Two Black Scholars Taking on New Faculty Roles

Two Black Scholars Taking on New Faculty Roles

Jonathan Howard is a new assistant professor of English at Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, and Koffi Pierre Yao was hired as an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Delaware.

University of Arkansas Pine Bluff Offers New Degree Program at Satellite Campus

University of Arkansas Pine Bluff Offers New Degree Program at Satellite Campus

The University of Arkansas Pine Bluff has revived its bachelor’s degree program in regulatory sciences. The degree program will be offered at the university’s satellite campus in North Little Rock. The first students will begin classes in the Spring 2018 semester.

Notable Honors for Two African American Women in Academia

Notable Honors for Two African American Women in Academia

M. Shawn Copeland, a professor of theology at Boston College, was presented with the Marianist Award from the University of Dayton and Mary Jo Fayoyin, dean of library services at Savannah State University was honored by the American Library Association.

Texas Southern University to Use New Technology to Identify At-Risk Students

Texas Southern University to Use New Technology to Identify At-Risk Students

The technology will be used to create customized models using real-time student data to identify at-risk students. Academic advisors can then use the software to be proactive in assisting students who need special attention.

A Trio of African American Women Who Are Taking on New Higher Education Administrative Roles

A Trio of African American Women Who Are Taking on New Higher Education Administrative Roles

Taking on new administrative roles are Krystal Prime Banfield at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, Bridgette A. Bryant at the City University of New York, and Carol Burton at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, North Carolina.

In Memoriam: Perry Eugene Wallace Jr., 1948-2017

In Memoriam: Perry Eugene Wallace Jr., 1948-2017

Perry Wallace, who served on the faculty of several law schools, was the first African American to play varsity basketball in the Southeastern Conference.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Ten African Americans Selected as Rhodes Scholars

Ten African Americans Selected as Rhodes Scholars

In the past, the Rhodes Trust did not disclose the race or ethnicity of the scholars selected. But this year the Rhodes Trust stated in its press release that there were “10 African-Americans, the most ever elected in a U.S. Rhodes class.”

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

The Digital Divide May Be Contributing to the Racial Gap in Health Disparities

The Digital Divide May Be Contributing to the Racial Gap in Health Disparities

Scientists at the University of Kansas are studying the barriers keeping low-income African-American older adults from adopting technology and seeking health information online. They found that digital literacy skills represented more of a barrier to online healthcare resources than access to digital technology.

University of Chicago Honors a Pioneering African American Alumna

University of Chicago Honors a Pioneering African American Alumna

The University of Chicago recently unveiled a bust of Georgiana Rose Simpson that sits on a pedestal in the Reynolds Club, the student center on campus. Dr. Simpson is widely considered as the first African American woman to earn a Ph.D.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

University of Maryland Outlines New Procedures for Dealing With Incidents of Hate or Bias

University of Maryland Outlines New Procedures for Dealing With Incidents of Hate or Bias

The new protocol is aimed at ensuring a coordinated response, providing support to impacted community members and guaranteeing transparency with the campus community. The university’s Office of Diversity & Inclusion will hire a hate-bias response coordinator to assist with these efforts.

Colby College President's House Named to Honor a Former Slave

Colby College President’s House Named to Honor a Former Slave

Samuel Osbourne, born into slavery in Virginia in 1833, came to Maine after the Civil War and served as a janitor at the college for 37 years. His daughter was the first African American woman to graduate from Colby College.

Two HBCUs Will Participate in the Diversifying Art Museum Leadership Initiative

Two HBCUs Will Participate in the Diversifying Art Museum Leadership Initiative

The art museums at Clark Atlanta University and Fisk University in Nashville, will receive grants from the Ford Foundation and the Walton Family Foundation for programs to foster greater diversify in museum leadership positions.

African American Presence Among Study Abroad Students Continues to Rise

African American Presence Among Study Abroad Students Continues to Rise

According to new data from the Institute of International Education, 325,339 American students studied at foreign institutions of higher education during the 2015-16 academic year. Of these, 5.9 percent were African Americans. A decade earlier, only 3.5 percent of study abroad students were African Americans.

Larry Robinson Appointed the 12th President of Florida A&M University

Larry Robinson Appointed the 12th President of Florida A&M University

Dr. Robinson has been serving as interim president of the university, a role he had taken on twice before. Over the years, he has served in a number of posts including provost and vice president of academic affairs and director of the Environmental Sciences Institute.

How Medical Research Can Widen Racial Health Disparities

How Medical Research Can Widen Racial Health Disparities

African-Americans are three times as likely to be diagnosed and two times more likely than White Americans to die from multiple myeloma. Yet, most scientific research on the disease has been based on people of European descent.

