Archive for November, 2017

Two African American Scholars in New Faculty Roles at Duke University

Two African American Scholars in New Faculty Roles at Duke University

Linda Burton, the James B. Duke Professor of Sociology, is the the new director for the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy in the Sanford School of Public Policy and Jarvis C. McInnis is a new assistant professor of English.

Delaware State University Partners With Brookdale Community College in New Jersey

Delaware State University Partners With Brookdale Community College in New Jersey

Under the agreement, students who earn a social science associate’s degree at Brookdale and who meet minimum grade requirements will be offered guaranteed transfer admission into bachelor’s degree programs at Delaware State.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

University of Virginia Is Making Progress in Increasing Black Students

University of Virginia Is Making Progress in Increasing Black Students

Since 2012, the number of Black students in the entering class at the University of Virginia is up 41.5 percent. In 2012, Blacks and biracial students with African American heritage made up 7.1 percent of the first-year students. this year the figure is 9.1 percent.

Princeton University Explores its Past Ties to the Institution of Slavery

Princeton University Explores its Past Ties to the Institution of Slavery

Following the lead of other peer institutions, Princeton University has debuted a new website documenting research on the university’s historical ties to the slavery. The first nine presidents of the university owned slaves at one point in their lives.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Spelman and Morehouse Students Reach Agreement to Call Off Hunger Strike

Spelman and Morehouse Students Reach Agreement to Call Off Hunger Strike

Students began a hunger strike on November 2 to raise awareness about food insecurity on their campuses. The strike was called off after administrators agreed to allow meals on prepaid food plans at the schools that were not used to be donated to hungry students.

A New Life for the Last Remaining Structure of Straight University in New Orleans

A New Life for the Last Remaining Structure of Straight University in New Orleans

In 1871, Straight University bought a home at 1423 North Claiborne Avenue in New Orleans that was used as a boarding house and later a dining hall. The building is the last remaining structure that was once part of Straight University.

Ladee Hubbard to Receive the Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence

Ladee Hubbard to Receive the Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence

Ladee Hubbard, who teaches in the Africana studies program at Tulane University in New Orleans, is being honored for her debut novel The Talented Ribkins, the story of an African American family whose members have unique superpowers.

Samuel Mukasa Is One of Three Finalists for Provost at the University of Connecticut

Samuel Mukasa Is One of Three Finalists for Provost at the University of Connecticut

Samuel B. Mukasa is dean of the College of Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota. From 2011 to 2016, Dr. Mukasa was dean of the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences at the University of New Hampshire.

Judge Orders Appointment of a "Special Master" to Resolve Maryland Desegregation Suit

Judge Orders Appointment of a “Special Master” to Resolve Maryland Desegregation Suit

A federal judge in Maryland has ordered both sides in the longstanding lawsuit over inequities in the state system of higher education to work harder to find a solution. She will appoint a special master to oversee the negotiations.

African Americans Underrepresented in College Athletic Leadership Posts

African Americans Underrepresented in College Athletic Leadership Posts

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida found that the academic and athletic administrations at the 130 colleges and universities that make up the NCAA’s Division I Football Bowl Subdivision are overwhelmingly White and male.

Edwidge Danticat Wins the Neustadt International Prize for Literature

Edwidge Danticat Wins the Neustadt International Prize for Literature

Edwidge Danticat, the Haitian-American writer who has taught creative writing at New York University and the University of Miami, was chosen to receive the $50,000 Neustadt Prize, which is awarded by the University of Oklahoma.

UCLA Study Documents the Low Representation of Black Writers in Television

UCLA Study Documents the Low Representation of Black Writers in Television

The reported authored by Darnell Hunt, dean of social sciences at UCLA, found that two-thirds of television shows had no Black writers at all, and another 17 percent of shows had just one Black writer.

Angela Amar Named Dean of the Nursing School at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Angela Amar Named Dean of the Nursing School at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Currently, Dr. Amar is the associate dean for undergraduate studies and chief diversity officer at the School of Nursing at Emory University in Atlanta. Earlier, she was an associate professor and director of the advanced forensic nursing program at Boston College.

In Memoriam: Mary Louise McKinney Edmonds, 1932-2017

In Memoriam: Mary Louise McKinney Edmonds, 1932-2017

Mary Edmonds was a faculty member at Cleveland State University, a dean at Bowling Green State University, and vice provost for student affairs at Stanford University.

A New Premed Curriculum That Includes Courses on Structural Racism

A New Premed Curriculum That Includes Courses on Structural Racism

Scholars at Vanderbilt University in Nashville have developed a new interdisciplinary curriculum for premed students that gives undergraduates an understanding of structural and institutional racism and how it can impact healthcare disparities.

