Archive for August, 2019

Student-Operated Physical Therapy/Occupational Therapy Clinic Opens at Tennesee State

Student-Operated Physical Therapy/Occupational Therapy Clinic Opens at Tennesee State

There are now 38 student-run physical therapy clinics at colleges and universities nationwide. But the clinic at Tennessee State University in Nashville is the first such clinic at a historically Black college or university.

Three African American Scholars Who Have Been Assigned New Roles

Three African American Scholars Who Have Been Assigned New Roles

Taking on new assignments are Michael Strickland of Boise State University in Idaho, Narketta Sparkman-Key at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, and Frederick A. Williams Jr. at Kentucky State University.

Morgan State University to Build a New Student Housing Facility to Address Growing Student Body

Morgan State University to Build a New Student Housing Facility to Address Growing Student Body

The new student housing facility will add between 700 and 900 beds to accommodate the university’s growing student body. It will be located on Morgan’s South Campus, adjacent to the site of the Thurgood Marshall Apartment Complex.

Sandra Barnes Wins the  the Cox-Johnson-Frazier Award From the American Sociological Association

Sandra Barnes Wins the the Cox-Johnson-Frazier Award From the American Sociological Association

Awarded since 1971, the Cox-Johnson-Frazier Award is one of the annual honors given by the ASA to an individual for their work in the intellectual traditions of Oliver Cox, Charles S. Johnson and E. Franklin Frazier, three African American scholars.

HBCU Partners With a State University to Educate Future Teachers About Social Justice

HBCU Partners With a State University to Educate Future Teachers About Social Justice

The department of education at Winston-Salem State University has partnered with the Reich College of Education at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina, to help future teachers develop social justice dispositions while exploring school and community diversity.

Nine African Americans Who Have Been Appointed to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Nine African Americans Who Have Been Appointed to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Here is this week’s roundup of African Americans who have been appointed to new administrative positions at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

College of Charleston Preparing Documentary Film Series on Its Ties to Slavery

College of Charleston Preparing Documentary Film Series on Its Ties to Slavery

Now, like many of its peer institutions that had ties to the institution of slavery, the College of Charleston in South Carolina has begun to more fully examine its history. A documentary film with the title If These Walls Could Talk, is in production and is scheduled for release in the spring.

In Memoriam Wilbert Greenfield, 1933-2019

In Memoriam Wilbert Greenfield, 1933-2019

Dr. Wilbert Greenfield became the tenth president of Johnson C. Smith University in 1973 and served in that role until 1982. In 1984, the University’s board of trustees named a dormitory Wilbert Greenfield Hall in his honor.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Delaware State University Partners With Two Asian Institutions of Higher Education

Delaware State University Partners With Two Asian Institutions of Higher Education

Historically Black Delaware State University in Dover has partnered with Mokpo National University of South Korea and Changchun University of Science and Technology in China to establish study abroad opportunities for students at both institutions.

University of Memphis Launches The African American Male Academy

University of Memphis Launches The African American Male Academy

Starting in middle school, the initiative will identify, recruit, and induct African American male students into a culture of inclusive excellence. These students will be set on a path toward college completion.

In Memoriam: Gwendolyn Lytle

In Memoriam: Gwendolyn Lytle

Gwendolyn Lytle was a member of the music department faculty at Pomona College in Claremont, California, for 35 years. Earlier, she taught at the University of California, Riverside.

The New Leader of the College of Education at Tennessee State University

The New Leader of the College of Education at Tennessee State University

Tennessee State University in Nashville has named Jerri A. Haynes as the new dean of the College of Education. Dr. Haynes was an associate professor and assistant dean of the College of Education at Fort Hays State University in Kansas.

U.S. Department of Education Releases New Data on Racial Differences in Financial Aid

U.S. Department of Education Releases New Data on Racial Differences in Financial Aid

Whites were significantly more likely than Blacks to receive merit-based financial aid from their colleges or universities. Some 14.2 percent of Whites received merit-based financial aid from their colleges or universities compared to 8 percent of Blacks.

LaTonia Collins Smith Serving as Provost at Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis

LaTonia Collins Smith Serving as Provost at Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis

Dr. Collins Smith began her career in higher education at Harris-Stowe State University in 2010 as an academic counselor. She has served as executive director of the Center for Career Engagement and since 2016 she has been assistant provost.

New Study Shows Declining Racial Gaps in Criminal Sentencing Since the 1990s

New Study Shows Declining Racial Gaps in Criminal Sentencing Since the 1990s

In 1992, Black Americans were sentenced to roughly 27 more months in prison than White Americans, increasing to a difference of 42 months in 1996. In 2016, the gap was only eight months, an 80 percent reduction from 20 years earlier.

