Archive for April, 2018

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Two Long-Time Faculty Members Are Retiring From Elizabeth City State University

Two Long-Time Faculty Members Are Retiring From Elizabeth City State University

Linda Hayden is retiring after 38 years of teaching at Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina and Claudie Mackey has been on the faculty there since 1977.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Gregory Vincent Resigns as President of Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Gregory Vincent Resigns as President of Hobart and William Smith Colleges

The resignation comes after allegations surfaced that Dr. Vincent plagiarized part of his doctoral dissertation at the University of Pennsylvania.

Drake University Acquires the Papers of Long-Time Iowa Legislator and Alumnus Wayne Ford

Drake University Acquires the Papers of Long-Time Iowa Legislator and Alumnus Wayne Ford

Wayne Ford served from 1996 to 2010 in the Iowa House of Representatives. Ford was also the founder of Urban Dreams, a nonprofit organization that aims to improve the lives of residents in low-income neighborhoods.

Henry Louis Gates Jr. Awarded the 2018 Creativity Laureate Prize

Henry Louis Gates Jr. Awarded the 2018 Creativity Laureate Prize

Henry Louis Gates Jr., the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard University, was honored recently at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

The College of William and Mary to Honor Its First African American Residential Students

The College of William and Mary to Honor Its First African American Residential Students

In the fall of 1967, Lynn Briley, Karen Ely, and Janet Brown, became the first African American students to live in residential housing on the campus of the College of William and Mary in Virginia. All three graduated four years later in 1971.

Daniel A. Wubah Will Be the Next President of Millersville University in Pennsylvania

Daniel A. Wubah Will Be the Next President of Millersville University in Pennsylvania

Dr. Wubah, a native of Ghana, is a professor of biology at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia. He served as provost at Washington and Lee University from 2013 to 2016. Earlier, Dr. Wubah was deputy provost at Virginia Tech.

Students of Color Are Shortchanged in Higher Education Spending by States

Students of Color Are Shortchanged in Higher Education Spending by States

A new report from the Center for American Progress finds that the amount spent per student of color — defined here as Black and Latino students — at public two- and four-year colleges is more than $1,000 less per year than what is spent on their White counterparts.

Lena Hill Appointed Dean of the College at Washington and Lee University

Lena Hill Appointed Dean of the College at Washington and Lee University

Currently, Dr. Hill is senior associate to the president, interim chief diversity officer, and associate vice president at the University of Iowa. She joined the faculty at the University of Iowa in 2006 with a joint appointment in the departments of English and African American studies.

Study Finds Healthcare Clinicians Have Low Expectations for Their Black Patients

Study Finds Healthcare Clinicians Have Low Expectations for Their Black Patients

A new study finds that doctors and other healthcare providers rated White patients as significantly more likely to improve, more likely to adhere to recommended treatments, and be more personally responsible for their health than Black patients.

Karrie Dixon Is the New Leader of Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina

Karrie Dixon Is the New Leader of Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina

Dr. Dixon has been a senior administrator for the University of North Carolina System since 2008. Most recently, she has served as vice president for academic and student affairs overseeing the 17 campuses of the university system.

Study Reveals Obstacles Faced by Black Men in Doctoral Programs in Engineering

Study Reveals Obstacles Faced by Black Men in Doctoral Programs in Engineering

A new study led by researchers at Iowa State University, the University of Alabama, and the University of Utah examines the experiences of Black men in doctoral programs in engineering. The study found that for Black men in these graduate degree programs, race was a greater obstacle than they expected.

St. Catherine University in Minnesota Appoints Tarshia Stanley to Dean Post

St. Catherine University in Minnesota Appoints Tarshia Stanley to Dean Post

Tarshia Stanley will be the next dean of the School of Humanities, Arts, and Sciences at St. Catherine University in St. Paul, Minnesota. Dr. Stanley has been serving as an associate professor of English and director of the E.W. Githii Honors Program at Spelman College in Atlanta.

Racially Insenstive Photos Posted by Fraternity Members at California Polytechnic State University

Racially Insenstive Photos Posted by Fraternity Members at California Polytechnic State University

The photos included a member of the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity dressed in blackface and other members dressed in what was referred to as “gangsta” attire.

Jackson State University Wins the 29th Annual Honda Campus All-Star Challenge

Jackson State University Wins the 29th Annual Honda Campus All-Star Challenge

Recently, the 29th Honda Campus All-Star Challenge National Championship Tournament was held in Torrance, California. Jackson State University emerged as the winner of the competition that involved teams from 48 HBCUs.

Four Black Scholars Taking on New Faculty Roles in Higher Education

Four Black Scholars Taking on New Faculty Roles in Higher Education

Taking on new assignments are Valerie Babb at Emory University in Atlanta, Amandu Jacky Kaba at Seton Hall University in New Jersey, Kimberly Hardy at Fayetteville State University in North Carolina, and Emile Diouf at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts.

