Archive for December, 2014

A New Degree Program at North Carolina Central University

A New Degree Program at North Carolina Central University

North Carolina Central University, the historically Black educational institution in Durham, has announced that it will offer a new bachelor’s degree program in environmental and geographic sciences in its College of Arts and Sciences.

The New Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Jackson State University

The New Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Jackson State University

Mario Azevedo, a native of Mozambique, has been serving as professor and interim chair of the department of history and philosophy at the university. Previously, he taught for 20 years at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte.

Norfolk State University Partners With Several South African Educational Institutions

Norfolk State University Partners With Several South African Educational Institutions

The new Friends of South Africa is a consortium of educational institutions whose aim is to increase cooperation between Norfolk State and several South African universities.

Kentucky State Is a Partner in a New Academic Center on Intelligence

Kentucky State Is a Partner in a New Academic Center on Intelligence

Historically Black Kentucky State University has entered into a partnership with Morehead State University and Eastern Kentucky University to form the Bluegrass State Intelligence Community Center of Academic Excellence.

Four African Americans in New Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Four African Americans in New Administrative Posts in Higher Education

The appointees are Mary E. Coleman at Guttman Community College, Nelson Townsend at Florida A&M University, Sandra Jowers at the University of the District of Columbia and Tricia Penniecook at Oakwood University.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

From time to time, The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

Still need some suggestions for your holiday shopping list? Some of these new books might fit the bill.

Five African Americans Named Rhodes Scholars

Five African Americans Named Rhodes Scholars

The Rhodes Trust has announced the latest class of 32 American students who will study at the University of Oxford as Rhodes Scholars. It appears that five of the new Rhodes Scholars are African Americans.

University Librarian Honored by the Tuskegee Airmen

University Librarian Honored by the Tuskegee Airmen

Ruth M. Jackson, University Librarian Emerita at the University of California, Riverside, received the 2014 Presidential Recognition Award from Tuskegee Airmen Inc. In 2005, Jackson established the Tuskegee Airman Archive at the university.

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Why Do African Americans Avoid Engineering Degree Programs?

Why Do African Americans Avoid Engineering Degree Programs?

Although African Americans may be academically well-prepared for an engineering curriculum various factors may contribute to the feeling of “not fitting in” or a “lack of belonging.” A new study seeks to identify factors that produce such concerns and to recommend ways to eliminate them.

An Accelerated Master of Social Work Program at North Carolina Central University

An Accelerated Master of Social Work Program at North Carolina Central University

The program is offered to students who have earned a bachelor’s degree in social work from a college or university accredited by the Council of Social Work Education and who had a grade point average of at least 3.25 in their social work classes.

Mary Baldwin College Seeks to Increase Black Women in STEM Fields

Mary Baldwin College Seeks to Increase Black Women in STEM Fields

The Advance Achievement for Minority Women in STEM will provide scholarships, research opportunities, and travel expenses for Black and other minority women so they can attend professional conferences and seminars.

The Racial Gap in Doctoral Degree Awards

The Racial Gap in Doctoral Degree Awards

In 2013, African Americans earned 6.4 percent of all doctoral degrees awarded to U.S. students. Therefore, African Americans earned about one half the number of doctorates that would be the case if racial parity with the Black population prevailed.

Addressing the Lack of Racial Diversity in Environmental Science

Addressing the Lack of Racial Diversity in Environmental Science

Environmental and earth sciences have among the largest racial shortfalls in faculty positions in higher education. Minorities make up only 11 percent of the total faculty in environmental sciences.

Two African Americans Win Marshall Scholarships

Two African Americans Win Marshall Scholarships

Ashton Richardson is a graduate of Auburn University and is currently enrolled in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University. Tayler Ulmer is a senior at Spelman College in Atlanta.

Strategies for Increasing the Number of Black Students in STEM Fields

Strategies for Increasing the Number of Black Students in STEM Fields

Andrew C. Campbell, a professor of biology at Brown University, took 50 minority students from 15 different colleges and universities on a retreat and asked them for ideas to address the shortfall of Black and other minority students in STEM disciplines.

Duke Scholar Wins Grawemeyer Award in Religion

Duke Scholar Wins Grawemeyer Award in Religion

Willie James Jennings is an associate professor of theology and Black church studies at Duke University Divinity School. The Grawemeyer Award includes a $100,000 prize.

