Archive for September, 2018

Enrollment Surges at a Number of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Enrollment Surges at a Number of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Historically Black colleges and universities all over the nation are seeing increases in enrollments. Here are some examples.

Joseph Carter Corbin is a 2018 Inductee Into the Ohio Civil Rights Hall of Fame

Joseph Carter Corbin is a 2018 Inductee Into the Ohio Civil Rights Hall of Fame

The son of former Virginia slaves, Dr. Corbin was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, in 1833. He was the third African American to attend Ohio University and the second to complete a bachelor’s degree. He founded and led the educational institution now known as the University of Arkansas, Pine Bluff for 27 years.

Google Partners with Seven HBCUs for Tech Exchange Program

Google Partners with Seven HBCUs for Tech Exchange Program

Google has expanded its effort to boost diversity in Silicon Valley. A new program will provide students from seven historically Black colleges and universities with the opportunity to study computer science at the company’s headquarters in California.

Seven Black Scholars Appointed Department Chairs at Bowie State University in Maryland

Seven Black Scholars Appointed Department Chairs at Bowie State University in Maryland

The new department chairs at Bowie State University in Maryland are LaTanya Brown-Robertson, Gina Lewis, Wilbur Parker, George Ude, Altwan Whitefield, Otis Williams, and Azene Zenebe.

Howard University Cancer Center Expands Access to Clinical Cancer Trials for African Americans

Howard University Cancer Center Expands Access to Clinical Cancer Trials for African Americans

Clinical trials provide patients with access to leading physicians, breakthrough medicines, advanced technologies, and groundbreaking treatments before they are widely available to the public. Historically, African Americans have been largely underrepresented in clinical trial research.

New Administrative Positions for Seven African Americans in Higher Education

New Administrative Positions for Seven African Americans in Higher Education

Here is this week’s roundup of African Americans who have been appointed to new administrative positions at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

In Memoriam: Robert Judson (1941-2018)

In Memoriam: Robert Judson (1941-2018)

Dr. Judson began his career at Pasco-Hernando State College in Florida in 1972. He became the school’s first instructor, first recruiter, and first financial aid coordinator. In 1976, he was promoted to dean of East Campus and in 1994 he became the school’s second president.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Nonprofit Established by University of Cincinnati Students Brings Solar Power to Uganda  Schools

Nonprofit Established by University of Cincinnati Students Brings Solar Power to Uganda Schools

Since the nonprofit establishment by engineering students at the University of Cincinnati, volunteers have installed solar energy systems in 18 schools across Uganda and plans to complete installations at 50 schools by 2025.

New Book Provides Insight Into the Influence of an 18th-Century Slave Ship Woodcut Engraving

New Book Provides Insight Into the Influence of an 18th-Century Slave Ship Woodcut Engraving

The original wood engraving of a slave ship was created in 1788 by British abolitionists who intended to influence the legislators who regulated the slave trade. It was the first image to expose ordinary people to the barbarism of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Bowdoin College Scholar Explores the Issue of Slavery in Relation to the State of Maine

Bowdoin College Scholar Explores the Issue of Slavery in Relation to the State of Maine

Brian Purnell, an associate professor of history and Africana studies at Bowdoin College in Maine, believes that even though Maine’s statehood nearly 200 years ago kept the balance between slave-states and free-states, it strengthened slavery elsewhere.

University of Maryland Creates a "Safe Space" for White Students

University of Maryland Creates a “Safe Space” for White Students

A flyer from the University of Maryland’s Counseling Center stated that the group, called White Awake, was a place for “White students to explore their experiences, questions, reactions, and feelings” on race.

New Duties for 13 Black Faculty Members in Higher Education

New Duties for 13 Black Faculty Members in Higher Education

Here is this week’s listing of African American faculty members from colleges and universities throughout the United States who have been appointed to new positions or have been assigned new duties.

Six Black Faculty Members in New Posts at Brown University in Rhode Island

Six Black Faculty Members in New Posts at Brown University in Rhode Island

The new Black faculty members at Brown University are Aliyyah Abdur-Rahman in American studies and English, Lisa Biggs in Africana studies, Kevin Quashie in English, RaMell Ross in visual art, Brandon Ogbunugafor in ecology and environmental biology, and Patience Moyo in health services.

Black Male Students Benefit Academically From Having Black Male Teachers

Black Male Students Benefit Academically From Having Black Male Teachers

Some 77 percent of elementary and high school teachers are White women. As a result, some Black male students may never be taught by someone who looks like them. When young Blacks have an African American teacher in elementary school, they are more likely to attend college.

Lawrence D. Bobo Named Dean of Social Sciences at Harvard University

Lawrence D. Bobo Named Dean of Social Sciences at Harvard University

Dr. Bobo currently serves as the W.E.B. Du Bois Professor of the Social Sciences and chair of the department of African American Studies. He has been a Harvard faculty member since 1997. Earlier, he taught at UCLA and Stanford University.

