Columbia University related articles

The Progress of the Ivy League in Admitting Black Students

The Progress of the Ivy League in Admitting Black Students

A decade ago, there were 1,110 Black students in the entering classes at the eight Ivy League schools. In 2016, there are 1,503, a 35 percent increase. Four of the eight Ivy League schools have an entering class that is more than 11 percent Black. A decade ago, the leader stood at 9.6 percent.

The New Chief Diversity Officer at Empire State College in New York

The New Chief Diversity Officer at Empire State College in New York

Elliott Dawes has been named the inaugural chief diversity officer for institutional equity and inclusion at Empire State College in Saratoga Springs, New York, a campus of the State University of New York System. He will be based in the college’s New York City offices.

University of Delaware Professor Honored by the Association of Black Women Historians

University of Delaware Professor Honored by the Association of Black Women Historians

Erica Armstrong Dunbar, the Blue and Gold Professor of Black American Studies and History at the University of Delaware, is the winner of the Lorraine A. Williams Leadership Award from the Association of Black Women Historians.

Major New Program Aimed a Combating Racism in South Africa and the United States

Major New Program Aimed a Combating Racism in South Africa and the United States

The non-residential program, hosted by Columbia University and funded by the Atlantic Philanthropies, will support 350 fellows over its 10-year lifespan, annually supporting up to 35 fellows from the United States and South Africa.

Columbia University to Open a New Wellness Center in West Harlem

Columbia University to Open a New Wellness Center in West Harlem

The new Wellness Center will house the Community Health Worker Stroke Prevention program and the Mental Health First Aid program. The Wellness Center will also provide free blood pressure readings and cholesterol tests.

Kimberlé Crenshaw to Receive the Gittler Prize From Brandeis University

Kimberlé Crenshaw to Receive the Gittler Prize From Brandeis University

The Gittler Prize is presented annually to a person whose body of published work reflects scholarly excellence and makes a lasting contribution to racial, ethnic or religious relations. Professor Crenshaw, who is on the faculty at the law schools of Columbia University and UCLA, will receive the award and a $25,000 prize in October 2017.

Paul Beatty Wins the 2016 Man Booker Prize

Paul Beatty Wins the 2016 Man Booker Prize

Paul Beatty, who teaches at Columbia University in New York, is not only the first African American to win the distinguished award, he is the first American to do so.

Barbara Ransby Elected President of the National Women's Studies Association

Barbara Ransby Elected President of the National Women’s Studies Association

Barbara Ransby is the Distinguished Professor of African American studies, gender and women’s studies, and history at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her two-year term as president will begin at the conclusion of the association’s annual conference in Montreal in November.

In Memoriam: Benjamin Franklin Payton, 1932-2016

In Memoriam: Benjamin Franklin Payton, 1932-2016

Dr. Payton served as president of Tuskegee University in Alabama from 1981 to 2010. Earlier in his career, Dr. Payton was president of Benedict College in Columbia, South Carolina.

Three Black Academics Awarded MacArthur Foundation Fellowships

Three Black Academics Awarded MacArthur Foundation Fellowships

Of this year’s 23 MacArthur Fellows, four are African Americans and three have current ties to the academic world.

Two African American Scholars Honored With Prestigious Awards

Two African American Scholars Honored With Prestigious Awards

Rickey Laurentiis was selected as the winner of the 2016 Levis Reading Prize presented by Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, and Bridgette Peteet, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Cincinnati, was honored by the American Psychological Foundation.

Angela Flournoy to Receive the 2016 Cabell First Novelist Award

Angela Flournoy to Receive the 2016 Cabell First Novelist Award

The Cabell First Novelist Award is presented by Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa, The New School, and Columbia University.

Black Americans in the 2016 Class of Truman Scholars

Black Americans in the 2016 Class of Truman Scholars

This year, 54 Truman scholars were selected from 775 candidates nominated by 305 colleges and universities. Of this year’s 54 Truman Scholars, it appears that nine, or 16.7 percent, are Black Americans.

In Memoriam: James Bell, 1925-2016

In Memoriam: James Bell, 1925-2016

After teaching at several HBCUs, James Bell joined the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona in 1968. Four years later, he was the first African American to be appointed a vice president in the California State University System.

Claude Steele Stepping Down From Provost Position at the University of California, Berkeley

Claude Steele Stepping Down From Provost Position at the University of California, Berkeley

Claude Steele was appointed executive vice chancellor and provost at the University of California, Berkeley in 2014. He is stepping aside to deal with the health problems of his wife. He will remain at Berkeley as a professor of psychology.

Two African American Academics Win National Book Critic Circle Awards

Two African American Academics Win National Book Critic Circle Awards

This year, two of the six winners of the National Book Critics Circle Awards are African Americans with current academic affiliations. They are Ross Gay who teaches in the creative writing program at Indiana University and Margo Jefferson who teaches at Columbia University and The New School.

Camille A. Nelson Named Dean of the Law School at American University

Camille A. Nelson Named Dean of the Law School at American University

Professor Nelson was dean of the Suffolk University Law School in Boston from 2010 to 2015. Earlier, she taught at the law school of Saint Louis University. A native of Jamaica, Professor Nelson was the first Black woman to clerk for Canada’s highest court.

New $48 Million Scholarship Program for African Americans in STEM Fields

New $48 Million Scholarship Program for African Americans in STEM Fields

The Fund II Foundation of Austin, Texas, led by Robert F. Smith, founder and CEO of Vista Equity Partners, has teamed up with the United Negro College Fund to establish a $48 million scholarship program for African Americans in STEM fields.

