Archive for July, 2018

Eight African Americans Who Are Taking on New Administrative Duties in Higher Education

Eight African Americans Who Are Taking on New Administrative Duties in Higher Education

Here is this week’s roundup of African Americans who have been appointed to new administrative positions at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

In Memoriam: Jacqueline Williams Paddio, 1957-2018

In Memoriam: Jacqueline Williams Paddio, 1957-2018

Paddio served as vice president for student affairs at Talladega College in Alabama from 2008 to 2015. During her tenure, enrollment at the college quadrupled.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

College of William and Mary to Erect Marker at Site of Early School for African Americans

College of William and Mary to Erect Marker at Site of Early School for African Americans

In 1760, the Associates of Dr. Bray, a London-based charity opened a school for enslaved and free Black children on the campus of the College of William and Mary in Wiliamsburg, Virginia. The college will place a historical marker at the site where the school is believed to have been located.

Haverford College Students Serve as Mentors to Young Boys of Color in the Local Community

Haverford College Students Serve as Mentors to Young Boys of Color in the Local Community

The educational initiative SURGE (Sons Uniting, Realizing Goals of Excellence) pairs up young African American boys in the surrounding community with men of color at Haverford College.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Tuskegee and Auburn Universities Team Up to Boost Diversity in Academic Veterinary Medicine

Tuskegee and Auburn Universities Team Up to Boost Diversity in Academic Veterinary Medicine

Under the agreement, a graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Tuskegee University will be trained as a resident in radiology at Auburn University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital. The student will become board-certified and return to Tuskegee as a faculty member.

Project Aims to Expand Research on Obscure African American Novels

Project Aims to Expand Research on Obscure African American Novels

The Black Book Interactive Project at the University of Kansas is building the first searchable digital collection of previously unavailable and understudied African-American novels. Maryemma Graham, University Distinguished Professor of English, is overseeing the project.

The First Woman to Earn a Ph.D. in Computer Science at North Carolina A&T State University

The First Woman to Earn a Ph.D. in Computer Science at North Carolina A&T State University

Dr. Siobahn Day’s research focused on how to determine originating sources of statements made on social media outlets. The research aimed to determine the sources of fake news that have become rampant on social media platforms.

University of Kansas Aims to Increase Diversity in Its Engineering Programs

University of Kansas Aims to Increase Diversity in Its Engineering Programs

The KUEST (KU Engineering, Science and Technology) program aims to expand and fill the pipeline of underrepresented engineers, including women and minorities, with an array of programs aimed at students as young as middle school.

Patti Bellinger Named Chief of Staff for the New President of Harvard University

Patti Bellinger Named Chief of Staff for the New President of Harvard University

Bellinger has been serving as a lecturer and senior fellow at the Kennedy School at the university. Earlier, Bellinger was executive director of the Center for Public Leadership and executive director of executive education at Harvard Business School.

A Racial Employment Gap for Students Entering Two-Year Colleges

A Racial Employment Gap for Students Entering Two-Year Colleges

A new report from the U.S. Department of Education shows that slightly more than 14 percent of entering Black students at two-year colleges were employed full-time, compared to 20.5 percent of entering White students at these institutions. Whites were also more likely than Blacks to hold part-time jobs.

A Check-Up on Black Faculty at U.S. Medical Schools

A Check-Up on Black Faculty at U.S. Medical Schools

New data from the Association of American Medical Colleges shows a total of 174,570 faculty members at U.S. medical schools in 2017. Of these, 5,769 are Black. Thus, in 2017, Blacks made up only 3.3 percent of all medical school faculty.

Huge Racial Disparities in Incarceration Rates Have Created a Public Health Crisis in Black America

Huge Racial Disparities in Incarceration Rates Have Created a Public Health Crisis in Black America

A new study by researchers at the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago finds that young adults whose parents have been incarcerated during their childhood are less likely to obtain quality healthcare and are more likely to participate in unhealthy behaviors.

The New President of the College Sports Information Directors of America

The New President of the College Sports Information Directors of America

Rob Knox, the associate director for athletics communications at Towson University in Maryland was chosen to serve as the 64th president of the College Sports Information Directors of America. He is the second African American to serve as the organization’s leader.

Study Finds Link Between Residential Racial Segregation and Firearm Homicide Rates

Study Finds Link Between Residential Racial Segregation and Firearm Homicide Rates

A new study by researchers at the Boston University School of Public Health finds that states with a higher degree of residential racial segregation have higher racial disparities in homicide rates by firearms. This remains true even when other racial inequalities are accounted for, according to the authors.

