminist studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has won awards from the American Studies Association and the National Women’s Studies Association for her book A Taste for Brown Sugar: Black Women in Pornography.

New York University Historian to Be Awarded the Frederick Douglass Book Prize

New York University Historian to Be Awarded the Frederick Douglass Book Prize

Ada Ferrer, professor of history and professor of Latin American and Caribbean studies, will be awarded the $25,000 prize for the best book of the year on slavery or abolition that was written in the English language.

Emily Raboteau Wins the International Flash Fiction Competition

Emily Raboteau Wins the International Flash Fiction Competition

Emily Raboteau, a professor of English and creative writing at the City College of New York, won the $20,000 first prize for her 100-word short story entitled “Oysters.” It was selected from more than 35,000 entries worldwide.

Suzan-Lori Parks Wins the 2015 Gish Prize

Suzan-Lori Parks Wins the 2015 Gish Prize

The Gish Prize, considered among the top honors in the arts, comes with a cash award valued at $300,000. Parks is a graduate of Mount Holyoke College and teaches creative writing at New York University.

How Broadband Internet Access Fueled a Rise in Hate Crimes

How Broadband Internet Access Fueled a Rise in Hate Crimes

Researchers at the University of Minnesota and New York University found that in counties where broadband Internet access became readily available in the early years of the century, the number of hate crimes increased by an average of 20 percent.

The New Leader of the Institute of Jazz Studies at Rutgers University

The New Leader of the Institute of Jazz Studies at Rutgers University

The Institute of Jazz Studies in the John Cotton Dana Library on the Newark, New Jersey, campus of Rutgers University is the repository of more than 150,000 jazz recordings and 6,000 books on the subject.

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Major New Survey Effort Will Measure Higher Education's Effect on Students' Diversity Views

Major New Survey Effort Will Measure Higher Education’s Effect on Students’ Diversity Views

This fall, 100,000 students at 130 colleges and universities nationwide, will begin to participate in a four-year study that will determine how their views on issues of faith and diversity change during their time at college.

Gregory Pardlo Wins the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry

Gregory Pardlo Wins the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry

Gregory Pardlo, both an instructor and a student at Columbia University in New York City, has won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. He is also completing work on his doctoral dissertation at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Five Black Scholars Elected Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences

Five Black Scholars Elected Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences

Through an analysis of the list of new fellows conducted by JBHE, it appears that eight of the new members of the AAAS are Black. Five of the eight have current ties to the academic world.

African Americans in the 2015 Class of Truman Scholars

African Americans in the 2015 Class of Truman Scholars

This year, 58 Truman scholars were selected from 688 candidates nominated by 297 colleges and universities. Of this year’s 58 Truman Scholars, it appears that 11, or 19 percent, are African Americans.

New York University Study Shows Neighborhood Stigma Impacts Online Transactions

New York University Study Shows Neighborhood Stigma Impacts Online Transactions

Researchers placed ads for used iPhones on online exchanges in 12 cities. For ads listing low-income neighborhoods that are predominantly Black, 21 percent fewer responses were received.

Spelman College Names Its Next President

Spelman College Names Its Next President

Mary Schmidt Campbell is dean emerita of the Tisch School of the Arts and University Professor of art and public policy at New York University. She will become president of Spelman College in Atlanta on August 1.

Two African Americans in New Administrative Posts at U.S. Universities

Two African Americans in New Administrative Posts at U.S. Universities

Vicki T. Sapp was appointed director of community and organizational development at the University of Rhode Island and Timothy V. Johnson was named director of the Tamiment Library at New York University.

Suzan-Lori Parks Wins the Edward M. Kennedy Prize for Drama Inspired by American History

Suzan-Lori Parks Wins the Edward M. Kennedy Prize for Drama Inspired by American History

Suzan-Lori Parks teaches creative writing at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. She was honored for her play “Father Comes Home From the Wars, Parts 1, 2 & 3,” which was first staged at The Public Theater in New York last October.