Columbia University Makes David Dinkins Archive Available to Researchers

Columbia University Makes David Dinkins Archive Available to Researchers

The archives includes 10 hours of oral history interviews with Professor Dinkins as well as speeches, fundraising letters, campaign materials, position papers, and correspondence. He was the first and only African American mayor of New York City.

Professor Kimberlé Crenshaw Honored by the American Bar Foundation

Professor Kimberlé Crenshaw Honored by the American Bar Foundation

Kimberlé W. Crenshaw, a professor of law at Columbia University and a professor of law at the University of California, Los Angeles, will receive the Outstanding Scholar Award from the Fellows of the American Bar Foundation.

New Faculty Appointments at Major Universities for Five Black Scholars

New Faculty Appointments at Major Universities for Five Black Scholars

Taking on new roles are Debra J. Barksdale at Virginia Commonwealth University, Michael A. Nutter at Columbia University, Theaster Gates at the University of Chicago, Chris Swan at Tufts University, and Engda Hagos at Colgate University.

Study Finds Racial Gap in Salaries of Business School Graduates

Study Finds Racial Gap in Salaries of Business School Graduates

The data showed that Black and White graduates of business schools earned similar salaries in their first jobs after graduating from business school. But six to eight years after leaving business schools a significant racial gap had opened up.

African American Finalists for the National Book Critics Circle Awards

African American Finalists for the National Book Critics Circle Awards

The National Book Critics Circle Awards are given out in six categories with five finalists in each category. Several of the finalists are African Americans who currently hold academic posts at American colleges and universities.

Black First-Year Students at the Nation’s Leading Research Universities

Black First-Year Students at the Nation’s Leading Research Universities

Slightly more than a decade ago in 2004, only two of the nation’s highest-ranked universities had incoming classes that were more than 10 percent Black. This year there are eight.

Two Black Women Named Postdoctoral Fellows at the University of Maryland Baltimore County

Two Black Women Named Postdoctoral Fellows at the University of Maryland Baltimore County

Three women make up the third cohort of the Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Black women are two of this year’s three fellows: Keisha McIntosh Allen in education and Nkiru Nnawulezi in psychology.

Two Major Research Universities Join the Creating Connections Consortium

Two Major Research Universities Join the Creating Connections Consortium

The Creating Connections Consortium seeks to increase the number of underrepresented minorities who are hired to tenure-track faculty positions. The University of Chicago and the University of Michigan are the consortium’s newest members.

In Memoriam: Walter Wallace, 1927-2015

In Memoriam: Walter Wallace, 1927-2015

Walter Wallace taught sociology at Princeton University for 30 years. At Princeton, Professor Wallace was the faculty adviser for the senior thesis of Michelle Robinson, who is now First Lady of the United States.

Prudence Carter Appointed Dean of the Graduate School of Education at Berkeley

Prudence Carter Appointed Dean of the Graduate School of Education at Berkeley

Dr. Carter currently serves as the Jacks Family Professor of Education and the faculty director of the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities at Stanford University.

Vanderbilt Honors the Man Who Integrated Southeastern Conference Athletics

Vanderbilt Honors the Man Who Integrated Southeastern Conference Athletics

Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, is establishing the Perry E. Wallace Scholarship to honor the first African American to play a varsity sport in the Southeastern Conference.

How Anti-Affirmative Action Admissions Laws Impact Campus Diversity Efforts

How Anti-Affirmative Action Admissions Laws Impact Campus Diversity Efforts

The authors found a reluctance by administrators who are charged with diversity missions at universities prohibited from using race in admissions decisions to deal specifically with race in their efforts to create a more welcoming campus.

Higher Mortality Rates for All Races in Communities With High Levels of Racial Prejudice

Higher Mortality Rates for All Races in Communities With High Levels of Racial Prejudice

The data showed that communities with a higher level of anti-Black prejudice had a death rate for people of all races that averaged 24 percent higher than in communities with low levels of racial prejudice.

Jennifer Baszile Named Director of the Consortium on High Achievement and Success

Jennifer Baszile Named Director of the Consortium on High Achievement and Success

Jennifer L. Baszile was named director of the nation’s oldest and largest organization dedicated to the success of underrepresented students on liberal arts college campuses nationwide. She previously served on the faculty at the University of Connecticut and Yale University.

In Memoriam: Mary Lynn Jones Walker Huntley, 1946-2015

In Memoriam: Mary Lynn Jones Walker Huntley, 1946-2015

Lynn Walker Huntley served as president of the Southern Education Foundation from 2002 to 2010. Earlier she was an attorney for the Legal Defense Fund and a deputy assistant attorney general in the civil rights division of the U.S. Department of Justice.

Barnard College Scholar Co-Authors the Libretto for a New Opera

Barnard College Scholar Co-Authors the Libretto for a New Opera

Yvette Christianse, a professor of English and Africana studies at Barnard College in New York City, is the co-author of the libretto for the opera Cities of Salt that debuted recently at the Royal Opera House in London.

Tracy Smith to Lead the Creative Writing Program at Princeton University

Tracy Smith to Lead the Creative Writing Program at Princeton University

Professor Smith has taught creative writing at the university since 2005. Earlier, she taught at Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York, the University of Pittsburgh, and Columbia University. In 2012, she won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry.

Claudia Rankine to Join the Faculty at the University of Southern California

Claudia Rankine to Join the Faculty at the University of Southern California

Claudia Rankine was appointed to the Aerol Arnold Chair of English in the Dornsife College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Professor Rankin will begin teaching at the University of Southern California in the fall of 2016.