Harvard University related articles

Six Black Scholars Who Have Been Given New Faculty Assignments

Six Black Scholars Who Have Been Given New Faculty Assignments

Taking on new positions are Bianca Baldridge at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Stephen Buckley at Duke University in North Carolina, Joshua Bartholomew at the Saint Paul School of Theology in Kansas, Emily Greenwood at Princeton University in New Jersey, Warrick Moses at Syracuse University in New York, and Charles Peterson at Oberlin College in Ohio.

Western Michigan University Honors Its First Black Bachelor's Degree Recipient

Western Michigan University Honors Its First Black Bachelor’s Degree Recipient

Merze Tate, the first Black student to earn a bachelor’s degree from Western State Teachers College (now Western Michigan University) will have University College – the academic home for exploratory majors – named in her honor.

In Memoriam: Robert Parris Moses, 1935-2021

In Memoriam: Robert Parris Moses, 1935-2021

After winning a MacArthur Foundation “Genius Award” in 1982, Dr. Moses used the fellowship money to begin the Algebra Project, which uses mathematics as an organizing tool for quality education for all children in America involving their parents, teachers, and the community to boost mathematics proficiency.

Eight African Americans Who Will Be Taking on New Administrative Duties

Eight African Americans Who Will Be Taking on New Administrative Duties

Here is this week’s roundup of African Americans who have been appointed to new administrative positions at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Temple University in Philadelphia Names Jason Wingard as Its Next President

Temple University in Philadelphia Names Jason Wingard as Its Next President

In 2015, Dr. Wingard was appointed dean of the School of Continuing Education at Columbia University in New York City. He also held the rank of professor at the school. Previously, Dr. Wingard was the chief learning officer at Goldman Sachs, the Wall Street investment firm.

Higher Education Leads to Better Health, But Not So Much for Black Men

Higher Education Leads to Better Health, But Not So Much for Black Men

Studies show life expectancy is higher for educated Black men — those with a college degree or higher — compared with those who have not finished high school. But the increase is not as big as it is for Whites. The findings suggest that the power of discrimination to harm Black men’s lives may be more persistent than previously understood.

New Study Finds Huge Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Mortality Rates

New Study Finds Huge Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Mortality Rates

Men are more likely to be infected by COVID-19 and have higher death rates. But that data obscures the fact that Black women are up to four times more likely to die of COVID-19 than White men and three times more likely to die from COVID-19 than Asian men.

Three African Americans Who Have Been Appointed to University Administrative Positions

Three African Americans Who Have Been Appointed to University Administrative Positions

Yulander Wells, Jr. has been named deputy athletic director at Harvard University. Enku Gelaye was promoted to senior vice president and dean of campus life at Emory University in Atlanta and Wendell Williams will be the next associate chancellor of enrollment management at Southern Illinois University Carbondale.

New Administrative Appointments in Higher Education for a Quartet of African Americans

New Administrative Appointments in Higher Education for a Quartet of African Americans

Taking on new administrative positions are Laura Colson at Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina, Freddie W. Wills Jr. at Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis, Marie Williams at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, and Victor Clay at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Patricia Ramsey Appointed President of Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn, New York

Patricia Ramsey Appointed President of Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn, New York

Dr. Ramsey, whose appointment is effective May 1, will be the first woman to serve as the president of Medgar Evers College. A biologist by training, she comes to CUNY from the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. Earlier, she was provost and vice president for academic affairs at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania.

Scholars Assemble a Massive New Database on Enslaved People

Scholars Assemble a Massive New Database on Enslaved People

Scholars affiliated with the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard University, the College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland, the MATRIX Center for Digital Humanities & Social Sciences at Michigan State University, and other institutions have established a new open-source database called Enslaved: Peoples of the Historical Slave Trade.

