Archive for April, 2017

Five Black Women Faculty Members Taking on New Assignments

Five Black Women Faculty Members Taking on New Assignments

They are: Reighan A. Gillam at the University of Southern California, Barbara D. Savage of the University of Pennsylvania, Todne Thomas at Harvard University, Sandra Crewe of Howard University, and Kyla Day Fletcher of Kalamazoo College.

Kentucky State University Establishes the Institute for Lifelong Learning

Kentucky State University Establishes the Institute for Lifelong Learning

Offerings will include credit-bearing courses for teachers and social workers who want to enhance their professional development skills and credentials. But there will also be many noncredit courses in subject areas such as wine tasting, belly dancing, and English as a second language.

Ohio State's James Moore III Honored by the American Educational Research Association

Ohio State’s James Moore III Honored by the American Educational Research Association

Dr. Moore has been selected to receive the Scholars of Color Mid-Career Contribution Award and the Dr. Carlos J. Vallejo Memorial Award for Lifetime Scholarship from AERA’s Multicultural/Multiethnic Education Special Interest Group.

Florida A&M University Designated a Leader in Cyber Defense Education

Florida A&M University Designated a Leader in Cyber Defense Education

Florida A&M University, the historically Black educational institution in Tallahassee, was recently designated by the National Security Agency and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education.

New Administrative Posts for Five African Americans in Higher Education

New Administrative Posts for Five African Americans in Higher Education

Appointed to new positions are Patricia Pratt-Cook at St. Catherine University in Minnesota, Jasmin Spain at Pitt Community College in North Carolina, Amber Williams at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Martin Jarmond at Boston College, and Keyonda M. Smith at the Maryland University of Integrated Health.

Fayetteville State University to Offer a New Online Degree Program in Accounting

Fayetteville State University to Offer a New Online Degree Program in Accounting

Fayetteville State University, the historically Black educational institution in North Carolina, has announced that it is adding a new bachelor’s degree program in accounting. It will be the only public university in the state of North Carolina to offer an online bachelor’s degree program in accounting.

Eight African Americans Named Truman Scholars

Eight African Americans Named Truman Scholars

While the Truman Foundation does not release data on the racial and ethnic make up of their scholars, an analysis of this year’s class of 62 Truman Scholars, concludes that it appears that eight are African Americans.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

New Campaign Seeks to Curtail Tobacco Use on HBCU Campuses

New Campaign Seeks to Curtail Tobacco Use on HBCU Campuses

The CVS Health Foundation has joined forces with the anti-tobacco organization the Truth Initiative to help make the nation’s historically Black colleges and universities tobacco-free. According to the foundation, less than half of the nation’s HBCUs have smoke-free or tobacco-free policies.

First Black Woman Student at the University of Georgia Creates 'Giving Voice to the Voiceless' Fund

First Black Woman Student at the University of Georgia Creates ‘Giving Voice to the Voiceless’ Fund

Charlayne Hunter-Gault and her husband Ron Gault have created the Giving Voice to the Voiceless endowment at the University of Georgia. The endowment will provide grants to university students to promote social justice and global understanding.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

DoVeanna Fulton Is a Finalist for Provost at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock

DoVeanna Fulton Is a Finalist for Provost at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Currently, DoVeanna S. Fulton is dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Houston-Downtown.

Black Students and Faculty at North American Theological Schools

Black Students and Faculty at North American Theological Schools

Blacks make up 12.6 percent of all students at the 270 member institutions of the Association of Theological Schools. But Blacks are only 7.7 percent of the faculties at these schools.

University of Virginia Names a Campus Building in Honor of a Slave

University of Virginia Names a Campus Building in Honor of a Slave

Peyton Skipwith, a former slave who quarried stone for some of the early structures on the Charlottesville campus, was owned by John Hartwell Cocke, one of the first members of the university’s board of visitors.

Princeton University Recognizes Two Black Scholars by Naming Facilities in Their Honor

Princeton University Recognizes Two Black Scholars by Naming Facilities in Their Honor

Princeton University in New Jersey has announced that West College, one of the oldest buildings on campus, will be renamed to honor professor emerita Toni Morrison. And an auditorium will be renamed to honor professor emeritus Sir Arthur Lewis. Both scholars are Nobel Prize winners.

UCLA Study Questions the Strategy of Public Health Officials in Fighting HIV/AIDS in Africa

UCLA Study Questions the Strategy of Public Health Officials in Fighting HIV/AIDS in Africa

Public health officials in Africa have set a goal to diagnose 90 percent of the HIV cases and to treat 90 percent of those diagnosed by the year 2020. But an analysis by researchers at the Center for Biomedical Modeling at UCLA concludes that this strategy won’t work.

University of New Hampshire Study Finds Persisting Racial Gap in Child Poverty

University of New Hampshire Study Finds Persisting Racial Gap in Child Poverty

More than one third of all African American children continue to live in poverty. In 2015, 36.5 percent of all Black children lived in families below the poverty line. This is more than three times the rate for non-Hispanic White children.

