Harvard University related articles

Four African American Women Who Have Been Appointed to University Diversity Posts

Four African American Women Who Have Been Appointed to University Diversity Posts

The four African American named to diversity positions are Sheree Ohen at Harvard University, Crystal Williams at Boston University, Belinda Robnett at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and Maria Dixon Hall at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

Study Finds That a Black Doctor Lessens the Infant Mortality Rate for Black Babies

Study Finds That a Black Doctor Lessens the Infant Mortality Rate for Black Babies

New research from the scholars at the University of Minnesota, George Mason University, and Harvard University finds that Black newborns’ in-hospital death rate is a third lower when Black newborns are cared for by Black physicians rather than White physicians.

The New African American Members of the American Philosophical Society

The New African American Members of the American Philosophical Society

This year 28 Americans were elected to the American Philosophical Society. Six of the new members are African Americans.

Harvard University Gallery Creating a Living Archive of the Black Lives Matter Movement

Harvard University Gallery Creating a Living Archive of the Black Lives Matter Movement

The Cooper Gallery of African & African American Art is collecting protest posters, circulated artist zines, informational pamphlets, and any other printed media/functional artwork relating to the movement.

Four Black Scholars Appointed to Endowed Chairs at Major Universities

Four Black Scholars Appointed to Endowed Chairs at Major Universities

The four Black scholars named to endowed chairs are Barbara Ransby at the University Illinois at Chicago, Kiese Laymon at the University of Mississippi. Annette Gordon-Reed at Harvard University, and Wayne A. I. Frederick at Howard University.

Parents Say They Want School Integration But Their Actions Produce Greater Racial Segregation

Parents Say They Want School Integration But Their Actions Produce Greater Racial Segregation

A new study finds that a large percentage of parents express support for greater school integration. But the bad news is that when parents have more control over where to send their children to school, their choices make schools more segregated. 

Harvard University Launches the Black Teacher Archives

Harvard University Launches the Black Teacher Archives

The first phase of the project will archive and digitize the state journals of “Colored Teachers Associations,” which operated for more than 100 years, from 1861 through 1970.

The New President of St. Augustine's University in Raleigh, North Carolina

The New President of St. Augustine’s University in Raleigh, North Carolina

Dr. Irving Pressley McPhail was previously the sixth president and CEO at the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, founding chancellor at the Community College of Baltimore County, president of St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley, and president of Lemoyne-Owen College in Memphis.

Harvard's Danielle Allen Awarded the $500,000 Kluge Prize From the Library of Congress

Harvard’s Danielle Allen Awarded the $500,000 Kluge Prize From the Library of Congress

Danielle S. Allen, a University professor and professor of government who also serves as director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University, has been awarded the John W. Kluge Prize from the Library of Congress. The prize recognizes scholarly achievement in disciplines not covered by the Nobel Prizes.

Ten African Americans Who Have Been Assigned to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Ten African Americans Who Have Been Assigned to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Here is this week’s roundup of African Americans who have been appointed to new administrative positions at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Black Man to Become Dean of the Nation's Oldest Law School

Black Man to Become Dean of the Nation’s Oldest Law School

A. Benjamin Spencer will be the next dean of the William and Mary Law School in Williamsburg, Virginia. When he takes office on July 1, Professor Spencer will be William & Mary’s first African-American dean. Since 2014 he has been on the law school faculty at the University of Virginia.

Three African American Women Faculty Taking on New Assignments

Three African American Women Faculty Taking on New Assignments

Namandje Bumpus was named chair of a department at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Cassandra Extavour was named a Harvard College Professor and associate professor Amoaba Gooden was appointed interim vice president for diversity, equity, and inclusion at Kent State University in Ohio.

Harvard Scholars Present Research on How Racism Affects Public Health

Harvard Scholars Present Research on How Racism Affects Public Health

A group of scholars affiliated with the Project on Race & Gender in Science & Medicine at the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard University have produced a webinar series entitled “Epidemics and the Effects on the African American Community from 1792 to the Present.” 

Study Finds a Significant Racial Disparity in Depression Among Older American Adults

Study Finds a Significant Racial Disparity in Depression Among Older American Adults

Researchers surveyed more than 25,000 adults over the age of 50. They found that members of racial and ethnic minority groups were up to twice as likely to report more severe depressive symptoms than non-Hispanic White participants.

In Memoriam: Lila Althea Fenwick, 1932-2020

In Memoriam: Lila Althea Fenwick, 1932-2020

Lila Fenwick was the first Black woman to graduate from Harvard Law School. She died from complications of the coronavirus on April 4 at her home in New York City.

In Memoriam: Cheryl Ann Wall, 1948-2020

In Memoriam: Cheryl Ann Wall, 1948-2020

Professor Cheryl Wall focused on African-American literature, American literature, and feminist criticism. She first joined the faculty at Rutgers University in 1972. and had planned on retiring this year.

The Next Dean of the University of Connecticut School of Law

The Next Dean of the University of Connecticut School of Law

Eboni S. Nelson currently is associate dean for academic affairs and professor of law at the University of South Carolina School of Law. Before joining the faculty at the University of South Carolina in 2007, she taught at the Thurgood Marshall School of Law at Texas Southern University in Houston.

Harvard University Offers Online Course on the Selma Voting Rights March

Harvard University Offers Online Course on the Selma Voting Rights March

Selma Online is an interactive program that is designed for middle or high school students. The platform uses scenes from Ava DuVernay’s 2014 film Selma as a storyboard to bring the voting rights movement to life

Single-Parents Do Not Impede Educational Success for Blacks as Much as They Do for Whites

Single-Parents Do Not Impede Educational Success for Blacks as Much as They Do for Whites

Black kids face significant obstacles to educational success including poverty, discrimination, racial segregation, etc. The fact that they are more likely to live in a single-parent home than White children does not matter as much as the other obstacles they face.