University of Maryland Eastern Shore Enters Into Two Articulation Agreements

University of Maryland Eastern Shore Enters Into Two Articulation Agreements

One of these new partnerships is designed to increase the number of students who transfer to the university while the other will provide opportunities for university students to gain access to a graduate program.

Two African American Men Appointed to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Two African American Men Appointed to Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Luke Givens is the new director of multicultural affairs at the University of North Carolina at Asheville and Dan Bunch was appointed special assistant to the vice president for student affairs at Boston College.

Two HBCUs Post Record Numbers for Final Enrollment Figures

Two HBCUs Post Record Numbers for Final Enrollment Figures

At Alcorn State University in Mississippi, enrollments of first-year students are up 39 percent, reaching an all-time record. For the sixth time in the past eight years, Delaware State University has broken enrollment records. There are 4,648 students on campus this fall.

Winston-Salem State University Partners With a Medical School in China

Winston-Salem State University Partners With a Medical School in China

One part of the agreement calls for Hubei University to develop a free one or two-week training program in Chinese acupuncture or traditional Chinese medicine for WSSU undergraduates and graduate students.

Three African American Faculty Members Taking on New Roles

Three African American Faculty Members Taking on New Roles

Taking on new assignments in higher education are Mavis Sanders at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Keith Jenkins at the Rochester Institute of Technology and Nicole Hodges Persley at the University of Kansas.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Emory University Acquires the Archives of Playwright Douglas Turner Ward

Emory University Acquires the Archives of Playwright Douglas Turner Ward

In 1967, Douglas Turner Ward was the co-founder of the Negro Ensemble Company at the St. Mark’s Playhouse in New York City. Since its founding the Negro Ensemble Company has produced more than 200 new plays and provided a theatrical home for more than 4,000 cast and crew members.

Racial Slurs on a Car Near Kansas State University Were a Hoax

Racial Slurs on a Car Near Kansas State University Were a Hoax

Racial slurs were found scrawled on a car near the campus of Kansas State University. In addition to racial slurs, the phrases “go home,” “date your own kind,” Whites only,” and “die” were written on the car. It turns out that the Black man who owned the car wrote the slurs.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

In Memoriam: Jacqueline Bolden Beck, 1931-2017

In Memoriam: Jacqueline Bolden Beck, 1931-2017

Dr. Beck started her career at Florida A&M University in 1958 as an instructor of nursing. She retired in 2000 after serving as the leader of the School of Allied Health Sciences at the university for 18 years.

Larry Davis, Dean of the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh, to Step Down

Larry Davis, Dean of the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh, to Step Down

Larry E. Davis dean of the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh, has announced that he will step down as the end of the current academic year. He has led the School of Social work since 2001.

Student Expelled From the University of Hartford After Allegedly Harassing Black Roommate

Student Expelled From the University of Hartford After Allegedly Harassing Black Roommate

A White woman student at the University of Hartford in Connecticut was expelled from school and faces criminal charges after she posted on social media that she had done several things to intimidate her Black roommate.

The Eight HBCUs Participating in the 16th Annual Honda Battle of the Bands

The Eight HBCUs Participating in the 16th Annual Honda Battle of the Bands

The eight bands selected will receive an all-expenses paid trip to Atlanta. In addition, each school will receive a $20,000 grant to support their music education programs.

Wilma Mishoe Will Lead Delaware State University in Transition Period

Wilma Mishoe Will Lead Delaware State University in Transition Period

Dr. Mishoe, who now chairs the board of trustees at Delaware State, is the former dean of the Office of Instruction at Delaware Technical & Community College. Her father Luna Mishoe was the president of what is now Delaware State University from 1960 to 1987.

Study Finds a Persistent Racial Gap in Exposure to Air Pollution

Study Finds a Persistent Racial Gap in Exposure to Air Pollution

Air pollution has been reduced nationwide but remains high in predominantly Black neighborhoods. A new study concludes that if Blacks breathed the same air as White people with similar levels of nitrogen dioxide, about 5,000 premature deaths from heart disease would be avoided annually.

Is Merit-Based Financial Aid Detrimental to the Future of American Medicine?

Is Merit-Based Financial Aid Detrimental to the Future of American Medicine?

The number of students who graduate with no medical school debt has nearly doubled in the past five years. In contrast, the number of students who graduate with more than $300,000 in debt has also doubled.

Higher Income Blacks More Likely to Experience Racism and Discrimination

Higher Income Blacks More Likely to Experience Racism and Discrimination

African Americans who are climbing the socioeconomic ladder find themselves in more situations where they’re in the minority – whether that’s at school, work or in their neighborhood than is the case for lower-income African Americans.