Archive for October, 2019

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Florida Gulf Coast University Names Its Library After Its Former President Wilson Bradshaw

Florida Gulf Coast University Names Its Library After Its Former President Wilson Bradshaw

Dr. Bradshaw served as the university’s president from 2007 to 2017. During his decade in office, enrollment increased by 60 percent to nearly 15,000 and the number of degrees granted annually doubled.

Georgia State Program Seeks to Boost Number of Black Male Teachers in STEM Fields

Georgia State Program Seeks to Boost Number of Black Male Teachers in STEM Fields

The U.S. Department of Education estimates that just 2 percent of teachers are Black men. A new initiative at Georgia State University is seeking to encourage more Black men to become teachers in STEM disciplines.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

In Memoriam: James A. Donaldson, 1941-2019

In Memoriam: James A. Donaldson, 1941-2019

Dr. Donaldson joined the faculty at Howard University in 1971. He chaired the Howard University mathematics department from 1972 to 1990. In this position, he developed the first doctoral program in mathematics at a historically Black university.

Washington State Ballot Referendum Could Reinstate Affirmative Action in College Admissions

Washington State Ballot Referendum Could Reinstate Affirmative Action in College Admissions

In 1998, voters in Washington State voted by a large margin to prohibit public colleges and universities from considering race in admissions decisions. This year, voters will have the opportunity to reinstate affirmative action.

North Carolina A&T State University Names Its College of Business and Economics

North Carolina A&T State University Names Its College of Business and Economics

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in Greensboro has announced that will name its College of Business and Economics after Willie A. Deese. This is the first time that a person has been used in a college’s name at the university.

Cheryl Evans Jones Named the 17th President of Paine College in Augusta, Georgia

Cheryl Evans Jones Named the 17th President of Paine College in Augusta, Georgia

Dr. Jones first joined the Paine College faculty in 1993 as an assistant professor of psychology. In 2014, she served as Paine’s acting provost and vice president for academic affairs. Dr. Jones has been serving as acting president of Paine College since July.

Study Finds That HBCUs Get Shortchanged in Traditional College Rankings

Study Finds That HBCUs Get Shortchanged in Traditional College Rankings

A new study led by Precious M. Hardy, a doctoral student in educational psychology at the University of Missouri, find that HBCUs do quite well in comparison to predominantly White colleges in the performance of their students when socioeconomic factors of the students are the same.

Robert Winn Named Director of the Massey Cancer Center at Virginia Commonwealth University

Robert Winn Named Director of the Massey Cancer Center at Virginia Commonwealth University

Dr. Winn has been serving as the director of the University of Illinois Cancer Center in Chicago and as associate vice chancellor of health affairs for community-based practice at the University of Illinois Hospital and Health Science System.

Targeted Educational Programs Can Improve Educational Outcomes for Black Males

Targeted Educational Programs Can Improve Educational Outcomes for Black Males

A new working paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research finds that targeted educational programs geared toward young Black males can have a significant positive impact on lowering their high school dropout rates and raising their high school graduation rates.

The Next Dean of the College of Business at Bowie State University in Maryland

The Next Dean of the College of Business at Bowie State University in Maryland

Dr. McNeil has been serving as an associate professor of economics at Prairie View A&M University in Texas. There, he led the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program he co-founded in the College of Business.

New Analysis Looks at Admission Rates by Race at Virginia's Public Universities

New Analysis Looks at Admission Rates by Race at Virginia’s Public Universities

According to the report, when comparing applicants to the University of Virginia who had similar test scores on college entrance examinations and high school grade point averages, 74 percent of Black applicants were admitted compared to only 30 percent of White applicants.

Philander Smith College Offers a New Pipeline Program to Law School

Philander Smith College Offers a New Pipeline Program to Law School

The program provides guaranteed acceptance to the Bowen School of Law at the University of Arkansas Little Rock for Philander Smith College graduates who have a 3.4 grade point average in college and score at least 154 on the Law School Admission Test.

A Trio of Black Scholars Who Are Taking on New Assignments

A Trio of Black Scholars Who Are Taking on New Assignments

Bunmi Olatunji was named associate dean of academic affairs at the Graduate School of Vanderbilt University. Monica Lynn Miles has been named associate director of the University at Buffalo’s Great Lakes Program and Pamela Johnson Rowsey was appointed to a named professorship at UNC-Greensboro.

Retired NFL Player Establishes a Scholarship Fund Honoring His Mother at Tuskegee University

Retired NFL Player Establishes a Scholarship Fund Honoring His Mother at Tuskegee University

NFL pro football veteran Michael Johnson, who played for the Cincinnati Bengals and Tampa Bay Buccaneers, has made forging new educational and economic opportunities for others in and around his native Selma, Alabama, his new full-time job.

Framingham State University to Honor its First Black Graduate: Mary Miles Bibb

Framingham State University to Honor its First Black Graduate: Mary Miles Bibb

After graduating in 1843, Bibb went on to become one of the first African American woman teachers on the continent. She opened several schools for Black children during a 23-year teaching career in Canada. The university will rename a residence hall in her honor.

