Harvard University related articles

New Study Shows Racial Health Gap in HIV Cases Remains Wide

New Study Shows Racial Health Gap in HIV Cases Remains Wide

In 2016, Blacks were 8.4 times more likely than Whites to be diagnosed with HIV, whereas in 2005 they were 7.9 times more likely. The number Black men diagnosed with HIV increased from 9,969 in 2005 to 12,890 in 2016.

Princeton University Looks to Diversify its Collection of Portraits

Princeton University Looks to Diversify its Collection of Portraits

Portraits of Nobel prize winner Toni Morrison and Sir Arthur Lewis have been added to the university’s collection. Eight other portraits have been commissioned. Three of the new portraits will feature African Americans.

Five African Americans Assigned to Dean Positions

Five African Americans Assigned to Dean Positions

The five Black scholars appointed to dean posts are Rochelle L. Ford at Elon University in North Carolina, Emile M. Townes at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Darryl Scriven at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina, Tomiko Brown-Nagin at Harvard University, and Laura Kohn-Wood at the University of Miami.

Four Black Scholars Appointed to Positions as Deans

Four Black Scholars Appointed to Positions as Deans

Newly appointed to positions as deans are George Nnanna at the University of Texas-Permian Basin, Bridget Terry Long at Harvard University, Thomas LaVeist at Tulane University in New Orleans, and Clarence Long at the University of Kansas.

Henry Louis Gates Jr. Awarded the 2018 Creativity Laureate Prize

Henry Louis Gates Jr. Awarded the 2018 Creativity Laureate Prize

Henry Louis Gates Jr., the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard University, was honored recently at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Linda Oubré Selected as the Fifteenth President of Whittier College in California

Linda Oubré Selected as the Fifteenth President of Whittier College in California

For the past six years, Dr. Oubré has served as dean of the College of Business at San Francisco State University. Earlier, Dr. Oubré was executive director of corporate relations and business development, and chief diversity officer for the Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Davis.

Shane McCrae to Receive the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award in Poetry

Shane McCrae to Receive the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award in Poetry

Shane McCrae is an assistant professor of writing in the School of the Arts at Columbia University in New York City. McCrae joined the faculty at Columbia University in 2017 after teaching for three years at Oberlin College in Ohio.

Henri Ford to Be the New Dean of the University of Miami School of Medicine

Henri Ford to Be the New Dean of the University of Miami School of Medicine

Dr. Ford is professor of surgery and vice chair for clinical affairs at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. In 2011, he was honored by the American Association of Medical Colleges for his humanitarian work following the major earthquake in Haiti.

Oregon State University Honors African American Novelist Colson Whitehead

Oregon State University Honors African American Novelist Colson Whitehead

Colson Whitehead has been selected to receive the 2019 Stone Award for Literacy Achievement from Oregon State University. The award is presented to an American author who has created a body of critically acclaimed work and has been a mentor to young writers.

Four African Americans Taking on New Assignments at Colleges and Universities

Four African Americans Taking on New Assignments at Colleges and Universities

Taking on new roles are John Silvanus Wilson Jr. at Harvard University, Moryah Jackson at Clemson University in South Carolina, Kijua Sanders-McMurty at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts, and A.L. Fleming at Albany State University in Georgia.

In Memoriam: Jeffrey B. Ferguson, 1964-2018

In Memoriam: Jeffrey B. Ferguson, 1964-2018

Jeffrey B. Ferguson was the Karen and Brian Conway ’80 Presidential Teaching Professor of Black Studies at Amherst College in Massachusetts. He was a prominent scholar of the Harlem Renaissance.

The Andrew Brimmer Collection at Harvard Is Now Available for Scholarly Research

The Andrew Brimmer Collection at Harvard Is Now Available for Scholarly Research

Andrew F. Brimmer was a respected economist who was the first African American to serve as a governor of the Federal Reserve System. His massive archival collection of papers is now available for scholarly research at the library of Harvard Business School.

University of South Carolina Honors Its First Black Faculty Member

University of South Carolina Honors Its First Black Faculty Member

In 1873, during the Reconstruction period when Blacks held political power in South Carolina, Richard T. Greener joined the faculty at the University of South Carolina. Four years later, all Black faculty and students were purged from the university.

In Memoriam: Saul T. Wilson Jr., 1928-2018

In Memoriam: Saul T. Wilson Jr., 1928-2018

Saul T. Wilson, Jr. was a member of the first pre-veterinary medicine class at what was then the Tuskegee Institute. He was a member of the second class of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Tuskegee and later served on the faculty.

New Research Verifies Glass Was Manufactured in Africa Before the Arrival of Europeans

New Research Verifies Glass Was Manufactured in Africa Before the Arrival of Europeans

Abidemi Babatunde Babalola, a visiting fellow at Harvard University with a Ph.D. in anthropology from Rice University in Houston, finds that that glass was being produced in sub-Saharan Africa as early as the 11th century, well before the arrival of Europeans.

Dorothy Browne Named Provost at Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina

Dorothy Browne Named Provost at Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina

In 2015, Dr. Browne was named the inaugural dean of the School of Public Health at Jackson State University in Mississippi. Earlier in her career, she was a professor of public health and senior scientist at the Prevention Research Center at Morgan State University in Baltimore.

Will the New Tax on University Endowments Hurt African American College Students?

Will the New Tax on University Endowments Hurt African American College Students?

The new tax on endowment investment income will only impact about 35 educational institutions, including most Ivy League universities and other high-ranked educational institutions with the largest endowments. The tax may force cuts in financial aid programs critical to African Americans.

In Memoriam: Calestous Juma, 1953-2017

In Memoriam: Calestous Juma, 1953-2017

Calestous Juma was a professor of the practice of international development at the Kennedy School of Harvard University. A native of Kenya, Dr. Juma earned a Ph.D. in science and technology studies at the University of Sussex in England.

