MIT related articles

Sylvester James Gates to Lead the American Physical Society

Sylvester James Gates to Lead the American Physical Society

Dr. Gates, Ford Foundation Professor at Brown University, has been named to the presidential line of the American Physical Society, a nonprofit organization that represents more than 55,000 physicists worldwide. Dr. Gates will serve as vice president in 2019, president-elect in 2020, and president in 2021.

In Memoriam: Kofi Atta Annan, 1938-2018

In Memoriam: Kofi Atta Annan, 1938-2018

Kofi Annan was a career diplomat from Ghana who served as the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1997 to December 2006. He earned a bachelor’s degree at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, and master’s degree in management at MIT.

Howard University Partners With Carnegie Mellon for Engineering Initiative

Howard University Partners With Carnegie Mellon for Engineering Initiative

This partnership between historically Black Howard University and Carnegie Mellon University will cover a wide range of initiatives between the two institutions, including a dual-degree Ph.D. program that will allow students to earn a doctoral degree in engineering from both schools.

Johns Hopkins University Scholar Wins the $50,000 Hiett Prize in the Humanities

Johns Hopkins University Scholar Wins the $50,000 Hiett Prize in the Humanities

Chris Lebron, an associate professor of philosophy, is the winner of the award that recognizes “ascending” scholars whose are “devoted to the humanities and whose work shows extraordinary promise to have a significant impact on contemporary culture.”

New Study Shows Racial Health Gap in HIV Cases Remains Wide

New Study Shows Racial Health Gap in HIV Cases Remains Wide

In 2016, Blacks were 8.4 times more likely than Whites to be diagnosed with HIV, whereas in 2005 they were 7.9 times more likely. The number Black men diagnosed with HIV increased from 9,969 in 2005 to 12,890 in 2016.

Seven African Americans Who Are Taking on New Administrative Roles at Universities

Seven African Americans Who Are Taking on New Administrative Roles at Universities

Here is this week’s roundup of African Americans who have been appointed to new administrative positions at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

MIT Debuts a New Website Documenting Its African American History

MIT Debuts a New Website Documenting Its African American History

At present, the website offers more than 500 illustrations, photographs, and other archival material. An additional 2,500 items already collected by the MIT Black History Project will be included in the future.

MIT Scholar Finds Racial Bias in Commercial Facial Analysis Programs

MIT Scholar Finds Racial Bias in Commercial Facial Analysis Programs

The study found that commercially available face analysis programs had a very low error rate when determining the gender of light-skinned men. For women who had the darkest skin, the systems failed to accurately determine their gender nearly half the time.

Reginald Rogers Named Educator of the Year by the National Society of Black Engineers

Reginald Rogers Named Educator of the Year by the National Society of Black Engineers

The Dr. Janice A. Lumpkin Educator of the Year Award from the National Society of Black Engineers is given annually to a collegiate faculty member who demonstrates commitment to advancing education in engineering, science or mathematics.

Two African American Scholars Poised to Take on New Roles

Two African American Scholars Poised to Take on New Roles

Pamela Jackson, an associate professor and dean of the College of Business and Economics at Fayetteville State University in North Carolina was appointed interim provost. And Bryan Bryson will join the faculty at MIT as an assistant professor of biological engineering.

School of Architecture and Planning at MIT Adds Three Black Faculty Members

School of Architecture and Planning at MIT Adds Three Black Faculty Members

The School of Architecture and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has announced the appointment of five new faculty members. Three of the new hires are African Americans: Jason Jackson, Erica James, and Danielle Woods.

New Assignments for Nine Black Faculty Members in Higher Education

New Assignments for Nine Black Faculty Members in Higher Education

Here is this week’s roundup of Black scholars who have been hired or assigned new duties at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Four African American Women Scholars Taking on New Roles in Academia

Four African American Women Scholars Taking on New Roles in Academia

The Black scholars assigned to new duties are Nadia Nurhussein at Johns Hopkins University, Sonja S. Watson at the University of Texas at Arlington, Danielle Wood at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Peggie R. Smith at Washington University in St. Louis.

Leo Morton Stepping Down as Chancellor of the University of Missouri-Kansas City in October

Leo Morton Stepping Down as Chancellor of the University of Missouri-Kansas City in October

This past May, Leo E. Morton, chancellor of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, announced that he would step down at the end of the 2017-18 academic year. Now Chancellor Morton has announced that he will leave the university in October.

Six African Americans Appointed to New Administrative Positions in Higher Education

Six African Americans Appointed to New Administrative Positions in Higher Education

Taking on new roles are Jessica Evans at Murray State University, Jacqueline Jackson at Harford Community College, Kirsten Boswell-Ford at MIT, Teresa L. Smallwood at Vanderbilt Divinity School, Renarde D. Earl at Fayetteville State University, and Sharon Taylor Burnett at Tuskegee University.

Only One Black Scholar Among This Year's 22 Pew Scholars in the Biomedical Sciences

Only One Black Scholar Among This Year’s 22 Pew Scholars in the Biomedical Sciences

Ibrahim I. Cissé, the Class of 1922 Career Development Assistant Professor in physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will receive $240,000 over the next four years from the Pew Charitable Trusts to support his research.

Notable Honors Awarded to Two African American Women in Higher Education

Notable Honors Awarded to Two African American Women in Higher Education

Rita Dove, Commonwealth Professor of English at the University of Virginia, was honored by the U.S. Presidential Scholars Foundation and DiOnetta Jones Crayton, associate dean for undergraduate education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, received an award from the Women in Engineering Pro-Active Network.

