Archive for June, 2020

Report Finds That Texas Southern University Admitted Thousands of Unqualified Students

Report Finds That Texas Southern University Admitted Thousands of Unqualified Students

An independent report from the Berkeley Group, commissioned by the board of regents of Texas Southern University, found that the university admitted large numbers of students and doled out about $2 million in scholarships to students who did not meet the admissions requirements of the university.

Rion Amilcar Scott Wins the Towson University Prize for Literature

Rion Amilcar Scott Wins the Towson University Prize for Literature

The Towson University Prize for Literature is awarded annually for a single book or book-length manuscript of fiction, poetry, drama, or imaginative nonfiction. Scott teaches creative writing at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Tuskegee University in Alabama Renews Focus on Career Development

Tuskegee University in Alabama Renews Focus on Career Development

The university in Alabama is now offering an intensive training program that will certify faculty members as Certified Career Services Providers. The credential prepares faculty and staff to better mentor students as they guide them in connecting academic and co-curricular opportunities with their professional goals.

New University Administrative Posts for Six African Americans

New University Administrative Posts for Six African Americans

Taking on new administrative roles are Tracey Ford at the North Carolina School of the Arts, Sean T. Bennett at Salem State University, Samara Hough at the University of Michigan-Flint, Martin Jarmond at UCLA, Claudia Donald at the University of Massachusetts, and Jasmon Sessoms at Fayetteville State University.

In Memoriam: Conrad Worrill, 1941-2020

In Memoriam: Conrad Worrill, 1941-2020

Dr. Worrill joined the faculty of the department of inner city studies at Northeastern Illinois University in 1976. He also served as the director of the university’s Jacob H. Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies. He retired in 2016 after serving on the faculty for 50 year.

RIP George Floyd

RIP George Floyd

Rest In Power … click through to #BLM

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

The First Black Woman to Serve as Student Body President at MIT

The First Black Woman to Serve as Student Body President at MIT

Danielle Geathers who is completing her sophomore year in mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was elected president of the student body. Geathers is from Miami, Florida.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

American University Creates the Department of Critical Race, Gender, and Cultural Studies

American University Creates the Department of Critical Race, Gender, and Cultural Studies

The new department at American University in Washington, D.C., will focus on six areas of study: African and African American diaspora studies, American studies, Arab world studies, Asian studies, Latinx studies, and women, gender, and sexuality studies.

Austin Lane Selected as the Next Chancellor of Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Austin Lane Selected as the Next Chancellor of Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Dr. Lane served as president of Texas Southern University in Houston from 2016 to February of this year. When he takes on his new duties on July 6, he will be the first African American chancellor in the 150-year history of the Carbondale campus.

New Report Documents Decreasing College Opportunities for Low-Income Americans

New Report Documents Decreasing College Opportunities for Low-Income Americans

A new report from the Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education and the University of Pennsylvania’s Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy, shows how the pandemic will adversely affect the higher education opportunities of Americans from low-income families.

Cynthia Jackson-Hammond to Lead the Council for Higher Education Accreditation

Cynthia Jackson-Hammond to Lead the Council for Higher Education Accreditation

Dr. Jackson-Hammond is retiring as president of Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio, on June 30. She became the historically Black university’s first woman president on July 1, 2012. Earlier in her career, she was provost and vice president of academic affairs at Coppin State University in Baltimore.

Do College Graduates Think Their Alma Maters Adequately Investigate Discrimination?

Do College Graduates Think Their Alma Maters Adequately Investigate Discrimination?

A new poll conducted by the Gallup organization found that only 19 percent of African American college graduates strongly agreed with the statement: “If I had raised an issue about discrimination on campus, I am confident my college or university would have fully investigated it.”

Black Man to Become Dean of the Nation's Oldest Law School

Black Man to Become Dean of the Nation’s Oldest Law School

A. Benjamin Spencer will be the next dean of the William and Mary Law School in Williamsburg, Virginia. When he takes office on July 1, Professor Spencer will be William & Mary’s first African-American dean. Since 2014 he has been on the law school faculty at the University of Virginia.

New Survey Finds Racial Differences in Outlooks as a Result of the Pandemic

New Survey Finds Racial Differences in Outlooks as a Result of the Pandemic

A new survey by Civis Analytics, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation finds that 43 percent of White parents of high school students report that their children’s plans for higher education have changed due to the pandemic, compared to 59 percent of Black parents.

Governors State University in Illinois Appoints Cheryl Green as Its Sixth President

Governors State University in Illinois Appoints Cheryl Green as Its Sixth President

Last year, Dr. Green was appointed interim chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. At that time she was vice chancellor of student affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh. Earlier, Dr. Green served as assistant vice president of student affairs at Tennessee State University.