Archive for April, 2016

Howard University Issues Tuition Rebates to Students Who Graduated Within Four Years

Howard University Issues Tuition Rebates to Students Who Graduated Within Four Years

Howard University, the historically Black research university in Washington, D.C., has issued a 50 percent rebate on the last semester’s tuition for students who completed their degrees in the traditional four-year time frame.

Four Blacks Scholars Appointed to Endowed Professorships

Four Blacks Scholars Appointed to Endowed Professorships

The appointees are Corey O. Montgomery at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, James. R. Martin at Clemson University in South Carolina, Pierre Saint-Armand at Yale University, and Stephanie R. Yates at the University of Alabama Birmingham.

New Student Center Planned on the Campus of North Carolina Central University

New Student Center Planned on the Campus of North Carolina Central University

A new 100,230-square-foot student center for North Carolina Central University in Durham has been approved by the board of governors of the University of North Carolina. The existing student center was constructed 50 years ago and is the oldest in the university system.

A Tribute to the First African American Woman Graduate of the Yale School of Music

A Tribute to the First African American Woman Graduate of the Yale School of Music

Helen Eugenia Hagan was an accomplished concert pianist, composer, and educator who graduated from the Yale School of Music in 1912. She is buried in an unmarked grave in New Haven’s Evergreen Cemetery. That is about to change.

Spelman College Establishes a Curatorial Studies Program

Spelman College Establishes a Curatorial Studies Program

A recent survey found that only 4 percent of museum professionals are African Americans. This new program, said to be the first of its kind at a historically Black college or university, seeks to address the diversity gap in museum leadership.

New Administrative Duties for Four African Americans in Higher Education

New Administrative Duties for Four African Americans in Higher Education

Taking on new administrative duties are Kristene Kelly at Keene State College in New Hampshire, Michael A. Hales at Delaware State University, James Hill at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and Chanta M. Haywood at Fort Valley State University in Georgia.

A New Ph.D. Program in African American Preaching and Sacred Rhetoric

A New Ph.D. Program in African American Preaching and Sacred Rhetoric

The new Ph.D. program at the Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis will focus on the special role that preaching has in the African American community, viewing it as an art form, a force for social change, and an area overdue for academic study.

University of Louisville Creates an Online Archive of a Civil Rights Era Incident

University of Louisville Creates an Online Archive of a Civil Rights Era Incident

In 1954, African Americans Andrew and Charlotte Wade bought a new suburban house in an all-White neighborhood. Segregationists used dynamite to blow up the couple’s home.

Tavis Smiley Gives Back to His Alma Mater

Tavis Smiley Gives Back to His Alma Mater

The author and television and radio broadcaster has established a new scholarship at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs that will be earmarked for African Americans with preference given to those who are the first in their family to attend college.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

From time to time, The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Clemson University Recognizes Its Ties to Slavery With Historical Markers

Clemson University Recognizes Its Ties to Slavery With Historical Markers

Clemson University in South Carolina was built on land that formerly was the Fort Hill Plantation of John B. Calhoun, who served as vice president of the United States under John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson.

Dixie State University in Utah Debuts a New Mascot

Dixie State University in Utah Debuts a New Mascot

Dixie State University in Utah used to have a Rebel as its mascot and then changed the names of its athletic teams to the Red Storm. Now the university’s teams will be known as the Trailblazers and its mascot will be Brooks the Bison.

Jesse Lutabingwa Is a Finalist for an Administrative Post at the University of Nebraska

Jesse Lutabingwa Is a Finalist for an Administrative Post at the University of Nebraska

Jesse Lutabingwa, a native of Tanzania, is associate vice chancellor for international education and development and a profeessor of public administration at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina.

Three Black Scholars Named to Dean Positions

Three Black Scholars Named to Dean Positions

Deborah Deas will be the new dean of the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine. Onye Ozuzu was named dean of the School of Fine and Performing Arts at Columbia College in Chicago and Arlie Petters was named dean of academic affairs at Trinity College of Duke University.

The New President of Virginia University of Lynchburg

The New President of Virginia University of Lynchburg

Kathy C. Franklin was named the 18th president of what is now Virginia University of Lynchburg. Founded in 1886, the educational institution’s original name was the Lynchburg Baptist Seminary. Dr. Franklin has been interim president since last October and earlier was provost at the university.

The Racial Gap in Reading and Mathematics Can Be Eliminated With Quality Pre-K Programs

The Racial Gap in Reading and Mathematics Can Be Eliminated With Quality Pre-K Programs

If the success of universal Pre-K programs in Oklahoma and Massachusetts was replicated nationwide, the gap in mathematical achievement for African American children would be reduced by 45 percent and the gap in reading achievement would be eliminated.

