Archive for September, 2017

Morgan State University Partners With Two Community Colleges

Morgan State University Partners With Two Community Colleges

Morgan State has entered into a partnership that will allow students who graduate with associate’s degrees from Prince George’s Community College and Howard Community College, to study for bachelor’s degrees in engineering or psychology at the Laurel College Center.

Act II for the Darrell Walker Art and Basketball Fundraiser at Clark Atlanta University

Act II for the Darrell Walker Art and Basketball Fundraiser at Clark Atlanta University

Coach Darrell Walker uses his contacts in the sports, entertainment, and arts fields to secure donations of artwork and memorabilia that are auctioned off to raise money to pay for summer school tuition and other academic services for the players on this team.

Honors and Awards for Five African Americans With Ties to Academia

Honors and Awards for Five African Americans With Ties to Academia

Those presented with awards or who received honors are Torina D. Lewis of Clark Atlanta University, Hank Aaron at the University of Notre Dame, Charles Ogletree of Harvard Law School, Thomas J. Freeman of Texas Southern University, and Wilma Harper Horne at Hampton University.

Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina, Debuts New Scholarship Program

Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina, Debuts New Scholarship Program

The scholarships will provide funds for tuition, fees and room and board for first-year students. The scholarships are renewable for three additional years provided the students maintain a 3.75 grade point average.

Six African Americans Appointed to New Administrative Positions in Higher Education

Six African Americans Appointed to New Administrative Positions in Higher Education

Taking on new duties are Teshia Roby at California State University, Fullerton, Lisa Wilson at Clark Atlanta University, Dowell Taylor at Jackson State University, Michelle Bryan at the University of South Carolina, Tami B. Simmons at Johnson C. Smith University, and Mose Harris IV at Fayetteville State University.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Julian Randall Selected to Receive the 2017 Cave Canem Award in Poetry

Julian Randall Selected to Receive the 2017 Cave Canem Award in Poetry

Julian Randall, a second-year student in the master of fine arts creative writing program at the University of Mississippi, has been selected as the winner of the 2017 Cave Canem Poetry Prize from the Brooklyn, New York-based Cave Canem Foundation.

A Historical Marker at the University of Alabama Honors Autherine Lucy Foster

A Historical Marker at the University of Alabama Honors Autherine Lucy Foster

After a three-year legal battle, in 1956 Autherine Lucy Foster enrolled in a graduate program in education at the University of Alabama. Angry protests by White students ensured. Foster was suspended three days later “for her own safety” and she was later expelled.

The University of Virginia Deals With a 1921 Pledge of $1,000 From the KKK

The University of Virginia Deals With a 1921 Pledge of $1,000 From the KKK

In a statement to the university community, Teresa A. Sullivan, president of the University of Virginia, stated that “we’re going to acknowledge the pledge, and we’re going do so in a way that would be as disagreeable as possible for any remnants of the KKK who may be watching.”

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

University of Virginia School of Medicine Honors an Early Black Graduate

University of Virginia School of Medicine Honors an Early Black Graduate

Dr. Vivian Pinn was the only woman and the only African American in the 1967 graduating class. She later served for 20 years as director of the Office for Research on Women’s Health at the National Institutes of Health. Now, the medical research building at the University of Virginia has been renamed in her honor.

College of Business Administration at Alabama State University Named for Former Dean

College of Business Administration at Alabama State University Named for Former Dean

Alabama State University has named its College of Business Administration to honor Percy J. Vaughn Jr. Dr. Vaughn was recruited to establish the College of Business Administration in 1975. He served as dean for 35 years until his retirement in 2010.

Harvard-Based Journal on Africa and the Diaspora Is Printed Once Again in Africa

Harvard-Based Journal on Africa and the Diaspora Is Printed Once Again in Africa

The journal Transition was founded in 1961 in Kampala, Uganda, and became an important voice of Black intellectual thought as the continent transitioned from colonial rule to independence. For the past quarter century, the journal has been housed at Harvard University.

New Black Faculty at the Arizona State University College of Law

New Black Faculty at the Arizona State University College of Law

The Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University has announced that there are nine new faculty members on campus this fall. Three of the nine new hires are African Americans: Angela Banks, Don Gibson, and Joshua Sellers.

Many Instances of Racial Hate on College Campuses

Many Instances of Racial Hate on College Campuses

It didn’t take long for racial hate to rear its ugly head on college campus this fall. Hate crimes have occurred on a number of campuses.

Study Examines the Racial Wage Gap for Faculty at Public Universities

Study Examines the Racial Wage Gap for Faculty at Public Universities

Black faculty earned lower salaries, on average, compared to White faculty — approximately $10,000 to $15,000 less per year. The authors found that wage gaps were largely due to three factors: amount of work experience, research productivity and field of expertise.

Two African Americans Named to Dean Positions at Alcorn State University

Two African Americans Named to Dean Positions at Alcorn State University

Edmund Buckner was named dean of the School of Agriculture and Applied Sciences at Alcorn State University in Mississippi. Donna Williams was appointed dean of the School of Business at the university.

