MIT Is the Latest University to Explore Its Ties to Slavery

MIT Is the Latest University to Explore Its Ties to Slavery

Slavery was outlawed in Massachusetts in the late 1780s. However, researchers discovered that MIT’s first president – William Barton Rogers – owned slaves while he lived in Virginia.

In Memoriam: Lerone Bennett Jr., 1928-2018

In Memoriam: Lerone Bennett Jr., 1928-2018

Lerone Bennett, Jr. was a highly respected historian of the African American experience. He served as an editor at Ebony magazine for more than a half century and taught at Northwestern University.

University of Tennessee Students Creating Digital Archive of Records of Black Civil War Troops

University of Tennessee Students Creating Digital Archive of Records of Black Civil War Troops

More than 180,000 Black troops served in the Union Army during the Civil War and 1,100 were members of the 1st U.S. Colored Troops (Heavy Artillery) that was formed in Knoxville in 1864 More than three fourths of the Black troops in Knoxville were former slaves.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Harvard University Acquires the Papers of Angela Davis

Harvard University Acquires the Papers of Angela Davis

Professor Davis, who taught at the University of California, Santa Cruz until 2008, has been a political activist for most of her life, advocating for the rights of African Americans, women, and prison inmates.

Princeton University's Plan to Deal With the Legacy of Woodrow Wilson

Princeton University’s Plan to Deal With the Legacy of Woodrow Wilson

At Princeton, Woodrow Wilson had refused to consider the admission of Black students. As President of the United States, he racially segregated the federal government workforce and appointed White supremacists to his cabinet.

Trudier Harris Wins Nonfiction Writing Award From the University of Alabama

Trudier Harris Wins Nonfiction Writing Award From the University of Alabama

Trudier Harris, University Distinguished Research Professor of English at the University of Alabama, received the Clarence C. Cason Award in Nonfiction Writing from the journalism department at the university for her body of work on women and Black southern writers.

Two Black Male Scholars Appointed to New Faculty Positions

Two Black Male Scholars Appointed to New Faculty Positions

Squire J. Booker was named to the Eberly Distinguished Chair in Science at Pennsylvania State University and Damascus Kafumbe was promoted to associate professor of music at Middlebury College in Vermont.

On Foreign Language AP Tests, the Racial Scoring Gap Is Small

On Foreign Language AP Tests, the Racial Scoring Gap Is Small

For all Advanced Placement tests combined in 2017, the average score for Blacks was 2.03, compared to the average White score of 3.02. But Black students do better in relationship to Whites on some AP tests, particular foreign language tests.

Juliette Bell to Step Down From Presidency of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Juliette Bell to Step Down From Presidency of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Dr. Bell became president of the university in July 1, 2012. From 2009 to 2012, Dr. Bell was provost and vice president for academic affairs at Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio. In retirement, she plans to write a book on her journey from the cotton fields of Alabama to the presidency of a state university.

John L. Jackson Appointed Dean of School of Communication at the University of Pennsylvania

John L. Jackson Appointed Dean of School of Communication at the University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Jackson currently serves as the Richard Perry University Professor and dean of the School of Social Policy and Practice at the University of Pennsylvania. He has held that post since 2014. Professor Jackson joined the faculty at the university in 2006.

Academic Study Finds That Hip-Hop Music Encourages Black Youth to Try Ecstasy

Academic Study Finds That Hip-Hop Music Encourages Black Youth to Try Ecstasy

The study notes that lyrics in popular Hip-Hop music glorify the use of the drug. The authors interviewed a group of ecstasy users and found that 82 percent said that Hip-Hop music had influenced their decision to use the drug.

MIT Scholar Finds Racial Bias in Commercial Facial Analysis Programs

MIT Scholar Finds Racial Bias in Commercial Facial Analysis Programs

The study found that commercially available face analysis programs had a very low error rate when determining the gender of light-skinned men. For women who had the darkest skin, the systems failed to accurately determine their gender nearly half the time.

Clark Atlanta University Appoints a Dean for Its School of Business Administration

Clark Atlanta University Appoints a Dean for Its School of Business Administration

Silvanus J. Udoka currently serves as a professor and chair of the department of management at North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro. He holds a joint appointment in the department of industrial and systems engineering.

Three African American Men Honored With Prestigious Awards

Three African American Men Honored With Prestigious Awards

The honorees are Ernest E. Jeffries, associate dean of students at Davidson College, Robert Smith, a graduate of Tougaloo College who was a major figure in the civil rights movement, and Roscoe Mitchell of Mills College.

New Virginia Union University President Is Sued by His Former Employer

New Virginia Union University President Is Sued by His Former Employer

Hakim Lucas, the new president of Virginia Union University, is being accused by his former employer of taking a bribe to rig a contract for a private developer to build two 600-student dormitories at Bethune-Cookman University.

