Archive for July, 2019

Noose Found Hanging From a Tree on Stanford University Campus

Noose Found Hanging From a Tree on Stanford University Campus

A noose was found hanging from a tree in front of a student residence on the Stanford University campus. The residence hall was housing high school students who were attending a camp on campus.

University of Michigan Creates New Professorships to Honor Diversity Efforts

University of Michigan Creates New Professorships to Honor Diversity Efforts

The new professorships will recognize senior faculty who have shown a commitment to the university’s ideals of diversity, equity, and inclusion through their scholarship, teaching, or service and engagement.

Harvard Law School Students Receive Racist Messages

Harvard Law School Students Receive Racist Messages

The messages included “we all hate u”, “you know you don’t belong here” and “you’re just here because of affirmative action.”

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

White Professor Sues Tuskegee University for Age and Race Discrimination

White Professor Sues Tuskegee University for Age and Race Discrimination

Marshall Burns joined the faculty at the university in 1976, was promoted to associate professor in 1978, and to full professor in 1980. Yet, according to the lawsuit, his annual salary of $60,500, is akin to what an associate professor at the university would receive.

No Progress in the Number of Black Students Admitted to the University of California

No Progress in the Number of Black Students Admitted to the University of California

Three years ago, there was a major increase in the number of Black students admitted to the nine undergraduate campuses of the University of California. Since that time progress has stagnated.

In Memoriam: David L. Ferguson, 1949-2019

In Memoriam: David L. Ferguson, 1949-2019

David L. Ferguson was department chair and Distinguished Service Professor of Technology and Society at Stony Brook University in New York. He had taught at the university since 1981.

Three Ole Miss Students Suspended From Fraternity for Offensive Photograph

Three Ole Miss Students Suspended From Fraternity for Offensive Photograph

The photograph showed the three students armed with guns and smiling in front of a historical marker designating where the body of Emmett Till was found in 1955. The sign was riddled with bullet holes.

How the Student Loan Debt Crisis Impacts Racial Diversity in the Teacher Workforce

How the Student Loan Debt Crisis Impacts Racial Diversity in the Teacher Workforce

The statistics show that 91 percent of the Blacks who completed teacher training programs accumulated student debt, compared to 76 percent of their White counterparts. And the median undergraduate debt load of Black teachers is about double the median debt load of White teachers.

A. Eugene Washington Gets a Vote of Confidence at Duke University

A. Eugene Washington Gets a Vote of Confidence at Duke University

A. Eugene Washington, chancellor for health affairs and president and CEO of the Duke University Health System, has been reappointed to a second five-year term beginning July 1, 2020. He came to Duke in 2015 after serving as dean of the medical school at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Study Sheds New Light on Racial Disparity in Special Education Assignments

Study Sheds New Light on Racial Disparity in Special Education Assignments

A new study from the National Bureau of Economic Research and led by an economist at Michigan State University finds that special education assignment rates aren’t necessarily about a student’s race – but rather about how that student’s race compares to the school’s racial makeup.

Two African American Men Appointed to Positions as Deans

Two African American Men Appointed to Positions as Deans

Donald Easton-Brooks is the new dean of the College of Education at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Richard C. Miller is now serving as interim dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at Benedict College in Columbia, South Carolina.

Racial Disparities in School Discipline Have Little to Do With Different Student Behavior

Racial Disparities in School Discipline Have Little to Do With Different Student Behavior

A new study from scholars at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, and Princeton University in New Jersey, not only examined racial differences in discipline rates at schools but goes farther to examine the reasons for the racial disparity.

Bobbi Knight Chosen to Lead Miles College in Fairfield, Alabama

Bobbi Knight Chosen to Lead Miles College in Fairfield, Alabama

Knight has served on the college’s board of trustees and is the former vice president of the Birmingham division of Alabama Power. She has been serving as chair of the Birmingham Airport Authority. She will begin her duties as interim president on September 1.

Florida A&M University Establishes 2+2 Pathway Program With Hillsborough Community College

Florida A&M University Establishes 2+2 Pathway Program With Hillsborough Community College

Students participating in the pathway program will spend two years at Hillsborough Community College. When they complete their associate’s degree, they can transfer to FAMU to complete a bachelor’s degree program.

Four Black Scholars Appointed to New Posts in Academia

Four Black Scholars Appointed to New Posts in Academia

Taking on new assignments are Gbemende Johnson at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York, Dwight Radcliff Jr. at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California, Raymond E. Samuel at North Carolina A&T State University, and Martha Dawson of the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

University of Maryland Eastern Shore Now Offering Two Certificates in Special Education

University of Maryland Eastern Shore Now Offering Two Certificates in Special Education

The University of Maryland Eastern Shore in Princess Anne has announced that it will now offer two certificate programs in special education; one for upperclassman pursuing bachelor’s degrees and another for graduate-level students.