Study Examines Voter Turnout Among African American College Students

Study Examines Voter Turnout Among African American College Students

The turnout rate for all African American college students declined by 5.3 percentage points in 2016 when compared to the 2012 rate. At historically Black colleges and universities the student voter turnout rate had a much steeper decline.

Racial Discrimination in Hiring Remains Entrenched

Racial Discrimination in Hiring Remains Entrenched

The authors examined 28 different studies representing 55,842 job applications submitted for 26,326 positions. They found that since 1989, Whites receive on average 36 percent more callbacks than African Americans and that this rate remained constant over the period.

The Large Racial Poverty Gap and Its Impact on Higher Education

The Large Racial Poverty Gap and Its Impact on Higher Education

The U.S. Census Bureau has released its annual report on poverty in the United States. The report shows that in 2016, 9,234,000 African Americans were living below the official poverty line in the United States. This was 22 percent of the entire Black population.

Record First-Year Enrollments at Tennessee State University in Nashville

Record First-Year Enrollments at Tennessee State University in Nashville

There are more than 1,500 students in this fall’s entering class. This is the largest first-year class in the university’s history and 17 percent more entering students than was the case a year ago. Increased enrollments have prompted a plan to build a new $75 million residential complex on campus.

New Duties in the Academic World for Eight Black Faculty Members

New Duties in the Academic World for Eight Black Faculty Members

Here is this week’s roundup of Black scholars who have been hired or assigned new duties at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Winston-Salem State University Offers a New Online Nursing Degree Program

Winston-Salem State University Offers a New Online Nursing Degree Program

According to the North Carolina Board of Nursing, only about 35 percent of North Carolina’s 106,000 licensed nurses have obtained a bachelor’s degree. Winston-Salem State University has announced a new competency-based online degree program to address this concern.

Darlene Clark Hine Receives Lifetime Achievement Award From the Southern Historical Association

Darlene Clark Hine Receives Lifetime Achievement Award From the Southern Historical Association

The John Hope Franklin Lifetime Achievement Award is given out every five years. The award committee stated that “we cannot conceive of a more deserving candidate. Hine’s career has been deeply active, productive, and consequential.”

Delaware State University Partners With Beihua University in China

Delaware State University Partners With Beihua University in China

Under the agreement students at Beihua University will complete three years of study in China. They will then come to Delaware State for one semester of intensive study of English. Upon completion, they will be eligible for admission to the master’s degree program in physics at Delaware State.

Five African Americans Taking on New Administrative Duties in Higher Education

Five African Americans Taking on New Administrative Duties in Higher Education

Appointed to new administrative posts are Suzanne C. Adair at Pennsylvania State University, Ryan Williams at Syracuse University, Shander Adams at Jackson State University, Joy Haywood Moore at Boston College, and Aleshia Hall-Campbell at the University of Mississippi.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Harvard Law School Honors Slaves Whose Labor Produced Wealth That Led to the School's Founding

Harvard Law School Honors Slaves Whose Labor Produced Wealth That Led to the School’s Founding

Harvard University recently dedicated a plaque in the Harvard Law School plaza to honor the slaves who created the wealth which enabled Isaac Royall Jr. to provide funds for the establishment of the law school in 1817. The Royall family generated wealth from the slave trade and the operation of a sugar plantation in Antigua.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

African American Quadruplets Enroll at Yale University

African American Quadruplets Enroll at Yale University

After fielding offers from a wide range of top colleges and universities, the Wade quadruplets of Liberty Township, Ohio, are all members of the Class of 2021 at Yale University.

Fallou Ngom Named Director of the African Studies Center at Boston University

Fallou Ngom Named Director of the African Studies Center at Boston University

Fallou Ngom, associate professor of anthropology, was named director of Boston University’s African Studies Center. The center was established in 1953. More than 90 Boston University faculty members are affiliated with the center.

Former College President Johnnetta Cole Taking on a New Assignment

Former College President Johnnetta Cole Taking on a New Assignment

Johnnetta B. Cole, president emerita of Spelman College in Atlanta and president emerita of Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina, has been named a senior consulting fellow at the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Natasha Trethewey Wins the $250,000 Heinz Award in Arts and Humanities

Natasha Trethewey Wins the $250,000 Heinz Award in Arts and Humanities

Natasha Trethewey, the Board of Trustees Professor of English at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, has been selected to receive the Heinz Award in the Arts and Humanities. The award comes with an unrestricted $250,000 prize. She will be honored in Pittsburgh on October 18.

Diversity in Friendships at School Can Lead to Greater Academic Success

Diversity in Friendships at School Can Lead to Greater Academic Success

A new study by scholars at the University of California, Davis finds that early adolescents’ grades were higher when they socialized with peers from other ethnicities. Researchers examined the lunch companions of 800 sixth grade students in three states and examined differences in their grades.