Craig Boise Named the Next Dean of the College of Law at Syracuse University

Craig Boise Named the Next Dean of the College of Law at Syracuse University

Since 2011, Professor Boise has been serving as dean of the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law at Cleveland State University in Ohio. Earlier, he served on the law school faculty at DePaul University in Chicago and Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.

Racial Bias May Contribute to the Undertreatment of Pain for African Americans

Racial Bias May Contribute to the Undertreatment of Pain for African Americans

Past studies have demonstrated that Black patients tended to be undertreated for pain relative to White patients. A new study by researchers at the University of Virginia has found that this undertreatment may be caused, in part, by racial bias.

Claude Steele Stepping Down From Provost Position at the University of California, Berkeley

Claude Steele Stepping Down From Provost Position at the University of California, Berkeley

Claude Steele was appointed executive vice chancellor and provost at the University of California, Berkeley in 2014. He is stepping aside to deal with the health problems of his wife. He will remain at Berkeley as a professor of psychology.

University Study Explores the Views of Ferguson Protestors

University Study Explores the Views of Ferguson Protestors

Jennifer E. Cobbina, an associate professor at Michigan State University, led a study which included a series of in-depth interviews with people who participated in protests following the shooting of Michael Brown by a White police officer in Ferguson, Missouri.

Ranking the Best HBCUs: Did Money and Essence Get It Right?

Ranking the Best HBCUs: Did Money and Essence Get It Right?

The magazines Money and Essence recently collaborated on a project to determine the best historically Black colleges and universities. But any ratings initiative depends on the criteria selected to choose “the best.”

New Roles for Three Black Faculty Members

New Roles for Three Black Faculty Members

Taja-Nia Y. Henderson was promoted to full professor of law at the Rutgers University School of Law. Stefan Malone Cooper Jr. was named a research assistant professor at Hampton University and Gena Bardwell was named interim director of the the General Education Program at Touro College.

Central State University in Ohio to Become More Affordable to Out-of-State Students

Central State University in Ohio to Become More Affordable to Out-of-State Students

For the current academic year, out-of-state tuition was just under $14,000. For students from Ohio, tuition was $6,246. Under the new tuition formula, the out-of-state surcharge will be reduced by 76 percent for most students entering this coming fall.

Three African American Men in Higher Education Receive Prestigious Awards

Three African American Men in Higher Education Receive Prestigious Awards

The honorees are Walter Kimbrough, president of Dillard University in New Orleans, Joseph A. Johnson III, a retired professor of physics at Florida A&M University, and Isiah Warner, a professor of chemistry at Louisiana State University.

Morehouse School of Medicine to Create a Heart Disease Registry for African Americans

Morehouse School of Medicine to Create a Heart Disease Registry for African Americans

The new registry will import data directly from electronic health records enabling researchers to track trends and develop effective treatments for African American cardiovascular disease patients.

Three African American Women Named to University Administrative Posts

Three African American Women Named to University Administrative Posts

Taking on new assignments are Patricia Green-Powell at Florida A&M University, Pamela Mosely Gresham at Delaware State University, and Angela Winfield at Cornell University in New York.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

From time to time, The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Online Interactive Map Charts the Spread of Slavery in the United States

Online Interactive Map Charts the Spread of Slavery in the United States

Using U.S. Census data from 1790 to 1860, Lincoln Mullen of George Mason University created a map which shows how many slaves there were in each county in the United States at the time. Users can click on any county for the specifics of the particular county.

In Memoriam: Crawford Joseph Mims, 1922-2016

In Memoriam: Crawford Joseph Mims, 1922-2016

During his long career in higher education, Dr. Sims taught at Rust College, Shorter College, and Philander Smith College. He was provost at Philander Smith College and on three occasions served as interim president of the historically Black educational institution.

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Washington and Lee University Recognizes Its Ties to Slavery

Washington and Lee University Recognizes Its Ties to Slavery

In 1826, a local landowner bequeathed 84 slaves to what was then Washington College. For at least 30 years the college owned slaves. Recently, a historical marker was unveiled on campus listing the names of all the slaves that were owned by the college.

The First Portrait of a Person of Color in Harvard's Faculty Room

The First Portrait of a Person of Color in Harvard’s Faculty Room

Peter J. Gomes was pastor of Memorial Church at Harvard University for more than 40 years before his death in 2011. Among the nearly 40 notable figures from Harvard’s past whose portraits now hang in the Faculty Room, Gomes is the first person of color among the esteemed group.

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Orlando Patterson Honored for Lifetime Achievement by the Cleveland Foundation

Orlando Patterson Honored for Lifetime Achievement by the Cleveland Foundation

Orlando Patterson, the John Cowles Professor of Sociology at Harvard University, will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award as part of the Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards that will be presented this September in Cleveland.