Research & Studies

Black Students' Scores on the ACT Test Continue to Fall and the Racial Gap Widens

Black Students’ Scores on the ACT Test Continue to Fall and the Racial Gap Widens

In a year when many test dates were postponed or canceled due to the global pandemic and when many colleges and universities made standardized test scores optional, the persistent racial gap in scores on the ACT college entrance examination grew wider. Whites were more than five times as likely as Blacks to be prepared for college-level work in all four areas of English, math, science, and reading.

A Snapshot of African American Enrollments in Graduate School After the Onset of the Pandemic

A Snapshot of African American Enrollments in Graduate School After the Onset of the Pandemic

In the fall of 2020, 53,754 African Americans enrolled in graduate school for the first time. African Americans made up 12.3 percent of all first-time graduate enrollees from the United States in 2020. Of these, 69.4 percent were women.

The Lingering Effects of the Federal Government's Redlining of Black Neighborhoods

The Lingering Effects of the Federal Government’s Redlining of Black Neighborhoods

Beginning in the 1930s and 40s, the federal government delineated areas where mortgages could be insured. These redlining policies, which remained in effect until the 1960s, led to decades of community disinvestment, concentrated poverty in inner-city neighborhoods, and denied residents the ability to build intergenerational wealth through homeownership. Health impacts remain to this day.

The Large Racial Gap in Home Internet Access in the Rural South

The Large Racial Gap in Home Internet Access in the Rural South

A new report from the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies finds that in the Black rural South, 25.8 percent of residents lack the option to subscribe to high-speed broadband compared to 8.8 percent of non-southern rural residents and 3.8 percent of all Americans. Even where broadband is available in the Black rural South, many find it unaffordable.

Study Finds Differences in Perception of Mental Health Providers' Cultural Competence

Study Finds Differences in Perception of Mental Health Providers’ Cultural Competence

A new study by researchers at Yale University, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, and Vanderbilt University finds that patients who identify as racial and ethnic minorities prefer medical providers who share and understand their culture, but those patients are not as likely as others to access providers who can provide such care.

African Americans Are Making Slow Progress in Closing the Racial Gap in Investments

African Americans Are Making Slow Progress in Closing the Racial Gap in Investments

Researchers examined investment account ownership across more than 80,000 households of differing racial and ethnic backgrounds over a six-year period. They found only about a quarter of African American adults owned a taxable investment account, and more than half owned no investments of any kind.

A Snapshot of African American Enrollments in Private K-12 Schools in the United States

A Snapshot of African American Enrollments in Private K-12 Schools in the United States

Of the more than 4.6 million students enrolled in private schools in the United States in 2019, 9.4 percent were Black or African American. Blacks made up a greater percentage of students in smaller private schools and in private schools in urban areas.

Yale University Study Finds Racial Bias in Emergency Room Procedures

Yale University Study Finds Racial Bias in Emergency Room Procedures

A new paper by researchers at Yale University finds racial disparities in the use of physical restraints on children who are admitted to the hospital emergency department. Black children are significantly more likely than White children to be subdued with restraints during visits to emergency rooms.

New Study Find that Systemic Racism May Effect the Safety of the Food Supply Chain

New Study Find that Systemic Racism May Effect the Safety of the Food Supply Chain

A new study by researchers at the University of Houston found a significant disparity in the quality and safety of food available in low- versus high-income communities. The results may explain – at least in part –  the high levels of gastrointestinal illness in predominantly Black urban neighborhoods.

The Persistent Black-White Poverty Gap Hinders African American Access to Higher Education

The Persistent Black-White Poverty Gap Hinders African American Access to Higher Education

In 2020, 17.4 percent of all Black families were living in poverty. The government defines the poverty rate for a four-person family – two adults and two children – as having an annual income of less than $26,646. For non-Hispanic White families, only 5.7 percent were living below the poverty threshold.

Adding Ethnic Studies to High School Curricula Improves Performance and Graduation Rates

Adding Ethnic Studies to High School Curricula Improves Performance and Graduation Rates

In one California school district, ninth graders with a grade-point average of 2.0 or under were automatically enrolled in an ethnic study course. The research showed that enrollment in ethnic studies substantially increased high school graduation, attendance, and the probability of enrolling in college.

Experiment in Problem Solving Finds Whites Pay Less Attention to the Ideas of Their Black Peers

Experiment in Problem Solving Finds Whites Pay Less Attention to the Ideas of Their Black Peers

Researchers from Columbia University and the University of Texas at Dallas gave a puzzle to a diverse group of participants. Each person was able to see how their peers solved the same puzzle and could choose whether to learn from them. They found that participants were 33 percent more likely to pay attention to and learn from White peers compared to Black ones.