The Next Dean of the School of Law at George Washington University

The Next Dean of the School of Law at George Washington University

Dayna Bowen Matthew is currently the William L. Matheson and Robert M. Morgenthau Distinguished Professor of Law and the F. Palmer Weber Research Professor of Civil Liberties and Human Rights at the University of Virginia Law School. She will begin her new duties on July 1.

Harry J. Elam Jr. Will Be the Next President of Occidental College in Los Angeles

Harry J. Elam Jr. Will Be the Next President of Occidental College in Los Angeles

Currently, Dr. Elam is vice provost for undergraduate education, vice president for the arts, and senior vice provost for education at Stanford University. He joined the university’s faculty in 1990 as an associate professor in what is now the department of theater and performance studies.

Harvard Business School Alumni Seeks Greater Diversity at Their Alma Mater

Harvard Business School Alumni Seeks Greater Diversity at Their Alma Mater

There are currently 56 African Americans (6.2 percent) in the latest 900-member class at Harvard Business School. At the present time, only two of the 100 tenured faculty members are Black.

Harvard Study Finds That People of Color More Likely to Be Exposed to Ads for Vaping

Harvard Study Finds That People of Color More Likely to Be Exposed to Ads for Vaping

In recent, months there has been a great deal of research published on the dangers of vaping. Exposure to vaping advertisements can increase the likelihood of taking up the habit. A new study by researchers at Harvard University finds that people of color are more likely than Whites to be targeted.

Professor Mildred Robinson Is Retiring After 47 Years of Teaching in Higher Education

Professor Mildred Robinson Is Retiring After 47 Years of Teaching in Higher Education

Mildred Robinson is the Henry L. and Grace Doherty Charitable Foundation Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law. Professor Robinson, who specializes in tax law, was the law school’s first African American female tenured professor.

Black Enrollments at Ivy League Law Schools

Black Enrollments at Ivy League Law Schools

Black students make up at least 11 percent of total enrollments at all five Ivy League law schools. Leading the group is Columbia University in New York where there are 39 Black students out of a total enrollment of 124. Thus, Blacks are 31.2 percent of the total enrollments.

Harvard University Launches a New Intitiative to Examine its Historical Ties to Slavery

Harvard University Launches a New Intitiative to Examine its Historical Ties to Slavery

Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School, and a professor of history, will chair the new initiative which will be called Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery.

Study Charges Harvard With Recruiting Black Applicants Who Have No Chance of Admission

Study Charges Harvard With Recruiting Black Applicants Who Have No Chance of Admission

Essentially, the study charges Harvard with recruiting large number of Black applicants who had no chance of admission so that Black acceptance rates would decline to more closely match those of White and Asian applicants.

Former Harvard Scholar to Lead the National Collaborative for Health Equity

Former Harvard Scholar to Lead the National Collaborative for Health Equity

Gail Christopher was appointed executive director of the National Collaborative for Health Equity. Founded in 2014, the National Collaborative was established to promote health equity through action, leadership, inclusion, and collaboration.

Nine African Americans Who Have Been Appointed to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Nine African Americans Who Have Been Appointed to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Here is this week’s roundup of African Americans who have been appointed to new administrative positions at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Emory University's Vanessa Siddle Walker to Receive the Lilliam Smith Book Award

Emory University’s Vanessa Siddle Walker to Receive the Lilliam Smith Book Award

Vanessa Siddle Walker is the Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of African American Educational Studies at Emory University in Atlanta. Professor Walker will be honored on September 1 at the DeKalb County Public Library.

Harvard Economist Roland Fryer Suspended Without Pay for Two Years

Harvard Economist Roland Fryer Suspended Without Pay for Two Years

Multiple women who worked in his Education Innovation Laboratory had accused Professor Fryer of inappropriate sexual conduct at work that created a hostile work environment. Dr. Fryer has admitted to telling inappropriate jokes at work but denies he created a hostile working environment.

University of Kentucky Alumnus Establishes Scholarship Fund for African Students

University of Kentucky Alumnus Establishes Scholarship Fund for African Students

Esias Bedingar, a native French speaker, came to the University of Kentucky in 2014. He knew no English, but he went on to complete the English as a Second Language program in just one semester. He graduated in May 2018 with a bachelor’s degree in public health.

In Memoriam: Olivia Cousins, 1948-2019

In Memoriam: Olivia Cousins, 1948-2019

Olivia Cousins was a feminist scholar, African American historian, and long-time faculty member at the Borough of Manhattan Community College of the City University of New York. She served on the faculty there for more than 30 years.

Four Black Scholars Elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Four Black Scholars Elected to the National Academy of Sciences

This year’s results are an improvement from recent years. JBHE’s analysis determined that in 2018, there were no African Americans among the 84 new members. In both 2016 and 2017, there was only one African American scholar among the new members.

In Memoriam: Martin Kilson, 1931-2019

In Memoriam: Martin Kilson, 1931-2019

Dr. Kilson first joined the faculty at Harvard in 1962 as a lecturer in government. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1967 and professor of government in 1969, making him the first Black full professor at Harvard.

African Americans Accepted Into the Class of 2023 at High-Ranking Colleges and Universities

African Americans Accepted Into the Class of 2023 at High-Ranking Colleges and Universities

Recently, most of the nation’s highest-ranked colleges and universities informed applicants if they had been accepted for admission into the Class of 2023. Some revealed the racial/ethnic breakdown of their admitted students.