National Institutes of Health related articles

Towson University Scholar Honored by the National Institutes of Health

Towson University Scholar Honored by the National Institutes of Health

Sharon Jones-Eversley, an assistant professor of family studies, has been honored with the distinguished PRIDE Award. PRIDE is an acronym for the Program to Increase Diversity Among Individuals Engaged in Health-Related Research.

NIH-Sponsored Study Shows the Value of Mentoring for Science Faculty at HBCUs

NIH-Sponsored Study Shows the Value of Mentoring for Science Faculty at HBCUs

The study found that mentoring program for science faculty at these institutions resulted in an increase in the number of published articles in peer-reviewed journals, an increase in grants won, and an increase in professional and career activities.

National Institutes of Health Reaches an Agreement With the Family of Henrietta Lacks

National Institutes of Health Reaches an Agreement With the Family of Henrietta Lacks

In 1951 Henrietta Lacks’ cancer cells were extracted for research without her knowledge. Researchers were able to keep her cancer cells alive and they continued to replicate in the laboratory. The so-called HeLa cells are still used in research today and have been used to make important scientific advances.

Study Finds No Racial Bias in Research Grants by the National Institutes of Health

Study Finds No Racial Bias in Research Grants by the National Institutes of Health

A 2011 paper hinted that Black scholars faced racial bias in grant approvals from the National Institutes of Health. But a new study finds that when the total dollar value of the grants and the total number of programs funded are compared, there is no evidence of racial bias.

NYU Receives Three Grants Relating to Africa

NYU Receives Three Grants Relating to Africa

The university will receive more than $8 million in research grants over the next five years.

Racial Disparity Found in Approvals of Grants by the National Institutes of Health

Racial Disparity Found in Approvals of Grants by the National Institutes of Health

A new study led by Donna K. Ginther found that black scientists were 13 percentage points less likely than white scientists to win grants from the National Institutes of Health.