Columbia University related articles

Six African Americans Who Have Been Appointed to Higher Education Administrative Posts

Six African Americans Who Have Been Appointed to Higher Education Administrative Posts

Taking on new administrative duties are Gerald Lewis Jr. at Columbia University in New York City, Kristie L. Kenney at Talladega College in Alabama, Karen Wright at Fort Valley State University in Georgia, Michelle Nichols at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Ariel Aponte at Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina, and Monique Carroll at Chicago State University.

Three African American Scholars Who Have Been Appointed Deans

Three African American Scholars Who Have Been Appointed Deans

Josef Sorett will be the next dean of Columbia College in New York. Akilah Carter-Francique was appointed dean of Education, Health, and Human Services at Benedict College in Columbia, South Carolina, and Nathaniel Whitaker, has been named interim dean of the College of Natural Sciences at the University of Massachusetts.

African American Scholar is the First Faculty Hire for the Columbia Climate School

African American Scholar is the First Faculty Hire for the Columbia Climate School

Kristina G. Douglass was the Joyce and Doug Sherwin Early Career Professor in the Rock Ethics Institute and assistant professor of anthropology and African studies at Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Douglass’ research focuses on investigating human-environment interaction in Madagascar.

Universities Announce the Appointments of Four African Americans to Dean Positions

Universities Announce the Appointments of Four African Americans to Dean Positions

The four new deans are Tracey Weldon at the University of South Carolina, Jelani Cobb at Columbia Journalism School in New York City, Stacy L. Jones at the University of Alabama, and James Sattrfeld Jr. at Boise State University in Idaho.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Two African Americans Among the Eight Winners of the 2022 Windham-Campbell Prizes

Two African Americans Among the Eight Winners of the 2022 Windham-Campbell Prizes

Administered by Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, the awards are conferred annually to eight authors writing in English anywhere in the world. Two of this year’s winners are African American women with ties to the academic world.

Barbara Ransby Selected to Receive an Award From the Caribbean Philosophical Association

Barbara Ransby Selected to Receive an Award From the Caribbean Philosophical Association

University of Illinois Chicago historian Barbara Ransby has been named a recipient of the Caribbean Philosophical Association’s Frantz Fanon Lifetime Achievement Award. She was selected for the award “because of the historical and political importance of her writings, her tireless work as an institution-builder and activist.”

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Kimberlé Crenshaw Receives the Top Honor From the Association of American Law Schools

Kimberlé Crenshaw Receives the Top Honor From the Association of American Law Schools

Kimberlé W. Crenshaw is the Promise Institute Professor of Human Rights at the School of Law at the University of California, Los Angeles and the Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law at Columbia University. She was honored by the Association of American Law Schools for her work on critical race theory and intersectionality.”

Black or African American? Labels Can Impact People's Perceptions of Ideology

Black or African American? Labels Can Impact People’s Perceptions of Ideology

A new study led by researchers at Emory University in Atlanta, the University of Southern California, and Columbia Business School shows that White Americans associate the label “Blacks” with being targets of racial bias more than the label “African Americans.”

Morgan State University's Wayne Dawkins Honored by the News Leader Association

Morgan State University’s Wayne Dawkins Honored by the News Leader Association

Wayne Dawkins, professor of professional practice in the School of Global Journalism & Communication at Morgan State University, is the 2021 recipient of the Barry Bingham Sr. Fellowship. The award, given in recognition of an educator’s outstanding efforts to encourage students of color in the field of journalism.

Seven African Americans Taking on New Administrative Roles at Universities

Seven African Americans Taking on New Administrative Roles at Universities

The new appointees are Timothy Hatchett at Fort Valley State University in Georgia, Santee Ezell at Mississippi State University, Erica Alexander at Howard University, Mea E. Ashley at Mississippi University for Women, Letitia C. Wall at Winston-Salem State University, Laiya Thomas at Marquette University in Milwaukee, and Jacqueline Blackett at Columbia University in New York.