Loan Forgiveness for Four HBCUs Devastated by Hurricane Katrina

Loan Forgiveness for Four HBCUs Devastated by Hurricane Katrina

The recent budget deal that ended the brief government shutdown included an important provision for four historically Black colleges and universities that suffered considerable damage from Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

North Carolina Central Joins the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

North Carolina Central Joins the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

North Carolina Central University is the first historically Black college or university to be a member of a U.S. Department of Energy Center of Excellence.

Texas Southern University Earns the First National HBCU Debate Championship

Texas Southern University Earns the First National HBCU Debate Championship

This past October, Wiley College in Marshall, Texas was awarded a grant from the Charles Koch Foundation to establish a Historically Black Colleges and Universities Speech and Debate League. The Team from Texas Southern University is the first champion.

In Memoriam: Grace Victoria Edmondson Harris, 1933-2018

In Memoriam: Grace Victoria Edmondson Harris, 1933-2018

Dr. Harris was the first African American women to serve as a chief academic officer at a four-year public university in Virginia. She served on the faculty at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond for 48 years.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

University of Virginia to Form a Commission to Examine Its Role in Racial Segregation

University of Virginia to Form a Commission to Examine Its Role in Racial Segregation

In 2013, the University of Virginia formed a commission that investigated the university’s historical relationship with slavery. Now the university has announced the formation of the President’s Commission on the University in the Age of Segregation.

In Memoriam: Saul T. Wilson Jr., 1928-2018

In Memoriam: Saul T. Wilson Jr., 1928-2018

Saul T. Wilson, Jr. was a member of the first pre-veterinary medicine class at what was then the Tuskegee Institute. He was a member of the second class of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Tuskegee and later served on the faculty.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

New Historical Marker Honors First Black Student to Apply to the University of Southern Mississippi

New Historical Marker Honors First Black Student to Apply to the University of Southern Mississippi

Clyde Kennard applied for admission to what was then Mississippi Southern College in 1955 and was denied. In 1959, he applied again and was rejected. For challenging the rules of Jim Crow, he was framed and sentenced to seven years in state prison.

Berkeley's First Tenured Black Scholar Has a Building Named in His Honor

Berkeley’s First Tenured Black Scholar Has a Building Named in His Honor

Dr. David Blackwell, an accomplished statistician, joined the mathematics department at Berkeley in 1954 and stayed on the faculty there until retiring in 1988. In 1965, he was the first African American to be inducted into the National Academy of Sciences.

In Memoriam: Leon Ndugu Chancler, 1952-2018

In Memoriam: Leon Ndugu Chancler, 1952-2018

Leon Chancler was an accomplished drummer who worked with some of the biggest names in the music business and taught for 23 years in the jazz and popular music programs at Thornton School of Music at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

Two African American University Administrators Announce Their Retirements

Two African American University Administrators Announce Their Retirements

Gaddis Faulcon recently retired from his post as vice president at Saint Augustine’s University in Raleigh, North Carolina and Phail Wynn, a vice president at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, announced he will retire in June.

New Research Verifies Glass Was Manufactured in Africa Before the Arrival of Europeans

New Research Verifies Glass Was Manufactured in Africa Before the Arrival of Europeans

Abidemi Babatunde Babalola, a visiting fellow at Harvard University with a Ph.D. in anthropology from Rice University in Houston, finds that that glass was being produced in sub-Saharan Africa as early as the 11th century, well before the arrival of Europeans.

Poet Elizabeth Alexander Named President of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Poet Elizabeth Alexander Named President of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Elizabeth Alexander, a professor at Columbia University who was selected to write a poem and read it at President Obama’s first inauguration in 2009, has been appointed president of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in New York.

Study by Ohio State University Economists Shows Black Politicians Matter

Study by Ohio State University Economists Shows Black Politicians Matter

A new National Bureau of Economic Research working paper by Trevon Logan, a professor of economics at Ohio State University, finds that when Blacks hold political power their economic status rises. But when they lose political power, their economic fortunes dwindle.

Morgan State University Extends President's Contract for Five Years

Morgan State University Extends President’s Contract for Five Years

Dr. Wilson became president of Morgan State in July 2010. In December 2012, the board of regents of Morgan State University voted not to renew his contract. After protests, he was kept on with a series of one-year deals. Now, he will be president until at least 2023.

Confronting the Problem of Teachers' Low Expectations for Black Students

Confronting the Problem of Teachers’ Low Expectations for Black Students

The results showed that mathematics teachers had lower expectations for children from underrepresented groups and for White girls. And the students who were not expected to do well by their teachers did not fare well academically.

The Next Provost at Iona College in New Rochelle, New York

The Next Provost at Iona College in New Rochelle, New York

Dr. Darrell P. Wheeler has been serving as professor and dean of the School of Social Welfare and vice provost for public engagement at the University at Albany of the State University of New York. He will begin his new job at Iona College on July 1.

New Faculty Roles for Three African American Scholars

New Faculty Roles for Three African American Scholars

Taking on new faculty roles are Christal N. Brown at Middlebury College in Vermont, Brenda Lee at the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York, and Neil Roberts at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts.