Black Studies

Northwestern University's New Exhibition Will Showcase Art From Medieval African Kingdoms

Northwestern University’s New Exhibition Will Showcase Art From Medieval African Kingdoms

“Caravans of Gold, Fragments in Time: Art, Culture, and Exchange Across Medieval Saharan Africa” is the first major exhibit to highlight West Africa’s global reach in the medieval period. Many of the items in the exhibit have never been seen before in the United States.

Tulane University Researchers Launch Sexual Health Website Aimed at Young Black Men

Tulane University Researchers Launch Sexual Health Website Aimed at Young Black Men

Researchers from Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans have created the Check It website, which is specifically designed for young Black men to promote sexual health and screening for sexually transmitted diseases, including chlamydia.

Florida State University Launches a New Civil Rights Institute

Florida State University Launches a New Civil Rights Institute

The mission of the new institute is to honor and study the United States civil rights movement and to promote civil rights and social change. It will host speakers and events, curate museum exhibits, develop an interactive website and publications, and support education and research.

Princeton University's Tera Hunter Wins Book Awards From the American Historical Association

Princeton University’s Tera Hunter Wins Book Awards From the American Historical Association

Tera W. Hunter, the Edwards Professor of History and professor of African American studies at Princeton University in New Jersey, has been awarded the Joan Kelly Memorial Prize in women’s history and/or feminist theory as well as the Littleton-Griswold Prize in U.S. law and society from the American Historical Association.

Columbia University on Verge of Creating an African American and Diaspora Studies Department

Columbia University on Verge of Creating an African American and Diaspora Studies Department

Pending a final vote of approval from the board of trustees, this new department will be the first independent department established solely for African-American studies at Columbia University.

Princeton University Library Establishes Collection of African-American Newspapers

Princeton University Library Establishes Collection of African-American Newspapers

The Princeton University Library has established a collection of current newspapers published for African American audiences throughout the United States. The new collection contains printed copies of 72 newspapers from various cities and towns in 32 states.

University of New Mexico Creates an Africana Studies Advisory Team

University of New Mexico Creates an Africana Studies Advisory Team

The group will support administrative efforts that will lead to department status for the Africana studies program and identify and engage funding sources to support the academic, research, and public/community service projects of Africana studies.

Rutgers University-Newark Acquires the Archives of Jazz Legend Count Basie

Rutgers University-Newark Acquires the Archives of Jazz Legend Count Basie

The Count Basie Collection includes his pianos, Hammond organ, photos, correspondence, concert programs, business records, housewares and press clippings. Nearly 1,000 artifacts are included in the collection.

Michigan State University's New Critical Race Studies Residency Program

Michigan State University’s New Critical Race Studies Residency Program

The new program will bring an artist-in-residence and a designer-in-residence to campus with the goal of enriching the life of student experiences and the greater community by facilitating practices of inclusion through art and design.

University of Oregon Unveils Plans for Its Black Cultural Center

University of Oregon Unveils Plans for Its Black Cultural Center

The $2.2 million center has has been designed to accommodate an array of activities, including studying, student meetings, academic support and even small classes. The center also will showcase cultural pieces and artwork that celebrate Black heritage.

Washington State University to Form the School of Languages, Cultures and Race

Washington State University to Form the School of Languages, Cultures and Race

Washington State University has announced plans to combine the departments of foreign languages and cultures, the department of critical cultures, gender and race studies and the interdisciplinary programs in humanities and social sciences to form the new School of Languages, Culture and Race.

University of Montana's New Online Archive of Black Criminal Justice History in the State

University of Montana’s New Online Archive of Black Criminal Justice History in the State

The timeline, which includes entries from 1864 to 2018, includes archival photos, interpretive commentary and hundreds of individuals and events. The timeline was produced by Julia Sherman, a graduate of the University of Montana’s African American studies program.

Only One HBCU on the List of the "50 Most Amazing College Museums"

Only One HBCU on the List of the “50 Most Amazing College Museums”

College Rank recently published its list of the “50 Most Amazing College Museums.” Only one museum at a historically Black college or university made the list; the Howard University Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

University of New Mexico Creates a Living/ Learning Community on the Black Experience

University of New Mexico Creates a Living/ Learning Community on the Black Experience

Living/learning communities have been shown to improve student success at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

New Black Issues in Philosophy Blog Now Available Online

New Black Issues in Philosophy Blog Now Available Online

A new blog series produced by an editorial team in the philosophy department at the University of Connecticut, is being featured on the website of the American Philosophical Association. Lewis Gordon, a professor of philosophy, is the executive editor.

New Research Verifies Glass Was Manufactured in Africa Before the Arrival of Europeans

New Research Verifies Glass Was Manufactured in Africa Before the Arrival of Europeans

Abidemi Babatunde Babalola, a visiting fellow at Harvard University with a Ph.D. in anthropology from Rice University in Houston, finds that that glass was being produced in sub-Saharan Africa as early as the 11th century, well before the arrival of Europeans.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice Debuts an Online Archive on Slavery in New York

John Jay College of Criminal Justice Debuts an Online Archive on Slavery in New York

The new online archive includes more than 35,000 records. The index includes census records, slave trade transactions, cemetery records, birth certifications, manumissions, ship inventories, newspaper accounts, private narratives, legal documents and many other sources.

Tuskegee University to Develop a Minor Program in African American Studies

Tuskegee University to Develop a Minor Program in African American Studies

The new, multidisciplinary African-American studies program is a collaborative project between the university’s Robert R. Taylor School of Architecture and Construction Science and the department of history and political science in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Harvard University Acquires Massive Drawing by Kara Walker

Harvard University Acquires Massive Drawing by Kara Walker

Harvard University has acquired a collage of drawings by contemporary artist Kara Walker entitled “U.S.A. Idioms.” The collage is the largest work in the more than 250,000 works held by Harvard University.