Harvard Accepts a Large Group of Black Students in Its Early Action Process

Harvard Accepts a Large Group of Black Students in Its Early Action Process

African Americans make up 13.9 percent of all students admitted in its nonbinding early action process. This is up from 12.6 percent a year ago.

Harvard University Acquires Massive Drawing by Kara Walker

Harvard University Acquires Massive Drawing by Kara Walker

Harvard University has acquired a collage of drawings by contemporary artist Kara Walker entitled “U.S.A. Idioms.” The collage is the largest work in the more than 250,000 works held by Harvard University.

Elfred Anthony Pinkard Appointed President of Wilberforce University

Elfred Anthony Pinkard Appointed President of Wilberforce University

Dr. Pinkard has been serving as provost and executive vice president at Wilberforce. Before coming to Ohio, Dr. Pinkard was senior vice president, vice president for institutional advancement, and chief operating officer at Livingstone College in North Carolina.

Two Black Students at Harvard Awarded International Rhodes Scholarships

Two Black Students at Harvard Awarded International Rhodes Scholarships

Two Black students at Harvard University have been awarded Rhodes Scholarships, allocated to their home country or region. Terrens Muradzikwa is an economics major from Zimbabwe and Mandela Patrick is a computer science major from Trinidad.

Is Merit-Based Financial Aid Detrimental to the Future of American Medicine?

Is Merit-Based Financial Aid Detrimental to the Future of American Medicine?

The number of students who graduate with no medical school debt has nearly doubled in the past five years. In contrast, the number of students who graduate with more than $300,000 in debt has also doubled.

Higher Income Blacks More Likely to Experience Racism and Discrimination

Higher Income Blacks More Likely to Experience Racism and Discrimination

African Americans who are climbing the socioeconomic ladder find themselves in more situations where they’re in the minority – whether that’s at school, work or in their neighborhood than is the case for lower-income African Americans.

Chemical Engineer at Arizona State Honored as Educator of the Year

Chemical Engineer at Arizona State Honored as Educator of the Year

Jean Andino, an associate professor of chemical engineering at Arizona State University, received the Educator of the Year Award from the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers.

In Memoriam: Gloria Johnson-Powell, 1936-2017

In Memoriam: Gloria Johnson-Powell, 1936-2017

Dr. Gloria Johnson-Powell considered dropping out of Meharry Medical College to devote more time to civil rights activism. However, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. urged her to complete her studies. She did.

Ruth J. Simmons Appointed the Eighth President of Prairie View A&M University in Texas

Ruth J. Simmons Appointed the Eighth President of Prairie View A&M University in Texas

Dr. Simmons has been serving as interim president of the university since July. She served as the 18th president of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, from 2001 to 2012. Before becoming president of Brown University, Dr. Simmons was president of Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Distinguished Honors for Three African American Faculty Members

Distinguished Honors for Three African American Faculty Members

Professor Charles Ogletree is having an endowed chair named in his honor at Harvard Law School. Jawole Willa Jo Zollar of Florida State University was honored for lifetime achievement in dance and Trudier Harris of the University of Alabama has honored for being the first tenured Black faculty member at the College of William and Mary.

David A. Thomas Named the 12th President of Morehouse College

David A. Thomas Named the 12th President of Morehouse College

Dr. Thomas currently serves as the H. Naylor Fitzhugh Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. He is the former dean of the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University.

New Assignments for Nine Black Faculty Members in Higher Education

New Assignments for Nine Black Faculty Members in Higher Education

Here is this week’s roundup of Black scholars who have been hired or assigned new duties at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Eight Black Faculty Members Who Have Been Given New Assignments

Eight Black Faculty Members Who Have Been Given New Assignments

Here is this week’s roundup of Black scholars who have been hired or assigned new duties at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Honors and Awards for Five African Americans With Ties to Academia

Honors and Awards for Five African Americans With Ties to Academia

Those presented with awards or who received honors are Torina D. Lewis of Clark Atlanta University, Hank Aaron at the University of Notre Dame, Charles Ogletree of Harvard Law School, Thomas J. Freeman of Texas Southern University, and Wilma Harper Horne at Hampton University.

Harvard-Based Journal on Africa and the Diaspora Is Printed Once Again in Africa

Harvard-Based Journal on Africa and the Diaspora Is Printed Once Again in Africa

The journal Transition was founded in 1961 in Kampala, Uganda, and became an important voice of Black intellectual thought as the continent transitioned from colonial rule to independence. For the past quarter century, the journal has been housed at Harvard University.

Harvard Law School Honors Slaves Whose Labor Produced Wealth That Led to the School's Founding

Harvard Law School Honors Slaves Whose Labor Produced Wealth That Led to the School’s Founding

Harvard University recently dedicated a plaque in the Harvard Law School plaza to honor the slaves who created the wealth which enabled Isaac Royall Jr. to provide funds for the establishment of the law school in 1817. The Royall family generated wealth from the slave trade and the operation of a sugar plantation in Antigua.

Charity Hudley Named to an Endowed Chair at the University of California, Santa Barbara

Charity Hudley Named to an Endowed Chair at the University of California, Santa Barbara

Dr. Hudley was the William and Mary Professor of Community Studies and an associate professor of English at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. She joined the faculty there in 2005.

Differences in Treatment for Those Who Suffer Cardiac Arrest by Racial Makeup of Neighborhood

Differences in Treatment for Those Who Suffer Cardiac Arrest by Racial Makeup of Neighborhood

A new study, led by a Duke University School of Medicine scholar, found that people who live in predominantly White neighborhoods are much more likely than people who live in predominantly Black neighborhoods to be treated with CPR or a defibrillator after suffering cardiac arrest.