Archive for April, 2019

Morehouse College to Consider Transgender Students for Admission

Morehouse College to Consider Transgender Students for Admission

Beginning with the class that will enter in the fall of 2020, Morehouse College in Atlanta will consider for admission any student who identifies as a man, regardless of the gender assigned to them at birth. The new policy also states that “all students are expected to self-identify as men throughout their education at Morehouse.”

Racist Video Showing Ohio University Students Circulated on Social Media

Racist Video Showing Ohio University Students Circulated on Social Media

A racist video showing students at Ohio University was found on a GroupMe chat and then was widely circulated on social media. The video show one student reciting a rhyme with a racial slur.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Texas Tech Medical School Will No Longer Use Race as a Factor in Admissions Decisions

Texas Tech Medical School Will No Longer Use Race as a Factor in Admissions Decisions

This is the first agreement reached between the Trump administration and a college to forgo using race as a factor in the admissions process.

In Memoriam: Donald Stewart, 1938-2019

In Memoriam: Donald Stewart, 1938-2019

Dr. Stewart served as the sixth president of historically Black Spelman College in Atlanta from 1977 to 1986. He left Spelman College to become president of The College Board.

Georgetown Students Approve a Fee to Benefit the Descendants of the University's Slaves

Georgetown Students Approve a Fee to Benefit the Descendants of the University’s Slaves

The student body at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., overwhelmingly approval a measure that will add $27.20 to their tuiition bills each semester. The fee will be used to create a fund that will benefit the descendants of the 272 people who were enslaved by the university.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Notable Honors and Awards for Six African Americans in Higher Education

Notable Honors and Awards for Six African Americans in Higher Education

The honorees are Nafissa Thompson-Spires of the University of Illinois, Gregory S. Carr of Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis, Tayari Jones of Emory University in Atlanta, Jamilla Lyiscott of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Wilma Mishoe of Delaware State University, and Vinette Gordon of Fayetteville State University in North Carolina.

Two Black Scholars Named to Endowed Professorships at Yale University

Two Black Scholars Named to Endowed Professorships at Yale University

At Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, Daphne Ann Brooks has been named the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of African American Studies and Anton M. Bennett has been named the Dorys McConnell Duberg Professor of Pharmacology.

Syracuse University's Kal Alston Elected President of the Philosophy of Education Society

Syracuse University’s Kal Alston Elected President of the Philosophy of Education Society

Dr. Alston currently serves as a professor of cultural foundations of education and associate dean for academic affairs in the School of Education at Syracuse University in New York. She has been very active within the Philosophy of Education Society for the past 30 years.

In Memoriam: Lorraine Elizabeth Green Branham, 1952-2019

In Memoriam: Lorraine Elizabeth Green Branham, 1952-2019

A long-time journalist Lorraine Branham became dean of the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University in New York in 2008.

Racial Gaps in School Discipline Linked to Level of Implicit Racial Bias Among Local Population

Racial Gaps in School Discipline Linked to Level of Implicit Racial Bias Among Local Population

According to a new report by psychologists at Princeton University in New Jersey, there is a correlation between counties where the population has demonstrated a high-level of racial bias and large racial gaps in school discipline rates.

Jann Luciana Joseph Will Be the Next President of Georgia Gwinnett College

Jann Luciana Joseph Will Be the Next President of Georgia Gwinnett College

Currently, Dr. Joseph serves as interim chancellor of Indiana University South Bend. She was executive vice chancellor for academic affairs at the South Bend campus before she was asked to step into her current role. Earlier in her career, she served as dean of the College of Education at Eastern Michigan University.

Howard University Doctoral Student Discovers New Information About the Diet of Enslaved Africans

Howard University Doctoral Student Discovers New Information About the Diet of Enslaved Africans

By analyzing the soil at the African Burial Ground in New York City, Carter Clinton, the 2017-2018 Just Julian Scholar at Howard University, discovered a high level of strontium in the soil, which indicated a diet heavy with vegetables.

Shaun Harper Chosen to Lead the American Educational Research Association

Shaun Harper Chosen to Lead the American Educational Research Association

Currently, Dr. Harper serves as a Provost Professor in the Rossier School of Education and Marshall School of Business, the Clifford and Betty Allen Chair in Urban Leadership, and the founder and executive director of the Race and Equity Center at the University of Southern California.

Early School Interventions Can Reduce the Need for Disciplinary Actions With Young Black Males

Early School Interventions Can Reduce the Need for Disciplinary Actions With Young Black Males

According to a new study led by researchers at Stanford University, brief exercises that address middle school students’ worries about belonging can help young Black males develop better relationships with teachers and sharply reduce their risk of being disciplined years into the future.

Alicia Harvey-Smith Selected as the New President of Pittsburgh Technical College

Alicia Harvey-Smith Selected as the New President of Pittsburgh Technical College

Currently, Dr. Harvey-Smith serves as the executive vice chancellor at Lone Star College in Houston, Texas. Earlier in her career she served as president of River Valley Community College in Claremont, New Hampshire, and as vice president of student affairs at Baltimore City Community College.