Two African American Women Appointed to Dean Positions

Two African American Women Appointed to Dean Positions

Taja-Nia Henderson has been named dean of the Graduate School at Rutgers University in New Jersey and Jeannine Dingus-Eason was named dean of education at Rhode Island College.

Research Documents a Significant Lack of Racial Diversity in Cancer Clinical Trials

Research Documents a Significant Lack of Racial Diversity in Cancer Clinical Trials

“Our findings show that the science might not be applicable to the population that’s going to receive the medications,” said the study’s lead author, Dr. Jonathan Loree.

North Carolina Central University Partnership to Boost Drug Discovery Research

North Carolina Central University Partnership to Boost Drug Discovery Research

The partnership will allow for collaboration between North Carolina State’s Comparative Medicine Institute and NCCU’s Biomanufacturing Research Institute and Technology Enterprise, which contains a library of over 200,000 chemical compounds and high-throughput screening equipment.

Five African American Scholars Who Are Taking on New Assignments

Five African American Scholars Who Are Taking on New Assignments

The five faculty members taking on new duties are Olga Davis at Arizona State University, Monique L. Akassi at Talladega College in Alabama, Rodney Priestly at Princeton University in New Jersey, Phillip L. Pointer at Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Arkansas, and Edwin Thomas at Grambling State University in Louisiana.

Claflin University's Pathway Program for Nursing Students Pursuing a Bachelor's Degree

Claflin University’s Pathway Program for Nursing Students Pursuing a Bachelor’s Degree

Historically Black Claflin University in Orangeburg, South Carolina, has partnered with the South Carolina Technical College System to create a pathway for registered nurses (RNs) who have earned an associate’s degree from one of the 16 schools in the SCTC System to transfer to Claflin University’s RN to Bachelor of Science in Nursing program.

National Communication Association to Honor Louisiana State University's Tina M. Harris

National Communication Association to Honor Louisiana State University’s Tina M. Harris

Tina M. Harris of the Manship School of Mass Communication at Louisiana State University is being honored for “dedication to excellence, commitment to the profession, concern for others, vision of what could be, and acceptance of diversity and forthrightness.”

Xavier University Creates Pre-Pharmacy Pathway Program for High School Students

Xavier University Creates Pre-Pharmacy Pathway Program for High School Students

Upon completion of the program, students will earn a Certificate of Pre-Pharmacy Studies, a Gold Seal on their high school diploma, and preferred admission to the Xavier College of Pharmacy

New Administrative Positions for 10 African Americans at Colleges and Universities

New Administrative Positions for 10 African Americans at Colleges and Universities

Here is this week’s roundup of African Americans who have been appointed to new administrative positions at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

NBA Star Stephen Curry Funds the Reestablishment of Golf Teams at Howard University

NBA Star Stephen Curry Funds the Reestablishment of Golf Teams at Howard University

Starting in the 2020-21 academic year, Howard will field men’s and women’s golf teams. Curry’s donation will provide the startup costs for the program and fund it for six years.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

UMass' World Librarians Project Brings Educational Resources to African Countries

UMass’ World Librarians Project Brings Educational Resources to African Countries

The University of Massachusetts at Amherst World Librarians Project works with 20 schools and libraries in Malawi, providing them with portable servers and WiFi hotspot devices loaded with open-access educational resources that can be used by students and teachers in solar-powered computer labs.

In Memoriam: McDonald Williams, 1917-2019

In Memoriam: McDonald Williams, 1917-2019

Dr. Williams served as director of the Honors Program at Tennessee State University for 23 years before his retirement in 1988. He also spent 30 years at the university serving as a professor of English.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

CUNY Announces New Policies Aimed at Increasing Engagement with Minority-Owned Businesses

CUNY Announces New Policies Aimed at Increasing Engagement with Minority-Owned Businesses

A recent conference offered insight to minority- and women-owned businesses and service-disabled veteran-owned businesses on how to conduct business with CUNY and to provide a forum for networking with CUNY decision-makers.

In Memoriam: Paule Marshall, 1929-2019

In Memoriam: Paule Marshall, 1929-2019

Paule Marshall taught at both Virginia Commonwealth University and New York University. She authored numerous novels, essays, and works of short fiction.

University of Chicago Creates an Interactive Map Detailing the 1919 Chicago Race Riots

University of Chicago Creates an Interactive Map Detailing the 1919 Chicago Race Riots

The new map highlights how Chicago’s Black residents were at risk of being victimized across much wider swaths of city than previously known.

New Report Documents the Rise of Racial Hate on College and University Campuses

New Report Documents the Rise of Racial Hate on College and University Campuses

The report document that in 2016, more than 1,000 hate crimes were committed on college campuses across the country. Furthermore, the report finds that between 2011 and 2016, there was a 40 percent increase in campus hate crimes.