The Racial Income Gap Narrowed in 2020, But There is Still a Long Way on the Road to Equality

The Racial Income Gap Narrowed in 2020, But There is Still a Long Way on the Road to Equality

In 2020, the median Black household income was 61.2 percent of the median income of non-Hispanic White families. This is an increase from 59.7 percent in 2019. However, with only minor fluctuations, the racial gap in median income has remained virtually unchanged for more than a half-century.

Emory University Study Finds Racial Disparities in Heart Condition Among College Football Players

Emory University Study Finds Racial Disparities in Heart Condition Among College Football Players

The study found no racial differences in concentric left ventricular hypertrophy among college football athletes that played on the offensive or defensive lines. But for skilled position players – quarterbacks, receivers, and running backs – a higher percentage of Black collegiate football players were more likely to develop concentric left ventricular hypertrophy than White football players.

New Data Shows the Effect of the Pandemic of Black Enrollments in Higher Education

New Data Shows the Effect of the Pandemic of Black Enrollments in Higher Education

There were 2,331,529 Black or African American students enrolled in higher education last fall. In the fall of 2019, there were 2,474,200 Black students enrolled. Thus, Black enrollments were down nearly 6 percent. This is four times the drop for students as a whole. In 2010, more than 3 million Black students were enrolled in higher education.

Racial Differences in Employment and Educational Attainment of College Graduates a Decade Later

Racial Differences in Employment and Educational Attainment of College Graduates a Decade Later

For students who graduated from college in the 2007-8 academic year, Whites, on average, were more likely than Blacks to hold full-time jobs and worked more hours per week a decade later. The average salary for Whites who had full-time jobs was $82,170. For African American college graduates who had full-time jobs, the average salary was $65,104.

Blacks More Likely to Take Advantage of Optional Test-Score Reporting During the Pandemic

Blacks More Likely to Take Advantage of Optional Test-Score Reporting During the Pandemic

Most colleges and universities were test-optional this past year due to the pandemic but some students still reported their scores. Only 31 percent of students from underrepresented minority groups reported test scores this past year, compared to 43 percent of all students who used the Common App.

The FBI Releases New Data on Hate Crimes in the United States

The FBI Releases New Data on Hate Crimes in the United States

There were 224 hate crimes in elementary or secondary schools that were reported to the FBI in 2020. There were only 116 reported hate crimes on college campuses. But remember that a large majority of college campuses were shut down for a good portion of the year due to the pandemic.

Report Examines Racial and Gender Differences in California Higher Educational Attainments

Report Examines Racial and Gender Differences in California Higher Educational Attainments

The Campaign for College Opportunity found improvements in degree completions for Black Californias at all levels of the state higher education system. But the data also shows there are major gaps between not only Blacks and Whites but also Black men and Black women.

African American College Students Subjected to Racial Discrimination at Risk for Alcohol Abuse

African American College Students Subjected to Racial Discrimination at Risk for Alcohol Abuse

Studies have shown that African American college students are less likely than their White peers to participate in binge drinking. But a new study has found that for those African American college students who are subjected to racial discrimination, they are more likely to exhibit depressive symptoms and engage in problem alcohol consumption. 

Census Report Examines Racial Gap in Episodic and Chronic Poverty Rates

Census Report Examines Racial Gap in Episodic and Chronic Poverty Rates

Chronic poverty is defined as being below the poverty income threshold for the entire four years that were surveyed. Some 5.6 percent of the U.S. Black population was poor for the entire four-year period. This was true for only 1.7 percent of the non-Hispanic White population.

Survey Finds Widespread Student Support for Diversity Initiatives in Higher Education

Survey Finds Widespread Student Support for Diversity Initiatives in Higher Education

Nearly half of surveyed students believe that their school should require all students, faculty, and staff to participate in DEI training. An additional 46 percent of respondents believe that their schools should require all students to participate in a semester-long course on the history and root causes of the unequal distribution of wealth, opportunities, and privileges in society.

Survey Examines the Views of HBCU Students on the Issues of Free Speech

Survey Examines the Views of HBCU Students on the Issues of Free Speech

HBCU students are much more likely than the national sample to favor limits on the press’ First Amendment rights to cover campus protests. Fifty-six percent of HBCU students — double the percentage in the national sample — think college students should be able to prevent reporters from covering campus protests.

2020 Census Data on Race and Ethnicity of the Population of the United States

2020 Census Data on Race and Ethnicity of the Population of the United States

The Some Other Race alone or in combination group (49.9 million) increased 129 percent, surpassing the Black or African American population (46.9 million) as the second-largest race alone or in combination group.

