Archive for November, 2018

Temple University Adds Tupac Shakur Memorabilia to its Blockson Afro-American Collection

Temple University Adds Tupac Shakur Memorabilia to its Blockson Afro-American Collection

Tupac Shakur was a prominent voice of 1990s hip-hop and remains one of the most influential artists of his generation, having sold more than 42 million copies of his albums and singles. Temple University in Philadelphia has acquired a dozen documents handwritten by Shakur and two pieces of jewelry.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

In Memoriam: Sharon Tolbert-Glover, 1940-2018

In Memoriam: Sharon Tolbert-Glover, 1940-2018

When Sharon Tolbert-Glover was only 15 years old, she became a nun at the convent of the Servites of Mary in Illinois. When she was assigned to a parish in suburban Chicago, the all-White congregants refused to accept her, causing her to resign from the order. She later had a long career in higher education.

Virginia Tech Launches New Initiative to Bring a More Diverse Group of Students to Campus

Virginia Tech Launches New Initiative to Bring a More Diverse Group of Students to Campus

Virginia Tech has launched a new initiative, the Calhoun Discovery Program, that works with Virginia communities that typically graduate a lower number of college-bound high school students.

In Memoriam: Janette Hoston Harris, 1939-2018

In Memoriam: Janette Hoston Harris, 1939-2018

In 1960, Janette Hoston Harris was one of six Southern University students arrested for attempting to desegregate an all-White lunch counter. As a result of this, the governor of Louisiana ordered the expulsion of all six students from the university and prohibited them from attending any college in the state.

University Study Finds Children as Young as Seven Suffer from the Impacts of Discrimination

University Study Finds Children as Young as Seven Suffer from the Impacts of Discrimination

Scholars at the University of California, Riverside have found that children as young as seven are sensitive to and suffer from the impacts of discrimination. The study also suggests that a strong sense of ethnic-racial identity is a significant buffer against these negative effects.

Seven African Americans Elected Into the National Academy of Medicine

Seven African Americans Elected Into the National Academy of Medicine

A JBHE analysis of the list of the 75 members of the latest cohort elected into the National Academy of Medicine finds that it appears that seven, or 9 percent, are Black. Most have current affiliations with academic institutions in the United States.

Less-Educated Black Women May Face Greater Risk of Chronic Diseases Due to Discrimination

Less-Educated Black Women May Face Greater Risk of Chronic Diseases Due to Discrimination

A new study from the University of California, Berkeley has found that less-educated African-American women who report experiencing high levels of racial discrimination may face greater risk of developing chronic diseases.

The Racial Scoring Gap on the SAT College Entrance Examination

The Racial Scoring Gap on the SAT College Entrance Examination

The results showed that only 21 percent of African American test takers met the college and career readiness benchmark for both reading and mathematics. Nearly 60 percent of Whites met the readiness benchmarks in both reading and mathematics.

Most Americans Underestimate the Environmental Concerns of Blacks and Other Ethnic Groups

Most Americans Underestimate the Environmental Concerns of Blacks and Other Ethnic Groups

A new study by researchers at several leading colleges and universities has found that most Americans underestimate just how concerned African Americans and lower-income people are about environmental threats.

Kimberly Dowdell Elected President of the National Organization of Minority Architects

Kimberly Dowdell Elected President of the National Organization of Minority Architects

Kimberly Dowdell is a faculty member in the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan. She is a licensed architect and partner with Century Partners, a Detroit-based real estate firm focused on equitable neighborhood revitalization.

White Student at Historically Black North Carolina Central University Posts Racist Comments

White Student at Historically Black North Carolina Central University Posts Racist Comments

The student used a racial slur in a post on Facebook. She also stated “wish I could take credit” under a screenshot of a story about explosive devices that were sent to the residence of President Obama.

Winston-Salem State University Establishes a Physical Therapy Residence Program

Winston-Salem State University Establishes a Physical Therapy Residence Program

Historically Black Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina has partnered with Novant Health to create the first physical therapy residence program based at a HBCU. The new 12-month program will focus on neurologic care.

Three Black Women Faculty Members Appointed to New Positions at State Universities

Three Black Women Faculty Members Appointed to New Positions at State Universities

Taking on new assignments are Timiebi Aganaba-Jeanty at the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University, Leslie R. Walker-Harding at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and Elizabeth Evans at Mississippi Valley State University.

Grambling State University Launches First Undergraduate Cybersecurity Degree in Louisiana

Grambling State University Launches First Undergraduate Cybersecurity Degree in Louisiana

Historically Black Grambling State University in Louisiana has received approval from the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors to offer a bachelor of science degree in cybersecurity. When the new program begins in the fall of 2019 it will be the first bachelor’s degree in the field in the state of Louisiana.

Honors or Awards for Five Black Scholars From the Academic World

Honors or Awards for Five Black Scholars From the Academic World

The honorees are Jerome H. Holland, former president of what is now Delaware State University, Tequila Harris of the Georgia Institute of Technology, Zachery S. Mitcham of North Carolina Central University, Taiyon J. Coleman of St. Catherine University in Minnesota, and Eric Yirenkyi Danquah, who is affiliated with Cornell University.

Langston University to Offer Nursing Degree Program at Campus in Ardmore, Oklahoma

Langston University to Offer Nursing Degree Program at Campus in Ardmore, Oklahoma

The University Center of Southern Oklahoma in Ardmore will offer a bachelor’s program for nursing students through historically Black Langston University. Classes for the new program will start in spring 2019. Langston University hopes to offer additional degree programs at the Ardmore campus in the future.

A Trio of African Americans in New Administrative Posts in Higher Education

A Trio of African Americans in New Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Taking on new administrative roles are Jeanell N. Hughes at Cleveland State University in Ohio, Tina Smith at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, and Kayton Carter at the University of California, Davis.

In Memoriam: Percy J. Vaughn, Jr., 1932-2018

In Memoriam: Percy J. Vaughn, Jr., 1932-2018

Percy J. Vaughn, Jr. was the founding dean of Alabama State University’s College of Business Administration. He joined the faculty at the university in 1975 and served as a professor of marketing until his retirement 35 years later in 2010.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.