Archive for December, 2016

A Quartet of African Americans in New Administrative Positions at State Universities

A Quartet of African Americans in New Administrative Positions at State Universities

Taking on new assignments are Wanda Ford at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, Dwayne Pinkney at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Paul Bryant at Grambling State University in Louisiana, and Angela Clements st Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Biology Scholars Program at Cornell University Propels Black Students to Graduate School

Biology Scholars Program at Cornell University Propels Black Students to Graduate School

Since 2010 there have been 120 Biology Scholars who have graduated from the university. More than 90 percent of those who applied to medical school were accepted and enrolled. Another 19 students are enrolled in Ph.D. programs and three are enrolled in M.D./Ph.D. programs.

Yale's Jackson Institute Offers New Fellowships for African Students

Yale’s Jackson Institute Offers New Fellowships for African Students

The Jackson Institute currently enrolls about 25 students in its master’s degree program in global affairs. About half of these students are from outside the United States. Two new fellowships will be available for African students or others who have shown an interest in studying Africa.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

A New Postdoctoral Fellows Program Aims to Increase Diversity in Academia

A New Postdoctoral Fellows Program Aims to Increase Diversity in Academia

The university’s Academic Pathways Postdoctoral Fellowship will emphasize academic research and scholarship, but will also include enhanced professional and leadership development training and robust mentoring.

University of Michigan Program Offers Research Opportunities for African Scholars

University of Michigan Program Offers Research Opportunities for African Scholars

The University of Michigan’s African Presidential Scholars program brings early-career faculty from African universities to Ann Arbor, Michigan, for a period of four to six months. This fall, there are 12 African scholars on campus.

Confederate Monument Moved From the Edge of the University of Louisville Campus

Confederate Monument Moved From the Edge of the University of Louisville Campus

A monument honoring Confederate soldiers who died in the Civil War, was moved from the edge of the campus of the University of Louisville in Kentucky. The University of Louisville Foundation paid $350,000 of the $400,000 cost to move the monument.

Three Scholars Honored for Their Kentucky African American Encyclopedia

Three Scholars Honored for Their Kentucky African American Encyclopedia

There are more than 1,000 entries in the encyclopedia detailing African American history from frontier days to the present time. More than 150 scholars contributed to the entries in the volume.

Racial Differences in Food and Housing Insecurity Among Community College Students

Racial Differences in Food and Housing Insecurity Among Community College Students

The data from a study conducted at San Diego State University showed that among community college students 48.4 percent of Black men and 41.1 percent of Black women expressed housing insecurity. Black men also had a very high level of food insecurity.

The Progress of the Ivy League in Admitting Black Students

The Progress of the Ivy League in Admitting Black Students

A decade ago, there were 1,110 Black students in the entering classes at the eight Ivy League schools. In 2016, there are 1,503, a 35 percent increase. Four of the eight Ivy League schools have an entering class that is more than 11 percent Black. A decade ago, the leader stood at 9.6 percent.

The New President of Payne Theological Seminary in Wilberforce, Ohio

The New President of Payne Theological Seminary in Wilberforce, Ohio

Since 2015, Dr. Michael Joseph Brown has been serving as academic dean and interim president at the seminary. Previously, he was an associate professor of New Testament and Christian origins at Emory University in Atlanta.

University of New Hampshire Research Shows the Downward Trend in the White Population

University of New Hampshire Research Shows the Downward Trend in the White Population

A new study by researchers at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire finds that in 17 U.S. states the number of Whites who died in 2014 was higher than the number of Whites born in these states.

An Increase in Scholars From Sub-Saharan Nations Teaching at U.S. Colleges and Universities

An Increase in Scholars From Sub-Saharan Nations Teaching at U.S. Colleges and Universities

In the 2014-15 academic year, there were 1,989 scholars from sub-Saharan African nations teaching at U.S. colleges and universities. This is up nearly 8 percent after a 13 percent decline the previous year.

University Study Examines Differences in Cancer Mortality Among Blacks

University Study Examines Differences in Cancer Mortality Among Blacks

The research, conducted by scientists at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, found that among all major racial/ethnic groups in the United States, American-born Blacks had the highest rate of cancer mortality. Caribbean-born Blacks in the United States had the lowest rate.

Bowie State University Study Examines the History of Lynchings in Maryland

Bowie State University Study Examines the History of Lynchings in Maryland

The study documented 40 lynchings in the state during the period from 1854 to 1933. The research was conducted by Nicholas M. Creary and two students. Dr. Creary is an assistant professor of history and government at Bowie State.

Cornelius Carter Appointed to an Endowed Chair at the University of Alabama

Cornelius Carter Appointed to an Endowed Chair at the University of Alabama

Professor Carter, who holds a a master of fine arts degree in dance from the University of Hawaii at Manoa, also serves as director of the dance program at the University of Alabama and as artistic director of the Alabama Repertory Dance Theatre.

New Coach at Clark Atlanta University Ranks Academics Ahead of Basketball

New Coach at Clark Atlanta University Ranks Academics Ahead of Basketball

Darrell Walker, former NBA world champion and former head coach of two NBA teams, was hired as the head men’s basketball coach at Clark Atlanta University this past spring. Recently, he held a fundraiser to raise money so his players could go to summer school for free.

Honors for Two African American Women Scholars

Honors for Two African American Women Scholars

Goulda A. Downer, an assistant professor in the College of Medicine at Howard University in Washington, D.C., was honored by the Institute of Caribbean Studies and Alcorn State University has renamed its Fine Arts Building to honor long-time faculty member Joyce J. Bolden.

New Center for Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers Opens at Alcorn State University

New Center for Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers Opens at Alcorn State University

The Center’s mission is to make policy recommendations that will improve the success of socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers by implementing a transparent management structure that focuses on research, stakeholder engagement and outreach.

The New Chief Diversity Officer at Empire State College in New York

The New Chief Diversity Officer at Empire State College in New York

Elliott Dawes has been named the inaugural chief diversity officer for institutional equity and inclusion at Empire State College in Saratoga Springs, New York, a campus of the State University of New York System. He will be based in the college’s New York City offices.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.