Study Identifies the Whitest Corner of the STEM World

Study Identifies the Whitest Corner of the STEM World

There has been no progress in geoscience Ph.D. degrees in racial and ethnic diversity in 40 years. There has been an increase of racial and ethnic diversity at the bachelor’s degree level but most of this is the result of a larger number of Hispanic graduates. Blacks make up just 3 percent of bachelor’s degree awards.

Pew Research Center Reports Show a Great Divide on the Status of Racial Progress

Pew Research Center Reports Show a Great Divide on the Status of Racial Progress

The American public is deeply divided over how far the nation has progressed in addressing racial inequality – and how much further it needs to go. Nearly 60 percent of Black adults say that the nation’s laws and major institutions need to be completely rebuilt because they are fundamentally biased. Only 18 percent of White adults agreed.

Heritage Foundation Report Claims a Bloat of Diversity Officers in Higher Education

Heritage Foundation Report Claims a Bloat of Diversity Officers in Higher Education

Just as conservatives have mounted attacks on ethnic studies programs, critical race theory, and other subject areas not to their liking, the hiring of diversity officers has also been highly criticized. A new Heritage Foundation report finds what it calls an administrative bloat of diversity officers.

Study Finds Black Girls Are Treated With Indifference and Cruelty in Urban Classrooms

Study Finds Black Girls Are Treated With Indifference and Cruelty in Urban Classrooms

In the elementary and middle schools of a large metropolitan school district that were studied, Black and immigrant girls of color experienced gendered racial harassment, erasure of intellect, and estrangement within their communities. This included the verbal abuse of Black and immigrant girls of color by mostly White teachers.

Will Urban Gentrification Lead to More Integrated Public Schools?

Will Urban Gentrification Lead to More Integrated Public Schools?

A new study from the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education at Teachers College of Columbia University, found that some schools in the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens have seen a reduction in racial segregation while neighborhoods have experienced increased diversity since the early 2000s.

Marketing Efforts of For-Profit Colleges Disproportionately Target Black Communities

Marketing Efforts of For-Profit Colleges Disproportionately Target Black Communities

A new study by the Student Borrower Protection Center finds that predatory for-profit schools are disproportionately targeting communities of color. Majority-Black zip codes are over 75 percent more likely to have a for-profit college than zip codes that are not majority Black.

The Educational Challenges of Rural African American Families During the COVID-19 Shutdown

The Educational Challenges of Rural African American Families During the COVID-19 Shutdown

The researchers noted that “many parents (a) lacked the technical expertise with the technologies their children were using such as Zoom and in the material children were learning and (b) had no access to training and support from professionals. Some parents lacked dependable broadband/Wi-Fi.

Black Heart Attack Victims Who Live In High-Poverty Areas Are Less Likely to Survive Five Years

Black Heart Attack Victims Who Live In High-Poverty Areas Are Less Likely to Survive Five Years

The study found that Black patients from disadvantaged neighborhoods were significantly more likely to die within 5 years of surviving a heart attack than White patients. In contrast, there was no difference in rates of death between White patients and Black patients who lived in well-resourced neighborhoods.

The Huge Racial Disparity in Passage Rates on the Architect Registration Examination

The Huge Racial Disparity in Passage Rates on the Architect Registration Examination

For the first time, the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards has released demographic data on passage rates for its Architect Registration Examination, which is required for licensure throughout the United States. The passage rate for Blacks was significantly lower than the rate for Whites on the six sections of the examination.

Black Urban Areas Are Much Hotter Than White City Neighborhoods in the Summer

Black Urban Areas Are Much Hotter Than White City Neighborhoods in the Summer

In 71 percent of the counties studied, land surface temperatures in communities with higher rates of poverty were up to 4 degrees Celsius, or 7 degrees Fahrenheit warmer, compared to the richest neighborhoods during the summer months.

New Report Shows That Black Women Have a Wider Pay Gap With Men Than White Women

New Report Shows That Black Women Have a Wider Pay Gap With Men Than White Women

In 2019, men had a median income of $57,456, while women had a median income of $47,299 — a wage gap of 18 percent. Based on recent progress, the AAUW report calculates that White women will reach pay parity with men by the year 2069. But for Black women, the trend suggests that they won’t reach wage parity until 2369, nearly 250 years from now.

Hate Crimes Continue to Plague College and University Campuses

Hate Crimes Continue to Plague College and University Campuses

In 2018, of the more than 34,000 criminal incidents that occurred on the campuses of postsecondary institutions and were reported to police or security agencies, 814 incidents were classified as hate crimes. Race was the motivating bias in 43 percent of reported hate crimes.