Research & Studies

How the COVID-19 Pandemic Has Impacted Black Enrollments in Higher Education

How the COVID-19 Pandemic Has Impacted Black Enrollments in Higher Education

A new report from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center finds that Black undergraduate enrollments are down 8.8 percent from the spring 2020 semester. But African American enrollments in graduate programs are up 10.4 percent, more than double the increase for Whites.

Faculty at HBCUs Face a Large Pay Gap Compared to Their Peers at Predominently White Institutions

Faculty at HBCUs Face a Large Pay Gap Compared to Their Peers at Predominently White Institutions

A new report from the National Education Association finds a large pay gap for faculty who teach at historically Black colleges and universities compared to their colleagues at predominantly White institutions. Faculty teaching at HBCUs earned $69,180, on average, compared to $87,384 for faculty at non-HBCUs.

The Racial Gap in Voter Participation Has Increased in the Last Two Presidential Elections

The Racial Gap in Voter Participation Has Increased in the Last Two Presidential Elections

In 2012, when President Obama was locked in what was thought to be a very close election contest with Mitt Romney, the voting rate for African Americans was higher than the rate for Whites for the first time in American history. Since that time, the racial gap in voter participation has returned.

Study Finds a Large Racial Trust Gap on College Campuses Across the United States

Study Finds a Large Racial Trust Gap on College Campuses Across the United States

A new study by Kevin Fosnacth, an associate research scientist at Indiana University, and Shannon M. Calderone an assistant professor of educational leadership at Washington State University, finds that Black college students put far less trust in university officials than their White peers.

The Percentage of All Doctors Who Are Black Men Has Made No Progress in 80 Years

The Percentage of All Doctors Who Are Black Men Has Made No Progress in 80 Years

In 1940, 2.8 percent of physicians in the United States were Black. Almost all were men. By 2018, 5.4 percent of U.S. physicians were Black — 2.6 percent were Black men. Thus, the percentage of all physicians who were Black men made no progress in nearly 80 years.

The Racial Gap In Gifted Education Programs Is Not Only About Access

The Racial Gap In Gifted Education Programs Is Not Only About Access

Many studies have shown that Black students are far less likely than their White peers to be selected for gifted education programs. But a new study shows that even when Black students are admitted into these programs they are less likely to benefit from gifted education than White students.

Black Faculty Are Vastly Underrepresented at Southern Colleges and Universities

Black Faculty Are Vastly Underrepresented at Southern Colleges and Universities

The Southern Regional Education Board has released new data that shows only 9.2 percent of full- and part-time faculty members are Black at public four-year institutions in the 16-state region. Nearly 18 percent of all undergraduate students at these educational institutions are African Americans.

Study Finds That Black Women Faculty Perceive Unfairness in Workloads and Recognition

Study Finds That Black Women Faculty Perceive Unfairness in Workloads and Recognition

The study found that women of color are more likely to be asked to do service, especially around diversity issues. And they perceive that their departments are less likely to credit their important work through departmental rewards systems than White men.

New Survey of IT Professionals Documents Perceptions of Racism in the High-Tech Sector

New Survey of IT Professionals Documents Perceptions of Racism in the High-Tech Sector

Dice, the leading database for technology professionals, managing over 9 million profiles in the United States, recently released a new survey that examines perceptions of racism and discrimination in the high-tech industry by employees who work in the field.

Diversity Efforts More Likely to Be Supported When They Are Seen to Benefit White Students

Diversity Efforts More Likely to Be Supported When They Are Seen to Benefit White Students

A new study by scholars in the department of psychology at Princeton University in New Jersey finds that the rationale for greater diversity in higher education often reflects the views of Whites but not necessarily those of Blacks.

Pew Research Center Report Documents Racial Gap in STEM Degree Attainment and Employment

Pew Research Center Report Documents Racial Gap in STEM Degree Attainment and Employment

Black students earned 7 percent of STEM bachelor’s degrees as of 2018, the most recent year data is available. This is below their share of all bachelor’s degrees (10 percent) or their share of the adult population (12 percent). Black adults are also underrepresented among those earning advanced degrees in STEM.

Report Finds De Facto Racial Segregation in Virginia's Public Universities

Report Finds De Facto Racial Segregation in Virginia’s Public Universities

At the University of Virginia, just 13 percent of undergraduates identified as Black or Hispanic; that share is 60 percent lower than the state’s population ages 18 to 24. The College of William & Mary and Christopher Newport University are near large Black population centers but each of their student bodies is just 7 percent Black.

