Racial Differences in Interactions Between Children and Parents in American Households

A new report from the U.S. Census Bureau documents racial differences in interactions between children and parents in American households.

The data show that 75.6 percent of non-Hispanic White parents read to their young children at least five days a week. In African American households, only 54.5 percent of parents read to their young children at least five days a week.

More than 85 percent of non-Hispanic White parents reported going on two or more outings per week with their children. For Black households the figure was just slightly lower at 79.8 percent.

Some 85 percent of both Black and White parents reported that they ate dinner with their children at least five days a week. About 35 percent of both Black and White children were highly engaged in their education and cared a great deal about doing well in school.

The full report, A Child’s Day: Parental Interaction, School Engagement, and Extracurricular Activities: 2014, can be downloaded by clicking here.


Leave a Reply



Due to incidents of abuse and harassment that have occurred in the past, JBHE will not publish telephone numbers or email addresses of individuals in this space. If you want to contact someone in a particular article, we suggest you contact them directly not in an open forum.