Research Finds That Racism Continues to Plague the Housing Market in the United States

Research Finds That Racism Continues to Plague the Housing Market in the United States

Researchers at the University of New Mexico have conducted a study that found that racial stereotypes and discrimination continue to play a role in the process of finding and purchasing a home.

Two African American Women Appointed to Dean Positions at Universities

Two African American Women Appointed to Dean Positions at Universities

Shetina M. Jones has been appointed dean of students at Wilberforce University in Wilberforce, Ohio, and Juline E. Mills has been named dean of the College of Education, Health, and Human Services at Westfield State University in Massachusetts.

University Study Finds That Black Men Are More Likely to Be the Victims of Killings by Police

University Study Finds That Black Men Are More Likely to Be the Victims of Killings by Police

Official police reports showed that police related deaths accounted for 4 percent of male homicides, while the researchers found this to actually be as high as 8 percent. During a six-year period, Black men were killed by police at the highest rate; 2.1 per 100,000 men.

George Walker, Educator and a Giant of the Music Industry, Dies at Age 96

George Walker, Educator and a Giant of the Music Industry, Dies at Age 96

Dr. Walker composed nearly 100 pieces over his lifetime. One of his most famous is Lyric for Strings which was inspired by the death of his grandmother, a former slave. In 1996, he became the first African American recipient of the Pulitzer Price for Music.

Hurricane Florence Wreaks Havoc on North and South Carolina HBCUs

Hurricane Florence Wreaks Havoc on North and South Carolina HBCUs

The historically Black colleges and universities of North Carolina and South Carolina were among the many institutions affected by Hurricane Florence this past week.

Seven African Americans Who Have Been Named to Adminstrative Posts in Higher Education

Seven African Americans Who Have Been Named to Adminstrative Posts in Higher Education

Here is this week’s roundup of African Americans who have been appointed to new administrative positions at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Fayetteville State University Offers Affordable Online Bachelor's Degrees for Community College Grads

Fayetteville State University Offers Affordable Online Bachelor’s Degrees for Community College Grads

Historically Black Fayetteville State University has signed an agreement with Guilford Technical Community College in Jamestown, North Carolina, that will allow GTCC graduates to complete an online bachelor’s degree through Fayetteville State University for no more than $10,000.

Honors and Awards for Four Black Scholars or Administrators

Honors and Awards for Four Black Scholars or Administrators

The honorees are Lance R. Collins, dean of engineering at Cornell University, La’Kitha Hughes, a facilities administrator at Jackson State University in Mississippi, architect David Adjaye, who was honored by Washington University in St. Louis and Jackie Hankins-Kent of Temple University.

Charles  R. Drew University of Medical Science Teams Up With Medical School in Dominica

Charles R. Drew University of Medical Science Teams Up With Medical School in Dominica

A new agreement between historically Black, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles and the Ross University School of Medicine in Portsmouth, Dominica, has established joint education programs that aim to increase the number of physicians in underserved areas in the United States.

Seven New African American Faculty at Winston-Salem State University

Seven New African American Faculty at Winston-Salem State University

The new African American faculty members at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina are Douglas Bates, Chinno Ingram, Quiteya D. Walker, La-Tika S. Douthit, Aaron Goodson, Radscheda Nobles, and Rennae Stowe.

In Memoriam: Linda Rae Daniels, 1953-2018

In Memoriam: Linda Rae Daniels, 1953-2018

Linda R. Daniels worked for Ohio University for 18 years, most recently as director of multicultural programs. Earlier, she was on the staff at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown for 14 years.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Yale University Scholar Urges a More Holistic Approach to Medical School Admissions

Yale University Scholar Urges a More Holistic Approach to Medical School Admissions

Inginia Genao, of the department of medicine at Yale University believes that the standardized Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) has created an unfair barrier for African Americans and other racial and ethnic minorities aspiring to start medical school.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Washington and Lee University President Rejects Plans to Convert Lee Chapel Into a Museum

Washington and Lee University President Rejects Plans to Convert Lee Chapel Into a Museum

An advisory panel of faculty, staff, alumni, and students suggested that Lee Chapel should be converted into a museum and key campus events should no longer be held there. Robert E. Lee and his family are buried underneath the chapel.

African American Cheerleader Files Suit Against Kennesaw State University in Georgia

African American Cheerleader Files Suit Against Kennesaw State University in Georgia

Tommia Dean, a former cheerleader at Kennesaw State University, is suing the university for violating her right to freedom of speech. Last season Dean knelt during the playing of the national anthem to protest police brutality directed against African Americans.

Two African American Men Stepping Down From High-Level Administrative Positions

Two African American Men Stepping Down From High-Level Administrative Positions

Walter Robinson, associate vice chancellor of enrollment management at the University of California, Davis, is retiring and David Williams II, vice chancellor for athletics and university affairs and athletics director at Vanderbilt University, is stepping down but will continue to serve on the university’s law school faculty.