School Integration Was Not Always a Good Thing for Black Educational Attainment, Study Finds

School Integration Was Not Always a Good Thing for Black Educational Attainment, Study Finds

A new study by economists at Washington and Lee University, the New School, and Duke University finds that Black adults who attended racially balanced high schools in the mid-20th century completed significantly less schooling than those who attended either predominantly Black or predominantly White schools.

African Americans Are Making Progress in Degree Attainments But the Racial Equity Gap Remains

African Americans Are Making Progress in Degree Attainments But the Racial Equity Gap Remains

A new study from the Center for American Progress finds that for the first time in American history, half of the young adults in the United States have earned a college degree. However, there hasn’t been a great deal of progress in closing the large and persistent racial equity gap.

Excess Deaths Due to the Pandemic Have Been the Highest in the African American Community

Excess Deaths Due to the Pandemic Have Been the Highest in the African American Community

More than a quarter of the excess deaths during the pandemic were not from the virus itself but the result of not seeking or finding adequate care in an emergency such as a heart attack, experiencing fatal complications from a chronic disease such as diabetes, or facing a behavioral health crisis that led to suicide or drug overdose.

Black Students in STEM and Health Graduate Programs Increase But a Large Racial Gap Remains

Black Students in STEM and Health Graduate Programs Increase But a Large Racial Gap Remains

New data from the National Science Foundation show that in pre-pandemic America enrollments in graduate programs in science, engineering, and health fields at U.S. academic institutions were increasing. The increase in Black enrollments in these disciplines increased faster than the rate for enrollments as a whole.

New Report Exposes Widespread Academic Racism at Pennsylvania State University

New Report Exposes Widespread Academic Racism at Pennsylvania State University

The new report presents the results of a survey of Black professors at the main and satellite campuses of Penn State regarding their experiences with racism, on the institutional and interpersonal levels, perpetrated by students, colleagues, administrators as well as the academic culture in which they work.

UCLA Analysis Finds Another Racial Health Disparity During the COVID-19 Pandemic

UCLA Analysis Finds Another Racial Health Disparity During the COVID-19 Pandemic

The study found that during the pandemic, African Americans may have had worse access than Whites to outpatient care and thus were less likely to avoid hospitalizations for non-COVID-19–related conditions. This increased African Americans’ risk of hospital-acquired infections, the researchers say.

Black Women Who "Hunker Down" in High Violence Areas Have Altered Genes in Immune Cells

Black Women Who “Hunker Down” in High Violence Areas Have Altered Genes in Immune Cells

The chronic stress of living in neighborhoods with high rates of violence and poverty alters gene activity in immune cells, according to a new study of low-income single Black mothers on the South Side of Chicago conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, the University of Kentucky and the University of California, Los Angeles.

Scholars Assemble a Massive New Database on Enslaved People

Scholars Assemble a Massive New Database on Enslaved People

Scholars affiliated with the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard University, the College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland, the MATRIX Center for Digital Humanities & Social Sciences at Michigan State University, and other institutions have established a new open-source database called Enslaved: Peoples of the Historical Slave Trade.

Universities Use Software That Assigns Race as a High Impact Predictor of Student Success or Failure

Universities Use Software That Assigns Race as a High Impact Predictor of Student Success or Failure

The study, from the nonprofit newsroom The Markup, found that more than 500 universities across the country use risk algorithms to evaluate their students. The analysis found “large disparities in how the software treats students of different races, and the disparity is particularly stark for Black students, who were deemed high risk at as much as quadruple the rate of their White peers.”

Who is Doing a Better Job at Social Distancing, Blacks or Whites?

Who is Doing a Better Job at Social Distancing, Blacks or Whites?

The Center for Economic and Social Research at the University of Southern California has released a new report on how Americans are dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic. The report breaks down several survey responses by racial and ethnic group. Results show that Black Americans take social distancing far more seriously than White Americans.

Yale University Study Looks to End Racial Bias in Emergency Room Treatment

Yale University Study Looks to End Racial Bias in Emergency Room Treatment

A new study led by Isaac Agboola, a third-year emergency room resident at Yale New Haven Medical Center, examines how bias influences emergency department treatment, particularly decisions over which patients must be restrained and/or sedated.

Study Examines Racial Differences in Students’ Experiences in Campus Housing

Study Examines Racial Differences in Students’ Experiences in Campus Housing

After interviewing campus housing administrators, staff, and students at three major universities, Zak Foste of the University of Kansas found that students of color who lived in predominantly White facilities commonly reported not feeling welcome, being uncomfortable with roommates, and avoiding spending time in their residence.