Spelman College President Mary Schmidt Campbell Wins 2018 Hooks National Book Award

Spelman College President Mary Schmidt Campbell Wins 2018 Hooks National Book Award

Mary Schmidt Campbell’s An American Odyssey is a telling biography of the artist Romare Bearden, whose iconic collages conveyed the richness and complexity of African American life in the civil rights era.

Three Alabama HBCUs Participating in Industrial Hemp Research Project

Three Alabama HBCUs Participating in Industrial Hemp Research Project

Historically Black Tuskegee University, Alabama State University, and Alabama A&M University will participate in a research project o grow and study industrial hemp, a non-intoxicating cannabinoid.

Nine African Americans Who Were Appointed to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Nine African Americans Who Were Appointed to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Here is this week’s roundup of African Americans who have been appointed to new administrative positions at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

New UCLA Online Video Archive Devoted to Former Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley

New UCLA Online Video Archive Devoted to Former Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley

The archive contains footage from the library of KTLA-TV in Los Angeles. It includes unedited news segments, never-before-seen footage, and news stories not seen publicly since originally broadcast.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

New Boise State University President Pressured to End Diversity and Inclusion Programs

New Boise State University President Pressured to End Diversity and Inclusion Programs

A letter from 28 GOP members of the Idaho House of Representatives urged the new president of Boise State University to abandon at least some of the university’s diversity and inclusion programs. The letter said that such initiatives were “antithetical to the Idaho way.”

Three Black Academics Who Have Stepped Down From Their University Posts

Three Black Academics Who Have Stepped Down From Their University Posts

The three retirees are Hazel Carby at Yale University, Patricia White at Alcorn State University in Mississippi, and Ismail Abdullahi at North Carolina Central University.

Three African Americans Appointed to Positions as Deans

Three African Americans Appointed to Positions as Deans

Stevie Watson is the inaugural dean of the School of Agriculture, Business & Technology at SUNY-Morrisville. Yolanda Cooper has been promoted to dean and university librarian at Emory University in Atlanta and Joan R.M. Bullock is the new dean of the law school at Texas Southern University in Houston.

Andrea Jackson Is the New Dean of the Howard University College of Dentistry

Andrea Jackson Is the New Dean of the Howard University College of Dentistry

Dr. Jackson has served as interim dean of the College of Dentistry since July 2018. Earlier, she was associate dean of clinical affairs and professor and chair of the department of prosthodontics. She has served on the Howard University faculty for the past 30 years.

Racial Differences in College Persistence and Retention Rates

Racial Differences in College Persistence and Retention Rates

A new report from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center finds that college student persistence and retention rates are on the rise. But there remains significant differences in these rates between Blacks and Whites.

Peggy Valentine Appointed to Lead Fayetteville State University in North Carolina

Peggy Valentine Appointed to Lead Fayetteville State University in North Carolina

Dr. Valentine has been serving as dean of the School of Health Sciences at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina. Her research focuses on homeless and minority health issues. Dr. Valentine is the founding editor-in-chief for the Journal of Best Practices in Health Professions Diversity.

Does Rising Neighborhood Diversity Lead to a Drop in Social Capital?

Does Rising Neighborhood Diversity Lead to a Drop in Social Capital?

Some researchers suggest that social capital may decline because people retreat into their shells when faced with rising diversity — rejecting newcomers but also pulling back on engagement with people of their own ethnic group in an effort to shelter themselves.

Angela Peters Appointed Provost at Albany State University in Georgia

Angela Peters Appointed Provost at Albany State University in Georgia

Since 2013, Dr. Peters has been serving as vice provost for academic programs at Claflin University in Orangeburg, South Carolina. Additionally, she has served as a professor and chair for the department of chemistry at Claflin.

New Report Finds Residential Segregation Remains Rampant in the United States

New Report Finds Residential Segregation Remains Rampant in the United States

The Center for American Progress reports that significant disparities still exist between African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites in terms of access to homeownership. This, in turn, hinders the ability of African American families to send their children to quality public schools.

The New Leader of the International Association of Sickle Cell Nurses and Professional Associates

The New Leader of the International Association of Sickle Cell Nurses and Professional Associates

Dr. Clayton-Jones currently serves as an assistant professor in the College of Nursing at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She has also taught at the Medical College of Wisconsin, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Baylor University, Milwaukee Area Technical College, and Concordia University.

Emory University's Vanessa Siddle Walker to Receive the Lilliam Smith Book Award

Emory University’s Vanessa Siddle Walker to Receive the Lilliam Smith Book Award

Vanessa Siddle Walker is the Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of African American Educational Studies at Emory University in Atlanta. Professor Walker will be honored on September 1 at the DeKalb County Public Library.

A New Degree in Health Services Management at North Carolina A&T State University

A New Degree in Health Services Management at North Carolina A&T State University

The university hopes to enroll 150 full-time students in the health services management degree program next fall. The goal is to enroll more than 500 students in the program within four years.