Consortium of Prestigious Academic Institutions to Collaborate on SlaveVoyages.org

Consortium of Prestigious Academic Institutions to Collaborate on SlaveVoyages.org

Emory University in Atlanta will now bring in a group of partners to help it maintain and enhance its SlaveVoyages.org project. The website documents nearly 50,000 transatlantic passages of slave ships between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Professor Cornel West to Rejoin the Faculty at Union Theological Seminary

Professor Cornel West to Rejoin the Faculty at Union Theological Seminary

Cornel West has been appointed to the Dietrich Bonhoeffer Chair at Union Theological Seminary in New York City. Last month, Professor West told Harvard he would leave the university if it did not reconsider its decision to not grant him tenure.

Racial Segregation in Major Cities Is Not Just About Housing

Racial Segregation in Major Cities Is Not Just About Housing

A new study of more than 133 million tweets on Twitter from 2013 to 2015 conducted by researchers at Brown University and Harvard University finds that in most urban areas, people of different races don’t just live in different neighborhoods — they also eat, drink, shop, socialize and travel in different neighborhoods.

How Reparations Would Have Affected the Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Transmissions

How Reparations Would Have Affected the Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Transmissions

A new study led by researchers at Harvard Medical School shows that had reparations for slavery been awarded to African Americans prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the racial disparity in infections, hospitalizations, and death rates due to the virus would have been significantly reduced or eliminated.

Vincent Rougeau Will Be the First African American President of the College of the Holy Cross

Vincent Rougeau Will Be the First African American President of the College of the Holy Cross

Vincent Rougeau has been dean of the Boston College Law School since 2011. Prior to his role at Boston College, Rougeau was a tenured professor of law at Notre Dame Law School and served as their associate dean for academic affairs from 1999-2002.

Harvard's Henry Louis Gates Jr. Honored by the American Academy of Arts & Sciences

Harvard’s Henry Louis Gates Jr. Honored by the American Academy of Arts & Sciences

Professor Gates received the Don M. Randel Award for Humanistic Studies from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The award has been given out only seven times since it was established in 1975.

In Memoriam: Samuel L. Myers Sr., 1919-2021

In Memoriam: Samuel L. Myers Sr., 1919-2021

Dr. Myers served on the faculty at Morgan State University in Baltimore from 1950 to 1963 before going to work for the U.S. State Department. He was appointed the fourth president of Bowie State University in Maryland in 1968 and served in the post until 1977.

Large Group of Black Students Admitted Early to Harvard University

Large Group of Black Students Admitted Early to Harvard University

Harvard University accepted 747 students who applied early from a pool of more than 10,000 early applicants. African Americans constitute 16.6 percent of those admitted early, compared to 12.7 percent last year.

Four African Americans Named Mitchell Scholars

Four African Americans Named Mitchell Scholars

The US-Ireland Alliance recently announced the 12 members of the George J. Mitchell Scholar Class of 2022. Four of the 12 Mitchell Scholars this year are African Americans.

L. Song Richardson Will Be the Next President of Colorado College

L. Song Richardson Will Be the Next President of Colorado College

Richardson, who is of African American and Korean descent, currently is the dean and chancellor’s professor of law at the University of California, Irvine School of Law. When she was appointed to that post in January 2018, she was the only woman of color to lead a top-30 law school.

Emery Brown Awarded the Swartz Prize for Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience

Emery Brown Awarded the Swartz Prize for Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience

Emery N. Brown is the Edward Hood Taplin Professor of Medical Engineering and Computational Neuroscience at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also serves as the Warren M. Zapol Professor at Harvard Medical School and is a practicing anesthesiologist.

University of Georgia Online Guest Lecture Zoombombed With Racial Slurs and Threats

University of Georgia Online Guest Lecture Zoombombed With Racial Slurs and Threats

The approximately 40-minute lecture by Dr. Garcia Peña of Harvard University discussed how the killing of Black Dominican feminists, in an attempt to silence their activism, was countered by the kinship and community networks of the larger Afro-Dominican Diaspora.