Children Raised in Single-Parent Homes Are Less Likely to Complete College

Children Raised in Single-Parent Homes Are Less Likely to Complete College

For young adults who have reached the age of 24, those who grew up in single-parent homes were less likely to have obtained a bachelor’s degree than children raised in married-couple households. Income differences explain only one half of the gap.

In Memoriam: Reuben V. Burrell, 1919-2015

In Memoriam: Reuben V. Burrell, 1919-2015

Burrell started taking photographs at the 1949 commencement ceremonies at Hampton University. At the time of his death he was 95 years old and went to work up to the day before he died.

Yusef Komunyakaa Awarded the Sidney Lanier Prize for Southern Literature

Yusef Komunyakaa Awarded the Sidney Lanier Prize for Southern Literature

Yusef Komunyakaa is the Global Distinguished Professor of English at New York University. He is being honored by the Center for Southern Studies at Mercer University in Macon, Georgia.

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Five African Americans Appointed to New University Administrative Positions

Five African Americans Appointed to New University Administrative Positions

The appointees are Delbert T. Foster at South Carolina State, Alta Mauro at New York University’s Abu Dhabi campus, Willie James Young Jr. at Mississippi Valley State, Lotoya Battle-Brown at Rutgers University-Newark, and Dennis A. Mitchell at Columbia University.

Four Black Scholars Taking on New Teaching Assignments

Four Black Scholars Taking on New Teaching Assignments

Those taking on new teaching assignments are Kendrick Meek at Howard University, Tiffany Murphy at the University of Arkansas, Stacy Davis at St. Mary’s College in Indiana, and Linton Kwesi Johnson at New York University.

McKinley Boston Retiring as Athletics Director at New Mexico State University

McKinley Boston Retiring as Athletics Director at New Mexico State University

Dr. Boston has served as athletics director at New Mexico State University for the past 10 years. Earlier in his academic career he was director of athletics at the University of Minnesota, where he also served as vice president for student affairs.

Using Monetary Incentives to Improve the Diet of Low-Income Families

Using Monetary Incentives to Improve the Diet of Low-Income Families

A new study led by researchers at New York University finds that vouchers good for fruit and vegetables at farmers’ markets in urban areas can significantly improve the diets of low-income minority families.

New York University Program Improves Black Participation in Medical Studies

New York University Program Improves Black Participation in Medical Studies

A new program developed at the New York University College of Nursing uses a peer-driven recruitment and education program that focuses on the problem of disproportionate involvement of African Americans in HIV/AIDS medical studies.

Three Black Scholars in New Teaching Roles

Three Black Scholars in New Teaching Roles

Kwame Anthony Appiah was named professor emeritus and Ruha Benjamin was appointed assistant professor of African American studies at Princeton University. Christopher Bonner is a new assistant professor of history at the University of Maryland.

Seven African American Scholars Elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences

Seven African American Scholars Elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences

Through an analysis of the list of new fellows conducted by JBHE, it appears that 11 of the 188 new American members of the AAAS are African Americans. Thus, African Americans make up only 5.9 percent of the new members of the academy.

Blacks Face Bias When Seeking Mentors Among University Faculty

Blacks Face Bias When Seeking Mentors Among University Faculty

A study, co-authored by Modupe Akinola of Columbia Business School, found that faculty members were less likely to respond to mentoring requests from prospective Black students than White students.

NYU Scholar Lyle Ashton Harris Selected to Win the David C. Driskell Prize

NYU Scholar Lyle Ashton Harris Selected to Win the David C. Driskell Prize

Lyle Ashton Harris was chosen as the winner of the 2014 David C. Driskell Prize, given to an early career scholar or artist who has made an original and important contribution to the field of African American art or art history.

Harvard's New Group of W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute Fellows

Harvard’s New Group of W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute Fellows

Black scholars who are among the new group of fellows are Christopher Emdin, Shose Kessi, Achille Mbembe, Mark Anthony Neal, Wole Soyinka, and Deborah Willis.

James McBride Wins the National Book Award for Fiction

James McBride Wins the National Book Award for Fiction

James McBride, Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University, won the National Book Award for fiction for his novel The Good Lord Bird.