Experiment in Problem Solving Finds Whites Pay Less Attention to the Ideas of Their Black Peers

Experiment in Problem Solving Finds Whites Pay Less Attention to the Ideas of Their Black Peers

Researchers from Columbia University and the University of Texas at Dallas gave a puzzle to a diverse group of participants. Each person was able to see how their peers solved the same puzzle and could choose whether to learn from them. They found that participants were 33 percent more likely to pay attention to and learn from White peers compared to Black ones.

School of Journalism & Graphic Communication at Florida A&M University Names Its Next Dean

School of Journalism & Graphic Communication at Florida A&M University Names Its Next Dean

Mira Lowe, a veteran journalist and editor, has been assistant dean for student experiences at the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications since 2019. Before entering academia, Lowe enjoyed a successful career as a professional journalist.

Five Black Faculty Members Who Are Taking on New Assignments in Higher Education

Five Black Faculty Members Who Are Taking on New Assignments in Higher Education

Takin on new duties are Dennis Mitchell at Columbia University, Nandi A. Marshall at Georgia Southern University, Allison Leggett at the University of California, Los Angeles, Bryan Dewsbury at Florida International University in Miami, and Djamali Muhoza at the University of Arkansas at Monticello.

Will Urban Gentrification Lead to More Integrated Public Schools?

Will Urban Gentrification Lead to More Integrated Public Schools?

A new study from the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education at Teachers College of Columbia University, found that some schools in the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens have seen a reduction in racial segregation while neighborhoods have experienced increased diversity since the early 2000s.

Upward Economic Mobility for African Americans Is Rarer Than Most People Believe

Upward Economic Mobility for African Americans Is Rarer Than Most People Believe

A new study by researchers at Ohio State University and Columbia University finds that Americans consistently believe that poor African Americans are more likely to move up the economic ladder than is actually the case.

Temple University in Philadelphia Names Jason Wingard as Its Next President

Temple University in Philadelphia Names Jason Wingard as Its Next President

In 2015, Dr. Wingard was appointed dean of the School of Continuing Education at Columbia University in New York City. He also held the rank of professor at the school. Previously, Dr. Wingard was the chief learning officer at Goldman Sachs, the Wall Street investment firm.

Report Presents a Plan to Get More Black Adults Back to College to Earn Their Credentials

Report Presents a Plan to Get More Black Adults Back to College to Earn Their Credentials

Community colleges can play an important role in helping tBlack adults get back to work through certificate and degree programs that lead to better jobs. But, the report’s authors state that colleges need to pay attention to the specific needs of adult students of color as they design programs to boost workers’ skills for today’s labor market.

University of Virginia's School of Architecture Names Malo A. Hutson as Its Next Dean

University of Virginia’s School of Architecture Names Malo A. Hutson as Its Next Dean

Dr. Hutson is currently a tenured professor and director of the Urban Planning Ph.D. Program in the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at Columbia University in New York City. He is also the director of the school’s Urban Community and Health Equity Lab.

In Memoriam: Tobe Johnson

In Memoriam: Tobe Johnson

Tobe Johnson taught at Morehouse College in Atlanta for 59 years before retiring in 2018 from his role as Avalon professor and chair of the political science department. He is the longest-serving faculty member in the school’s 150-year history.

Howard and Columbia Universities to Collaborate on Black Studies Book Series

Howard and Columbia Universities to Collaborate on Black Studies Book Series

An editorial board of eight faculty – four each from Howard University and Columbia University – will oversee the new series. Acquisitions for two to three publications per year in the new series will begin immediately. Funding is currently being sought to expand the program to publish up to 20 titles per year.

C. Andrew McGadney Named the 20th President of Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois

C. Andrew McGadney Named the 20th President of Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois

Dr. McGadney currently serves as vice president and dean of student advancement at Colby College in Waterville, Maine. Prior to coming to Colby, Dr. McGadney was vice president for university advancement at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

In Memoriam: Leith Patricia Mullings, 1945-2020

In Memoriam: Leith Patricia Mullings, 1945-2020

After teaching for six years at Columbia University, Dr. Mullings joined the faculty at the City University of New York in 1983. There she eventually became a distinguished professor of anthropology at the City University of New York’s Graduate Center.