Two Historically Black Medical Schools Team Up With the University of Zambia

Two Historically Black Medical Schools Team Up With the University of Zambia

Under the agreement students and faculty at Meharry Medical College and the Morehouse School of Medicine will participate in an exchange program centered on seven core areas of health science: HIV/AIDS, cancer, HPV, late-onset diabetes, hypertension, infectious disease, and malnutrition.

Tulane's Jesmyn Ward to Receive the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award in Fiction

Tulane’s Jesmyn Ward to Receive the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award in Fiction

Jesmyn Ward, an associate professor of English at Tulane University in New Orleans, will receive the fiction award at the 83rd Annual Anisfield-Wolf Book Award ceremony in Cleveland this September. She is the only woman to win two National Book Awards.

Hampton University in Virginia to Launch the Center for Caribbean Health Research

Hampton University in Virginia to Launch the Center for Caribbean Health Research

The center will strive to eliminate health disparities in Caribbean nations and also for diaspora populations in the United States. Partners in the effort will include the University of the Bahamas, St. George’s University in Grenada, the Pan American Health Organization, and the Caribbean Public Health Agency.

Five African Americans Named to New Administrative Posts at Universities

Five African Americans Named to New Administrative Posts at Universities

Taking on new duties are Nsombi B. Ricketts at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, Renita Miller at Princeton University in New Jersey, Keith E. Hall at Azusa Pacific University in California, Neijma Celestine-Donnor at the University of Maryland, and Lisa Griffin at Vanderbilt University in Nashville.

African Americans Accepted for Admission at High-Ranking Colleges and Universities

African Americans Accepted for Admission at High-Ranking Colleges and Universities

Recently, the nation’s highest-ranked colleges and universities informed applicants if they had been accepted for admission into the Class of 2022. Some of the nation’s most selective institutions provided acceptance data broken down by race and ethnicity.

Saint Louis University Honors the Late Black Scholar Norman White

Saint Louis University Honors the Late Black Scholar Norman White

Saint Louis University in Missouri has announced that it is establishing the Norman A. White Lecture that will present speakers “who embody the spirit of and commitment to social justice possessed by the late Saint Louis University faculty member.” Dr. White died last December at the age of 64.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

How Well Do Graduates of Law Schools at HBCUs Perform on Bar Examinations?

How Well Do Graduates of Law Schools at HBCUs Perform on Bar Examinations?

The statistics show than nearly 90 percent of all 2015 law school graduates had passed a state bar examination within two years of graduating from law school. All of law schools at HBCUs had bar passage rates below the national average.

Historical Marker Honors a Tennessee State University Alumnus and Buffalo Soldier

Historical Marker Honors a Tennessee State University Alumnus and Buffalo Soldier

A Buffalo Soldier, Lt. William McBryar earned the Medal of Honor for his “coolness, bravery and marksmanship” on March 7, 1890 when his 10th Cavalry troop was engaged with Apache warriors. He earned a bachelor’s degree at the age of 74 at what is now Tennessee State University.

National Humanities Center to Offer Research Fellowships to HBCU Faculty

National Humanities Center to Offer Research Fellowships to HBCU Faculty

The National Humanities Center in North Carolina has announced a new program that will provide residential fellowships for a dozen scholars from historically Black colleges and universities over the next three years. The program is made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Fields Where African Americans Earn Few or No Doctoral Degrees

Fields Where African Americans Earn Few or No Doctoral Degrees

Blacks are vastly underrepresented among doctoral degree recipients in some disciplines. For example, in 2016 African Americans earned only 1.8 percent of all doctorates awarded in physics to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Linda Oubré Selected as the Fifteenth President of Whittier College in California

Linda Oubré Selected as the Fifteenth President of Whittier College in California

For the past six years, Dr. Oubré has served as dean of the College of Business at San Francisco State University. Earlier, Dr. Oubré was executive director of corporate relations and business development, and chief diversity officer for the Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Davis.

Academic Study Examines Racial Disparity in Perinatal Depression

Academic Study Examines Racial Disparity in Perinatal Depression

A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois and Northwestern University find that Black and Latina women, who are at increased risk of perinatal depression, are less likely that their White peers to be screened or treated for the condition.

School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh Names Its Next Dean

School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh Names Its Next Dean

Currently, Dr. Martin is the Bob Benmosche Professor, chair of the department of civil engineering, and the founding director of the Risk Engineering and Systems Analytics Center at Clemson University in South Carolina.

Eliminating the Racial Gap in Infant Mortality Rates

Eliminating the Racial Gap in Infant Mortality Rates

A new report from the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University and the Insight Center for Community Economic Development provides information on the racial gap in infant mortality and offers strategies that may be employed to eliminate the disparity.

Benjamin Akande to Lead the Africa Initiative at Washington University in St. Louis

Benjamin Akande to Lead the Africa Initiative at Washington University in St. Louis

Dr. Akande, a Nigerian-born American citizen. was president of Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri, from 2015 to 2017. Earlier, he had been serving as a professor of economics and dean of the School of Business and Technology at Webster University in St. Louis.