University of Chicago's Eve Ewing Honored at the Iowa City Book Festival

University of Chicago’s Eve Ewing Honored at the Iowa City Book Festival

Eve Ewing is an assistant professor at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. The Paul Engle Prize honors writers who demonstrate a pioneering spirit in the world of literature and a commitment to engaging with the issues of the day.

Harvard Business School Renames Building to Honor Its First Black Tenured Faculty Member

Harvard Business School Renames Building to Honor Its First Black Tenured Faculty Member

James I. Cash was the first African American to earn a basketball scholarship at Texas Christian University. After earning a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in computer science at Purdue University, Dr. Cash joined the faculty at Harvard Business School in 1976. He became the first Black tenured faculty member in 1985.

Four African American Women Who Have Been Appointed to University Diversity Posts

Four African American Women Who Have Been Appointed to University Diversity Posts

The four African American named to diversity positions are Sheree Ohen at Harvard University, Crystal Williams at Boston University, Belinda Robnett at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and Maria Dixon Hall at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

Study Finds That a Black Doctor Lessens the Infant Mortality Rate for Black Babies

Study Finds That a Black Doctor Lessens the Infant Mortality Rate for Black Babies

New research from the scholars at the University of Minnesota, George Mason University, and Harvard University finds that Black newborns’ in-hospital death rate is a third lower when Black newborns are cared for by Black physicians rather than White physicians.

The New African American Members of the American Philosophical Society

The New African American Members of the American Philosophical Society

This year 28 Americans were elected to the American Philosophical Society. Six of the new members are African Americans.

Harvard University Gallery Creating a Living Archive of the Black Lives Matter Movement

Harvard University Gallery Creating a Living Archive of the Black Lives Matter Movement

The Cooper Gallery of African & African American Art is collecting protest posters, circulated artist zines, informational pamphlets, and any other printed media/functional artwork relating to the movement.

Four Black Scholars Appointed to Endowed Chairs at Major Universities

Four Black Scholars Appointed to Endowed Chairs at Major Universities

The four Black scholars named to endowed chairs are Barbara Ransby at the University Illinois at Chicago, Kiese Laymon at the University of Mississippi. Annette Gordon-Reed at Harvard University, and Wayne A. I. Frederick at Howard University.

Parents Say They Want School Integration But Their Actions Produce Greater Racial Segregation

Parents Say They Want School Integration But Their Actions Produce Greater Racial Segregation

A new study finds that a large percentage of parents express support for greater school integration. But the bad news is that when parents have more control over where to send their children to school, their choices make schools more segregated. 

Harvard University Launches the Black Teacher Archives

Harvard University Launches the Black Teacher Archives

The first phase of the project will archive and digitize the state journals of “Colored Teachers Associations,” which operated for more than 100 years, from 1861 through 1970.

The New President of St. Augustine's University in Raleigh, North Carolina

The New President of St. Augustine’s University in Raleigh, North Carolina

Dr. Irving Pressley McPhail was previously the sixth president and CEO at the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, founding chancellor at the Community College of Baltimore County, president of St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley, and president of Lemoyne-Owen College in Memphis.

Harvard's Danielle Allen Awarded the $500,000 Kluge Prize From the Library of Congress

Harvard’s Danielle Allen Awarded the $500,000 Kluge Prize From the Library of Congress

Danielle S. Allen, a University professor and professor of government who also serves as director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University, has been awarded the John W. Kluge Prize from the Library of Congress. The prize recognizes scholarly achievement in disciplines not covered by the Nobel Prizes.

Ten African Americans Who Have Been Assigned to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Ten African Americans Who Have Been Assigned to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Here is this week’s roundup of African Americans who have been appointed to new administrative positions at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Black Man to Become Dean of the Nation's Oldest Law School

Black Man to Become Dean of the Nation’s Oldest Law School

A. Benjamin Spencer will be the next dean of the William and Mary Law School in Williamsburg, Virginia. When he takes office on July 1, Professor Spencer will be William & Mary’s first African-American dean. Since 2014 he has been on the law school faculty at the University of Virginia.