Charter Schools' Impact on Racial Segregation in K-12 Education

Charter Schools’ Impact on Racial Segregation in K-12 Education

According to the study, led by a sociologist at Cornell University, the average district to expand charter school enrollment between 2000 and 2010 experienced a 12 percent increase in White-Black school segregation and a 2 percent decrease in White-Black residential segregation.

COVID Almost Eliminated the Black-White Unemployment Rate Gap, But Now It's Back

COVID Almost Eliminated the Black-White Unemployment Rate Gap, But Now It’s Back

For many decades the Black unemployment rate has traditionally been double the rate for Whites.  This racial gap existed in both good economic times and bad with only slight fluctuations in the ratio. After the pandemic hit, the Black rate was only 1.2 times the rate for Whites. Since then the racial gap has reappeared.

Whites Still Hold a Disproportionate Number of Head Coaching Positions in College Sports

Whites Still Hold a Disproportionate Number of Head Coaching Positions in College Sports

Among the most startling statistics in the new report from The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida is that while Blacks are more than 53 percent of the athletes in Division I basketball, African Americans are 22.7 percent of the head coaches, down from 25.2 percent 15 years ago.

Black Students' Mental Health Impacted More by Online Racism Than In-Person Encounters

Black Students’ Mental Health Impacted More by Online Racism Than In-Person Encounters

Researchers at Boston College and the University of Connecticut have authored a new study that finds that college students of color who encounter online racism can experience real and significant mental health impacts – even more significant than in-person encounters of racial discrimination.

Census Study Shows a Small Increase in the Racial Gap in Bachelor's Degree Attainments Since 2005

Census Study Shows a Small Increase in the Racial Gap in Bachelor’s Degree Attainments Since 2005

For the years 2015 to 2019, on average 21.6 percent of African Americans over the age of 25 held a bachelor’s degree. For non-Hispanic Whites, the figure was 35.8 percent. This racial gap is slightly large than was the case in the period from 2005 to 2009.

Racial Segregation in Major Cities Is Not Just About Housing

Racial Segregation in Major Cities Is Not Just About Housing

A new study of more than 133 million tweets on Twitter from 2013 to 2015 conducted by researchers at Brown University and Harvard University finds that in most urban areas, people of different races don’t just live in different neighborhoods — they also eat, drink, shop, socialize and travel in different neighborhoods.

Non-Virus Related Deaths During the Pandemic Also More Likely to Impact African Americans

Non-Virus Related Deaths During the Pandemic Also More Likely to Impact African Americans

As with the deaths that were directly caused by the virus, those linked to unemployment have taken a disproportionate toll on Black people, especially those with the least education. Black people make up 12 percent of the working-age population, but they comprised 19 percent of the projected excess deaths due to higher unemployment during the pandemic.

The Racial Gap in College Enrollments of Recent High School Graduates

The Racial Gap in College Enrollments of Recent High School Graduates

For non-Hispanic White high school graduates in 2019, 47.9 percent had enrolled in four-year colleges and universities by October of that year. For 2019 Black high school graduates, less than 32 percent had enrolled in four-year colleges and universities by the ensuing fall.

How Reparations Would Have Affected the Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Transmissions

How Reparations Would Have Affected the Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Transmissions

A new study led by researchers at Harvard Medical School shows that had reparations for slavery been awarded to African Americans prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the racial disparity in infections, hospitalizations, and death rates due to the virus would have been significantly reduced or eliminated.

Academic Study Examines Reluctance of Older African Americans to Seek Mental Health Care

Academic Study Examines Reluctance of Older African Americans to Seek Mental Health Care

A new study by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond and the University of Maryland finds that older African Americans living in U.S. counties with a higher population of Black residents are less likely to pursue mental health treatment than other African American seniors.

In the United States, a Greater Percentage of Blacks Are Enrolled in School Than Whites

In the United States, a Greater Percentage of Blacks Are Enrolled in School Than Whites

For African Americans over the age of 3, there were 11,551,000 students enrolled in school in October 2019. They made up 28.0 percent of the total Black population age 3 or over. For Whites only 20.5 percent of the population 3 and over were enrolled in school.

COVID-19's Disparate Impact on the Education of Young Black Students

COVID-19’s Disparate Impact on the Education of Young Black Students

In examining the results of third grade students on standardized tests, the authors found that between the fall of 2019 and the fall of 2020 the proportion of students reaching the previous promotion minimum score declined by 13.8 percentage points for Black students and 5.8 percentage points for White students.