In Memoriam: David Norton Dinkins, 1927-2020

In Memoriam: David Norton Dinkins, 1927-2020

David Dinkins was the 106th mayor of New York City and the first African American to lead the city. He also was a professor in the practice of public policy at the School of Public and International Affairs at Columbia University.

Francine Conway Is the New Provost at Rutgers University in New Jersey

Francine Conway Is the New Provost at Rutgers University in New Jersey

A native of Guyana, Dr. Conway had been serving as dean of the Graduate School of Applied Psychology. She was the first Black scholar to hold that position. Dr. Conway joined the faculty at Rutgers in 2016 after teaching for 13 years at Adelphi University in Garden City, New York.

Columbia University to Remove the Name of a Slave Owner From a Campus Building

Columbia University to Remove the Name of a Slave Owner From a Campus Building

Samuel Bard was a significant physician in the 18th century, a pioneer in obstetrics and treating diphtheria, who served as George Washington’s doctor. Dr. Bard also owned at least three slaves.

Four African Americans Scholars Who Are Taking on New Roles in Higher Education

Four African Americans Scholars Who Are Taking on New Roles in Higher Education

The four African American scholars who are beginning new assignments are Josef Sorett at Columbia University in New York City, Lerone A. Martin at Washington University in St. Louis, Jessica T. DeCuir-Gunby at North Carolina State University, and Kristopher A. Oliveira at the University of Kansas.

Three African Americans Who Are Stepping Down From University Positions

Three African Americans Who Are Stepping Down From University Positions

Stepping down from their posts are Dana Canedy, administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes at the Columbia University School of Journalism, Donzell Lee, dean of graduate studies at Alcorn State University in Mississippi, and Alfonza Carter director of athletics at Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Howard University Teams Up With Columbia Uinversity to Explore the Issue of Reparations

Howard University Teams Up With Columbia Uinversity to Explore the Issue of Reparations

The U.S. African American Redress Network aims to better understand how communities are addressing historic racial transgressions. It also expects to increase awareness of redress efforts across different regions and fields such as activism, academia, and policy-making.

Black Historian at Columbia University Stopped in Vermont and Told to Leave State

Black Historian at Columbia University Stopped in Vermont and Told to Leave State

Professor Christopher Brown, who drives a car with New York State license plates, was flagged down by a White man in Hartford, Vermont, where Dr. Brown’s family owns a home. He was advised that he was not wanted in Vermont and told to leave.

The New Dean of the School of Continuing and Professional Studies at DePaul University in Chicago

The New Dean of the School of Continuing and Professional Studies at DePaul University in Chicago

Tatum Thomas currently serves as senior associate dean of student affairs at Columbia University’s School of Professional Studies. Prior to her current role, she served as the director of academic services at New York University’s School of Professional Studies.

Three Black Women Named Winners of National Book Critics Circle Awards

Three Black Women Named Winners of National Book Critics Circle Awards

Each year, the National Book Critics Circle presents awards for the finest books published in English in six categories: Fiction, Nonfiction, Biography, Autobiography, Poetry, and Criticism. Three of the six winning authors this year are Black women. Each has some ties to higher education.

In Memoriam: Katherine Williams Phillips, 1972-2020

In Memoriam: Katherine Williams Phillips, 1972-2020

Katherine W. Phillips was the Reuben Mark Professor of Organizational Character and the director of Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. Center for Leadership and Ethics at the business school at Columbia University in New York City.

Black Enrollments at Ivy League Law Schools

Black Enrollments at Ivy League Law Schools

Black students make up at least 11 percent of total enrollments at all five Ivy League law schools. Leading the group is Columbia University in New York where there are 39 Black students out of a total enrollment of 124. Thus, Blacks are 31.2 percent of the total enrollments.