Emory University Acquires a Collection of Letters Written by Barack Obama in His 20s

Emory University Acquires a Collection of Letters Written by Barack Obama in His 20s

Rosemary Magee, director of the Rose Library at Emory University, stated the letters “reveal the search of a young man for meaning and identity. While intimate in a philosophical way, they reflect primarily a college student coming to terms with himself and others.”

The University of Virginia Establishes the Center on Race and Public Education in the South

The University of Virginia Establishes the Center on Race and Public Education in the South

The new center is being led by Derrick Alridge, a professor in the Curry School of Education at the university. Professor Alridge also is the director of “Teachers in the Movement,” an oral history project that explores the ideas and pedagogy of teachers during the civil rights movement.

African American Studies Granted Departmental Status at the University of Virginia

African American Studies Granted Departmental Status at the University of Virginia

The Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies at the University of Virginia was established in 1981. Now, 36 years later it has been granted departmental status allowing it to function autonomously to develop curriculum and hire faculty.

Two Black Scholars Named Calvin Bland Fellows at the University of Pennsylvania

Two Black Scholars Named Calvin Bland Fellows at the University of Pennsylvania

The University of Pennsylvania has announced the first cohort of Calvin Bland Fellows. The fellows, all members of the university’s faculty, will conduct research on boys and young men of color. Two of the three new Calvin Bland fellows are African Americans.

University of Illinois Acquires the Papers of Poet, Educator, and Publisher Haki Madhubuti

University of Illinois Acquires the Papers of Poet, Educator, and Publisher Haki Madhubuti

The Rare Book and Manuscript Library at the University of Illinois has acquired the papers of poet Haki Madhubuti and the archives of the Third World Press, the oldest independent Black-owned publisher in the United States.

Public Theology and Racial Justice Collaborative Launched at Vanderbilt Divinity School

Public Theology and Racial Justice Collaborative Launched at Vanderbilt Divinity School

Under the initiative, the Divinity School will bring scholars, students, activists and public servants to Nashville for the next three years to work through the collaborative on programs to eradicate racism and all of its reciprocal forms of injustice and hatred.

Harvard-Based Journal on Africa and the Diaspora Is Printed Once Again in Africa

Harvard-Based Journal on Africa and the Diaspora Is Printed Once Again in Africa

The journal Transition was founded in 1961 in Kampala, Uganda, and became an important voice of Black intellectual thought as the continent transitioned from colonial rule to independence. For the past quarter century, the journal has been housed at Harvard University.

University of California, Merced Debuts New Major in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies

University of California, Merced Debuts New Major in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies

The major has four interdisciplinary core classes, including a capstone/senior thesis course, along with various electives. Faculty members from affiliated programs will offer a host of other courses that students can take to fulfill additional major and elective requirements.

University of Montana Black Studies Scholar Looks to Raise Awareness With 500-Mile Bike Trek

University of Montana Black Studies Scholar Looks to Raise Awareness With 500-Mile Bike Trek

Tobin Miller Shearer, an associate history professor and director of the African American studies program at the University of Montana, is about to embark on a 500-mile bicycle trip through the mountains of Montana in an effort to raise awareness of issues important to African Americans.

University of Montana Graduates Its First African American Studies Majors

University of Montana Graduates Its First African American Studies Majors

The African-American studies program at the University of Montana is the third oldest in the nation and will celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2018. But until now, students could not major in the subject.

University of Cincinnati Researchers Produce a Racial Diversity Map of the Entire Nation

University of Cincinnati Researchers Produce a Racial Diversity Map of the Entire Nation

The map shows how the racial makeup of neighborhoods changed between 1990 and 2010. Users can zoom in to focus on a particular state, city, or even neighborhood. The maps are so detailed that information can be found for any 30-square-meter area in the country.

The New Center on Race, Inequality, and the Law at New York University

The New Center on Race, Inequality, and the Law at New York University

According to the university, lawyers today cannot fully understand the American legal landscape without studying the relationship between race, ethnicity, and economic inequality.

New Black Cultural Center Dedicated at the University of Wisconsin

New Black Cultural Center Dedicated at the University of Wisconsin

The new Black Cultural Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison will serve as a venue for programming, community organizing, and academic activities related to Black culture.

Hamilton College's Oral Histories of Jazz Greats Made Available Online

Hamilton College’s Oral Histories of Jazz Greats Made Available Online

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the first jazz recording, Hamilton College in Clinton, New York, has established a YouTube channel where it will share oral history interviews from its extensive Jazz Archive.

A New African Art Exhibition at Oberlin College in Ohio

A New African Art Exhibition at Oberlin College in Ohio

Oberlin College, the highly rated liberal arts educational institution in Ohio, recently dedicated a new African art installation at its Allen Memorial Art Museum. The museum has 107 African art objects in its collection.

Niagara University Establishes a New Center on Race and Equality

Niagara University Establishes a New Center on Race and Equality

The Rose Bente Lee Ostapenko Center for Race, Equality and Mission will be focused on research and integrating issues of race and equality into the teaching/learning environment at Niagara University.

University of Kansas to Develop Curriculum for Teaching About the 1967 Riots

University of Kansas to Develop Curriculum for Teaching About the 1967 Riots

The three-week seminar, entitled “Teaching the Long Hot Summer of 1967 and Beyond,” will allow 30 high school teachers to develop lesson plans for teaching about this period of civil rights history.