Alumnus Gregory Vincent Named President of Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Alumnus Gregory Vincent Named President of Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Currently, Dr. Vincent is the W.K. Kellogg Professor of Community College Leadership, professor of law, and vice president for diversity and community engagement at the University of Texas at Austin. He joined the faculty at the University of Texas in 2005.

Academic Hunger Games: HBCUs in a Fight for Survival

Academic Hunger Games: HBCUs in a Fight for Survival

John M. Rudley, president emeritus of Texas Southern University in Houston, examines the current leadership crisis that is impacting many of the nation’s historically Black colleges and universities.

The Next Dean of the School of Engineering at Rice University in Houston, Texas

The Next Dean of the School of Engineering at Rice University in Houston, Texas

Currently, Dr. Reginald DesRoches is the chair of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. A native of Haiti, he joined the faculty at Georgia Tech in 1998 and was promoted to full professor in 2008.

Rachel Lindsey Appointed to Lead Chicago State University

Rachel Lindsey Appointed to Lead Chicago State University

Dr. Lindsey has served as a professor of psychology and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Chicago State University. Earlier in her career, she taught at Northeastern Illinois University and Loyola University of Chicago.

In Memoriam: Milton A. Gordon, 1935-2017

In Memoriam: Milton A. Gordon, 1935-2017

Dr. Gordon was named president of California State University in 1990. During his 22-year tenure, enrollments increased from 25,600 to more than 36,000. Thirteen new academic programs were established and 22 building were constructed on campus.

Paine College in Augusta, Georgia, Names Jerry Hardee as Its Next President

Paine College in Augusta, Georgia, Names Jerry Hardee as Its Next President

Jerry L. Hardee is the former assistant to the president for equal opportunity programs and multicultural affairs at Valdosta State University in Georgia. He will take office on July 1.

Finances Force Savannah State University to Drop Out of the NCAA's Division I

Finances Force Savannah State University to Drop Out of the NCAA’s Division I

Cheryl D. Dozier, president of Savannah State University, issued a statement that read in part: “While I am extremely proud of the progress our athletes and coaches have made at the Division I Level, it is not financially feasible for us to continue.”

Michigan State University Historian Wins Prestigious Book Award

Michigan State University Historian Wins Prestigious Book Award

LaShawn D. Harris, an assistant professor of history at Michigan State University, has been chosen to receive the 2017 Darlene Clark Hine Award from the Organization of American Historians. The award is given annually to the author of the best book of the year on African American women’s and gender history.

Central State University Offers New Scholarship for STEM Majors

Central State University Offers New Scholarship for STEM Majors

The Broadening Ohio’s Workforce in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics-Agriculture scholarship offers a renewable $10,000 scholarship for first-year students and community college transfers. To be eligible, students must be Ohio residents and have had a minimum 3.0 grade point average in high school or community college.

Two African American Men Appointed to Administrative Posts at State Universities

Two African American Men Appointed to Administrative Posts at State Universities

Nicholas Love was named director of the Social Media Strategy Hub at North Carolina State University in Raleigh and Stacy Danley is the new director of athletics at South Carolina State University in Orangeburg.

University of Maryland Eastern Shore Takes Recruitment on the Road

University of Maryland Eastern Shore Takes Recruitment on the Road

The customized Mercedes-Benz van is equipped with a satellite television system, wireless internet, and computer stations. The van can seat up to nine people including a four-seat lounge where recruiters can talk face to face with prospective students.

University of Notre Dame Scholar Named a Henry Luce III Fellow in Theology

University of Notre Dame Scholar Named a Henry Luce III Fellow in Theology

Emmanuel Katongole, an associate professor of theology and peace studies at Notre Dame, will spend a year in sub-Saharan African conducting research on ethnic, religious, and ecological violence. The fellows program is administered by the Association of Theological Schools and funded by the Henry Luce Foundation.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

University of Michigan Seeks to Identify All of Its Early Black Students

University of Michigan Seeks to Identify All of Its Early Black Students

Early records of the university did not include information on a student’s race. By using yearbooks, class photos, and student newspapers, researchers have identified more than 1,700 Black students who attended the university from 1853 to 1970.

Rutgers University Scholars Resurrect an Old Literary Magazine for Today's Generation

Rutgers University Scholars Resurrect an Old Literary Magazine for Today’s Generation

From 1966 to 1983, the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore published the literary magazine Chicory. The publication, financed by the federal Office of Economic Opportunity, contained poetry, prose, and artwork composed by members of Baltimore’s low-income, African American communities.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

The Growing Racial Gap in Home Ownership

The Growing Racial Gap in Home Ownership

Many American families use the equity in their home to finance the higher education of their children or grandchildren. Since this source of wealth is less available to Black families, this places African Americans at a disadvantage in financing higher education.