New Assignments in Higher Education for Five Black Scholars

New Assignments in Higher Education for Five Black Scholars

Taking on new roles are Sanyu Mojola at Princeton University in New Jersey, Hillary A. Potter at the University of Colorado, Echol Nix Jr. at Claflin University in Orangeburg, South Carolina, Tiffany A. Flowers at Georgia State University Perimeter College, and Kimya Dennis at Salem College in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

South Carolina State and Clemson Universities to Offer Dual-Degree Program in Physics

South Carolina State and Clemson Universities to Offer Dual-Degree Program in Physics

Under the plan, students will spend the first three years at South Carolina State and then transfer to Clemson for the last two years of the program. Students who complete the program will receive a bachelor’s degree from South Carolina State and a master’s degree from Clemson.

The First Black Woman Inducted Into the National Athletic Trainers' Association Hall of Fame

The First Black Woman Inducted Into the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Hall of Fame

Rene Revis Shingles, a professor in the School of Rehabilitation and Medical Sciences at Central Michigan University, was elected into the Hall of Fame of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association. She is the first African American woman to be inducted into the Hall of Fame.

Howard University Partners With Carnegie Mellon for Engineering Initiative

Howard University Partners With Carnegie Mellon for Engineering Initiative

This partnership between historically Black Howard University and Carnegie Mellon University will cover a wide range of initiatives between the two institutions, including a dual-degree Ph.D. program that will allow students to earn a doctoral degree in engineering from both schools.

Five African Americans Appointed to New Administrative Posts at Colleges and Universities

Five African Americans Appointed to New Administrative Posts at Colleges and Universities

Taking on new duties are Greg Hunley at Mississsippi University for Women, Janet Wormack at Houston Community College in Texas, Tommye Sutton at the University of Virginia, Sheriah Dixon at Syracuse University and Crystal L. Wheeler at Howard University.

Texas Southern University Teams Up With Tarrant County College

Texas Southern University Teams Up With Tarrant County College

Texas Southern University, the historically Black educational institution in Houston, has signed an agreement with Tarrant County College in Fort Worth, Texas, to facilitate the transfer process between the two institutions.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

University of Missouri Names Building After a Black Woman It Had Rejected for Admission in 1939

University of Missouri Names Building After a Black Woman It Had Rejected for Admission in 1939

In 1939, Lucile Bluford, who had worked as a journalist for several newspapers, applied for admission to the University of Missouri School of Journalism. She was accepted for admission but later was turned away when university officials saw the color of her skin.

New Penn State Program Aims to Help Prepare South African University Leaders

New Penn State Program Aims to Help Prepare South African University Leaders

The College of Education at Pennsylvania State University has entered into a partnership agreement with three universities in the Republic of South Africa. The program is called “Phakamisa,” which means “to grow or lift up.” The goal of the program is to train the next generation of academic leaders for South Africa.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

University of Utah Debuts New Online Archive on the History of Blacks in the Mormon Church

University of Utah Debuts New Online Archive on the History of Blacks in the Mormon Church

The digital history database – Century of Black Mormons – documents Black participation in the Church of Latter-day Saints between 1830 and 1930.

Howard University to Administer the Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program

Howard University to Administer the Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program

The Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program provides 30 graduate fellowships annually to highly qualified seniors and college graduates committed to joining the Department of State’s Foreign Service.

A Quartet of Black Scholars Who Have Been Appointed to Dean Positions

A Quartet of Black Scholars Who Have Been Appointed to Dean Positions

Newly appointed to dean posts are Terrence Blackman at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn, New York, Elaine M. O’Neal at North Carolina Central University, Marshall F. Stevenson Jr. at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and Larry Gladney at Yale University.

New Report Reveals Racial Differences in Occupations Four Years After College

New Report Reveals Racial Differences in Occupations Four Years After College

A new report from the U.S. Department of Education finds that 8 percent of African Americans who graduated from college in 2008 were employed in STEM fields in 2012. For Whites the figure was 11.4 percent.

The First African American Superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy

The First African American Superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy

Darryl A. Williams is the 60th superintendent of the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York. He is the first African American to serve in this role in the 216-year history of the academy.

University of Pennsylvania Research Uncovers Its Early Ties to Slavery

University of Pennsylvania Research Uncovers Its Early Ties to Slavery

Research has shown that no fewer than 75 of the university’s early trustees owned at least one enslaved person. The labor of enslaved people was used to support and care for Penn faculty and students.

Justice Department Rescinds Obama-Era Guidance Documents on Affirmative Action

Justice Department Rescinds Obama-Era Guidance Documents on Affirmative Action

Attorney General Jeff Sessions called the guidance documents on affirmative action and race-sensitive admissions “unnecessary, outdated, inconsistent with existing law, or otherwise improper.”

Academic Study Finds Church-Going African Americans Suffer Fewer Mental Health Issues

Academic Study Finds Church-Going African Americans Suffer Fewer Mental Health Issues

A new study by researchers at the University of Michigan and Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, finds that religion is a major beneficial factor for African Americans in helping them deal with the pressures of American life.