Two HBCUs in Ohio Team Up With the U.S. Small Business Administration

Two HBCUs in Ohio Team Up With the U.S. Small Business Administration

Wilberforce University and Central State University, historically Black educational institutions in Ohio, will partner with the U.S. Small Business Administration to increase opportunities for students in the state’s entrepreneurial ecosystem.

Four African Americans Appointed to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Four African Americans Appointed to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Taking on new roles are Belinda Higgs Hyppolite at the University of Oklahoma, Phillip Howard at Tuskegee University in Alabama, D’Andra Mull at the University of Florida, and Jasher Cox at Lincoln Memorial University in Harrogate, Tennessee.

Two White Students Arrested for Yelling Racial Slurs at the University of Connecticut

Two White Students Arrested for Yelling Racial Slurs at the University of Connecticut

The White male students were charged with ridicule on account of creed, religion, color, denomination, nationality or race. They were released pending a court date.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Toilet Paper Noose Hung on Dormitory Door at Michigan State

Toilet Paper Noose Hung on Dormitory Door at Michigan State

The university reported the incident to campus police and after investigating the incident, decided that it was a “Halloween prank” and was not intended to “offend anyone or denote any racial bias.”

Rice University in Houston Debuts its Center for African and African American Studies

Rice University in Houston Debuts its Center for African and African American Studies

Anthony Pinn, the Agnes Cullen Arnold Professor of Humanities and professor of religion, will serve as the center’s founding director.

Michelle Knight-Manuel is Named Executive Editor of the Teachers College Record

Michelle Knight-Manuel is Named Executive Editor of the Teachers College Record

Professor Knight-Manuel is the thirteenth scholar to serve as editor in the journal’s 119-year history. Dr. Knight-Manuel’s research focuses on college readiness and access, immigrant youth’s civic strengths, and culturally relevant teacher preparation and professional development.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Princeton Theological Seminary Approves Measures to Address Its Ties to Slavery

Princeton Theological Seminary Approves Measures to Address Its Ties to Slavery

Princeton Theological Seminary in New Jersey benefited from the slave economy, both through investments in Southern banks in the mid-19th century and from donors who profited from slavery. It is now taking several steps to repent for its past history.

University of North Florida Students Restore Photographic History of Lincolnville

University of North Florida Students Restore Photographic History of Lincolnville

The Lincolnville Museum and Cultural Center in St. Augustine, Florida, is showcasing a new exhibit of the photographs of Richard Twine, showing life in the city’s African-American neighborhood of Lincolnville about a century ago.

Charles R. Drew University's New Psychiatry Residency Program Addresses Mental Health in LA

Charles R. Drew University’s New Psychiatry Residency Program Addresses Mental Health in LA

Historically Black Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science and the County of Los Angeles Department of Health Services have joined forces to deliver effective culturally-appropriate mental health treatment in South Los Angeles.

New Book Examines the History of African Americans at the College of William & Mary

New Book Examines the History of African Americans at the College of William & Mary

The book explores the gradual advancement of Black people at the university along with information about the first undergraduate African-American students in residence, who arrived in 1967. Author Jacquelyn McLendon also tracks the history of African Americans among the faculty and administration.

Georgetown University Study Finds the Deck Is Stacked Against Black Workers

Georgetown University Study Finds the Deck Is Stacked Against Black Workers

New research from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce finds that White workers have benefited from historical and systemic educational and economic advantages to build a disproportionate edge in the educational pipeline and the workforce that will continue to last for decades.

Four African American Academics In This Year's Class of MacArthur Fellows

Four African American Academics In This Year’s Class of MacArthur Fellows

The Chicago-based MacArthur Foundation has announced the selection of 26 individuals in this year’s class of MacArthur Fellows. This year, five of the 26 MacArthur Fellows are Black. Four have current ties to academia.

Racial Differences in Children's Perception of the Intelligence of Men and Women

Racial Differences in Children’s Perception of the Intelligence of Men and Women

A new study conducted by New York University finds that children of all races are more likely to think of White men as ” brilliant” compared to White women. But the study found that children of all races do not extend this stereotype to African American men and women.

David A. Brennen Appointed President-Elect of the Southeast Association of Law Schools

David A. Brennen Appointed President-Elect of the Southeast Association of Law Schools

David A. Brennen is dean of the University of Kentucky College of Law. Professor Brennen joined the faculty at the University of Kentucky in 2009 from the University of Georgia School of Law where he was a professor since 2006.

School Choice in the United States by Racial and Ethnic Groups

School Choice in the United States by Racial and Ethnic Groups

In 2016, 3.3 percent of all students ages 5 to 17 were homeschooled. For African Americans, 1.9 percent of all students ages 5 to 17 were homeschooled. African Americans made up 15.3 percent of all students in the nation’s public schools. But Blacks were 26.5 percent of all students enrolled in public charter schools.