Leo E. Morton to Step Down as Chancellor of the University of Missouri-Kansas City

Leo E. Morton to Step Down as Chancellor of the University of Missouri-Kansas City

Morton has led the university since December 2008. At that time, he was chair of the university’s board of trustees and agreed to lead the university as interim chancellor until a new leader could be found. But a few months later, the board asked him to take the job on a permanent basis.

Five African American Faculty Members Given New Assignments

Five African American Faculty Members Given New Assignments

The faculty members taking on new roles are Dineo Khabele at the University of Kansas Health System, Cullen Buie at MIT, Ingrid M. Nembhard at Yale University, Cherlon Ussery at Carleton College in Minnesota, and Kami Chavis at Wake Forest University in North Carolina.

Mark Smith Appointed Dean of the Graduate School at the University of Texas at Austin

Mark Smith Appointed Dean of the Graduate School at the University of Texas at Austin

Dr. Smith was a member of the 1980 and 1984 U.S. Olympic team in the sport of fencing. He currently serves as dean of the Graduate School at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. He has held that post since 2009.

Harvard and MIT to Collaborate on Project to Boost Genetics Research in Africa

Harvard and MIT to Collaborate on Project to Boost Genetics Research in Africa

The Global Initiative for Neuropsychiatric Genetics Education in Research Project (GINGER) has recruited 17 African scholars who will attend workshops in the United States and London over the next two years on epidemiology, bioinformatics, genetics, and grant writing.

Three Black Scholars Elected Members of the National Academy of Engineering

Three Black Scholars Elected Members of the National Academy of Engineering

The National Academy of Engineering recently announced the election of 84 new members. The academy does not disclose the racial makeup of its membership, but it appears that there are three Black engineers among the 84 new members.

Four Black Scholars Honored With Prestigious Awards

Four Black Scholars Honored With Prestigious Awards

The honorees are Wanda Spurlock of Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Carmen Robinson of the University of California, Santa Cruz, Alex Acholonu of Alcorn State University in Mississippi, and Joy Buolamwini of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Morehouse College Announces It Will Change Its Leadership

Morehouse College Announces It Will Change Its Leadership

The board of trustees of Morehouse College, the historically Black educational institution for men in Atlanta, has announced that it will not extend the contract of the college’s president John S. Wilson Jr. beyond June 30, 2017.

New Fellowship to Aid Black Students at the Harvard Graduate School of Design

New Fellowship to Aid Black Students at the Harvard Graduate School of Design

The Philip Freelon Fellowship Fund at the Harvard Graduate School of Design will be used to provide financial aid to African Americans and students from other underrepresented groups who are pursuing graduate degrees in design.

Five Black Professors Receive New Teaching Assignments

Five Black Professors Receive New Teaching Assignments

Taking on new teaching roles are Craig S. Wilder at MIT, Stacy-Ann January at the University of South Carolina, Wonder Drake at Vanderbilt University, Joseph Ravenell at New York University, and Marlon James at Macalester College in Minnesota.

New Mentoring and Networking Group for Black Women at MIT

New Mentoring and Networking Group for Black Women at MIT

My Sister’s Keeper, founded by Professor Helen Elaine Lee, seeks to support Black women students, with social, professional, and mentoring relationships. To meet this goal, the organization has created “sister circles,” small groups of five or six students, staff, and faculty united by common interests.

New Discovery May Improve Treatment for Those Who Suffer From Sickle Cell Disease

New Discovery May Improve Treatment for Those Who Suffer From Sickle Cell Disease

A study by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Pittsburgh, Harvard University, MIT , Florida Atlantic University, and the University of Korea reports on a discovery that may help physicians treat those who suffer from sickle cell disease.

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Professor Glenn Loury Honored by the American Economic Association

Professor Glenn Loury Honored by the American Economic Association

Glenn C. Loury, the Merton P. Stolz Professor of the social sciences and professor of economics at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, was named a Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association.

Five African Americans Appointed to New Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Five African Americans Appointed to New Administrative Posts in Higher Education

The appointees are Timothy Dunn at Trinity College in Connecticut, Eboney Hearn at MIT, Latonya Guillory at the University of Southern Mississippi, Tracy Dildy at Chicago State University, and Getchel L. Caldwell at Clark Atlanta University.

The New President of South Carolina State University

The New President of South Carolina State University

James E. Clark was named the 12th president of South Carolina State University. Clark, a successful businessman, has been a member of the board of trustees of South Carolina State University for the past year. He has also been chair of the University of South Carolina Research Foundation for the past three years.

The NFL Player Pursuing a Ph.D. in Mathematics at MIT

The NFL Player Pursuing a Ph.D. in Mathematics at MIT

John Urschel, an offensive guard for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League, recently completed his first semester in the mathematics Ph.D. program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He took four courses and had a 4.0 grade point average.

MIT Debuts Excellence Through Adversity Award to Honor Robbin Chapman of Wellesley College

MIT Debuts Excellence Through Adversity Award to Honor Robbin Chapman of Wellesley College

Robbin Chapman is the former manager of diversity recruiting at the School of Architecture and Planning at MIT and also served as the inaugural assistant associate provost for faculty equity at the university. She joined the administration of Wellesley College in suburban Boston in 2011.

Using Technology to Shrink the Literacy Gap

Using Technology to Shrink the Literacy Gap

A new study by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Tufts University, and Georgia State University, finds that tablet computers loaded with literary applications and issued to students in low-income areas can produce dramatic results without any instruction whatsoever.

Four African Americans Appointed to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Four African Americans Appointed to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Appointed to new administrative positions are Judy Jackson at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Aramis Watson at the University of Kansas, Cameron J. Hall at Augustana College in Illinois and Dale R. Hendricks at the University of Massachusetts.