Stanford University Student Wins the Jamaican Rhodes Scholarship

Stanford University Student Wins the Jamaican Rhodes Scholarship

Jelani Munroe, a recent graduate of Stanford University, was awarded the Jamaican Rhodes Scholarship for 2018. Beginning this fall, he will study for a master’s degree in development studies at Oxford University.

Major Study Finds Racial Gap in Tobacco Use and Tobacco-Related Health Disparities

Major Study Finds Racial Gap in Tobacco Use and Tobacco-Related Health Disparities

Smoking cigarettes and the use of other tobacco products had declined significantly in the United States over the past several decades. But tobacco-related health disparities persist for African Americans and other ethnic groups.

Oregon State to Rename Buildings So as Not to Honor Those Who Supported Slavery

Oregon State to Rename Buildings So as Not to Honor Those Who Supported Slavery

Edward Ray, president of Oregon State University in Corvallis, has announced that the university will change the names of three buildings on campus because the people for whom the buildings have been named had expressed support for the institution of slavery.

In Memoriam: Joseph L. White, 1932-2017

In Memoriam: Joseph L. White, 1932-2017

Often referred to as the Father of Black Psychology, Joseph L. White taught at the University of California, Irvine from 1969 to 1994.

Fayetteville State University Makes Appointment to an Endowed Chair

Fayetteville State University Makes Appointment to an Endowed Chair

Fayetteville State University, the historically Black educational institution in North Carolina, has announced that Ron Carter has been named the Felton J. Capel Professor of Performing and Fine Arts at the university.

New Administrative Positions in Higher Education for Four African Americans

New Administrative Positions in Higher Education for Four African Americans

The appointees are Shontay Delalue at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, Julius Korley at the University of Delaware, Kevin Marbury at the University of Oregon, and Tineke Battle at Pennsylvania State University.

A New Faculty Development Initiative Debuts at the University of Arkansas Pine Bluff

A New Faculty Development Initiative Debuts at the University of Arkansas Pine Bluff

The goal of the faculty development initiative is to encourage faculty members to make changes to their teaching styles with a strong sense of the knowledge of how both themselves and the learners will benefit from enhanced learning opportunities.

Stretch of Interstate 85 in North Carolina Named to Honor John Hope Franklin

Stretch of Interstate 85 in North Carolina Named to Honor John Hope Franklin

Now, nearly nine years after the death of one of the most prolific and respected historians of the twentieth century, a section of Interstate 85 near Durham, North Carolina, has been designated the Dr. John H. Franklin Highway.

A Shake-Up in Student Affairs at Elizabeth City State University

A Shake-Up in Student Affairs at Elizabeth City State University

Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina announced that it has dismissed Nolan Davis as senior associate vice chancellor for student affairs. Valerie L. Holmes, associate vice chancellor of student affairs, will lead the division until an interim director is named.

Four African American Women Taking on New Faculty Roles

Four African American Women Taking on New Faculty Roles

The four Black women appointed to new faculty positions are LaShanda Korley at the University of Delaware, Alison Curseen at Boston College, Sonya Clark at Virginia Commonwealth University, and Rizvana Bradley at Yale University.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Music Legend Sonny Rollins Endows a Jazz Ensemble at Oberlin College

Music Legend Sonny Rollins Endows a Jazz Ensemble at Oberlin College

Beginning in spring 2018, Oberlin jazz studies majors may audition for the Oberlin Sonny Rollins Jazz Ensemble. Students selected must dedicate at least two semesters to performing in the ensemble. They must also complete a winter-term project that embodies Rollins’ spirit of giving.

Vanderbilt University's Second Annual Report on Diversity Measures and Progress

Vanderbilt University’s Second Annual Report on Diversity Measures and Progress

The university made offers for 61 faculty positions. Of these 45 were accepted. A third of these were members of minority groups and 58 percent were women. More than a quarter of all students entering Ph.D. programs in education and graduate programs in the Divinity School are from underrepresented groups.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Students From Sub-Saharan African Nations at U.S. Colleges and Universities, 2016-17

Students From Sub-Saharan African Nations at U.S. Colleges and Universities, 2016-17

The Institute for International Education reports that in the 2015-16 academic year, there were 37,735 students from sub-Saharan Africa enrolled at colleges and universities in the United States. The number of students from sub-Saharan Africa was up 6.7 percent from the prior year.

A Smaller But Still Significant Racial Gap in Home Computer Use

A Smaller But Still Significant Racial Gap in Home Computer Use

In 2015, 88 percent of non-Hispanic White households had a computer in the home. For Blacks, only 80.1 percent of all households had a home computer. Thus, nearly one in five Black households did not have a home computer.

Two African American Women Assuming New Faculty Positions

Two African American Women Assuming New Faculty Positions

Aimee Meredith Cox is a new associate professor of African American studies and an associate professor of anthropology at Yale University and Sami Schalk is a new assistant professor of gender and women’s studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.