Three African American Faculty Members Receive New Assignments

Three African American Faculty Members Receive New Assignments

Taking on new roles are Deondra Rose at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University, Eric Ashley Hairston at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and Sean Seymore at Vanderbilt University in Nashville.

A New Pathway for Grambling State University Students to Earn Chiropractic Doctorates

A New Pathway for Grambling State University Students to Earn Chiropractic Doctorates

Historically Black Grambling State University in Louisiana has partnered with Logan University in Chesterfield, Missouri, to create a pathway for students to earn their doctor of chiropractic degrees in just six years.

Three Black Scholars Appointed to Dean Posts at Colleges and Universities

Three Black Scholars Appointed to Dean Posts at Colleges and Universities

The three new deans are Karen Richardson at Princeton University in New Jersey, Leslie Grinage at Barnard College in New York City, and Glenda M. Prime at Morgan State University in Baltimore.

Tuskegee University and Asian Universities Partner on Environmentally Responsive Architecture

Tuskegee University and Asian Universities Partner on Environmentally Responsive Architecture

Historically Black Tuskegee University in Alabama has expanded an academic partnership with Kagoshima University in Japan and Diponegoro University in Indonesia. The three universities will develop an online course focused on environmentally responsive architecture and design.

Keisha Blain Wins Award For Best Book on African American Women's History

Keisha Blain Wins Award For Best Book on African American Women’s History

Keisha N. Blain, an assistant professor in the department of history at the University of Pittsburgh, was honored by the Organization of American Historians for her book on 20th-century Black women nationalists.

Big Sean Sponsors Entreprenurial Contest For HBCU Students

Big Sean Sponsors Entreprenurial Contest For HBCU Students

The contest, “Moguls in the Making,” gave HBCU students the opportunity to plan, develop, and present a business plan in front of their peers and a panel of judges. They also participated in workshops focused on various topics such as financial literacy, idea pitching, and building business models.

A Trio of African Americans in New Administrative Posts at Universities

A Trio of African Americans in New Administrative Posts at Universities

Taking on new roles are Dustin Bessette at Post University in Waterbury, Connecticut, Allia L. Carter at Virginia Union University in Richmond, and Kimberly L. Martin at the University of Louisville in Kentucky.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

University of Kentucky to Remove a Mural That Is Offensive to Many Black Students

University of Kentucky to Remove a Mural That Is Offensive to Many Black Students

During the Great Depression, Ann Rice O’Hanlon painted a 38 feet wide, 11 feet tall mural on Kentucky history in Memorial Hall. The mural depicts enslaved African Americas hunched in a field, Black musicians playing for White dancers, and a Native American threatening a White settler with a tomahawk.

Hollins University President Removes Digital Access to Four Yearbooks Containing Racist Imagery

Hollins University President Removes Digital Access to Four Yearbooks Containing Racist Imagery

The president of Hollins University, a liberal arts educational institution for women in Roanoke, Virginia, removed online access to four of the university’s yearbooks. Those particular issues of the university’s yearbooks contain photos of students and faculty in blackface or have other racist imagery.

In Memoriam: Kavin Grant, 1981-2019

In Memoriam: Kavin Grant, 1981-2019

Kavin Grant, an associate professor of dance at Alabama State University, recently was killed in a car accident. Earlier in his career, he taught at West Chester University, Temple University, Penn State, the University of the Arts, the University of Akron, Rowan University, Muhlenberg College, and Jackson State University.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Vandals Deface a Memorial to Enslaved Black Workers at the University of North Carolina

Vandals Deface a Memorial to Enslaved Black Workers at the University of North Carolina

The Unsung Founders Memorial was installed in 2005 to honor the enslaved and free African-Americans who helped construct buildings on campus. Vandals wrote racist language on the memorial in permanent marker and also urinated on it.

In Memoriam: Patricia Officer Evans, 1941-2019

In Memoriam: Patricia Officer Evans, 1941-2019

Patricia Officer Evans was a longtime educator who served as First Lady at Southwestern Christian College for more than a half century.

Four African-American Scholars Elected Members of the American Academy of Arts and Letters

Four African-American Scholars Elected Members of the American Academy of Arts and Letters

The American Academy of Arts and Letters recently inducted 11 individuals into the 250-member honorary society. New members are elected only upon the death of other members. Of the 11 new members, four are African Americans.

Black Male Athletes Make Up a High Percentage of Black Male Enrollments in Power 5 Conferences

Black Male Athletes Make Up a High Percentage of Black Male Enrollments in Power 5 Conferences

The report notes that currently, Black men represent less than 10 percent of total full-time, undergraduate male degree seekers at nearly all of the colleges in each of the Power Five conferences.

Tyrone Jackson Appointed President of Mississippi Delta Community College

Tyrone Jackson Appointed President of Mississippi Delta Community College

Dr. Jackson currently serves as vice president for the Utica campus and district dean of students of Hinds Community College in Mississippi. Earlier in his career, Dr. Jackson held a number of administrative posts at Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College.