Center for African American Research and Policy Examines "Intersectionality"

Center for African American Research and Policy Examines “Intersectionality”

The Journal of Progressive Policy & Practice, recently released a special issue on intersectionality titled, “Informing Higher Education Policy & Practice Through Intersectionality.”

Spelman College "Suspends" the Cosby Endowed Professorship

Spelman College “Suspends” the Cosby Endowed Professorship

On the heels of accusations of rape by nearly 20 women against Bill Cosby, Spelman College, a highly rated liberal arts educational institution for African American women in Atlanta, has removed the Cosby name from an endowed professorship.

Gary Clark to Direct New Center for Law and Public Interest at Dillard University

Gary Clark to Direct New Center for Law and Public Interest at Dillard University

Gary Clark, an associate professor and chair of the department of political science at Dillard, has been named the inaugural director of the new center that will will focus on pre-law training for students interested in the legal profession.

Norfolk State University Placed on Probation by Accrediting Agency

Norfolk State University Placed on Probation by Accrediting Agency

Norfolk State will have 12 months to reassure the accrediting agency that it has corrected its problems. Next December, the agency could extend the probation for a year, restore the university to good standing, or revoke accreditation.

Four African Americans in New Teaching Roles

Four African Americans in New Teaching Roles

Those with new teaching posts are Denise W. Streeter at Pennsylvania State University, Dereck Barr at the University of Wisconsin, Delaney Bennett at Clemson University, and Clarence G. Newsome at the University of Cincinnati.

Kentucky State University Embarks on Its First Doctoral Degree Program

Kentucky State University Embarks on Its First Doctoral Degree Program

Beginning in January, historically Black Kentucky State University will offer an online doctoral program in nursing practice. The program will require more than 1,000 hours of clinical work with a nurse practitioner mentor.

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for Three African Americans

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for Three African Americans

The new appointees are Cinda Scott at the Center for Tropical Island Biodiversity Studies, Clyde Doughty Jr. at Bowie State University, and Mandara Savage at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale.

A Life Line for South Carolina State University

A Life Line for South Carolina State University

South Carolina State University has received approval from the state’s Bond Review Committee for a $12 million loan that will be paid out over three years. But the university’s president states that more challenges lay ahead.

In Memoriam: Abbie Simmons Grayson, 1904-2014

In Memoriam: Abbie Simmons Grayson, 1904-2014

At the time of her death, Abbie Simmons Grayson was not only the oldest alumna of Tuskegee University, but she was the oldest person in the state of Alabama.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

From time to time, The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

Still need some suggestions for your holiday shopping list? Some of these new books might fit the bill.

Miami Heat's Dwayne Wade Funds Literacy Program at Marquette University

Miami Heat’s Dwayne Wade Funds Literacy Program at Marquette University

Dwayne Wade, who played his college basketball at Marquette, has pledged to donate $195,000 over three years through his Wade’s World Foundation to support a program to reduce the racial literacy gap among inner-city children.

Study to Determine Best Practices to Combat Illiteracy in Rwanda

Study to Determine Best Practices to Combat Illiteracy in Rwanda

The Stanford University researchers have finished the first phase of what is a planned five-year project. Over the next few years, the research will assess interventions aimed at improving literacy to determine what is most effective.

University of Iowa's Charles Green Is Stepping Down

University of Iowa’s Charles Green Is Stepping Down

Charles Green, director of public safety at the University of Iowa, has announced that he will retire on January 9, 2015. Green has been on the staff at the university for 29 years and has served in his current post for two decades.

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Record Student Diversity at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Record Student Diversity at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

There are now 1,869 African Americans enrolled at SIUE. This is the highest number in university history. Blacks make up 13.4 percent of the student body.

Artist Uses Her Head to Win Top Prize in Art Competition

Artist Uses Her Head to Win Top Prize in Art Competition

Sonya Clark, chair of the department of craft and material studies at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, enlisted 12 hairstylists to craft her head into a work of art for the judges’ consideration.

A New Master's Degree Program at Virginia Union University

A New Master’s Degree Program at Virginia Union University

Virginia Union University in Richmond has announced that it will be offering a new master’s degree in curriculum and instruction. It is the first graduate program at the university offered outside the university’s School of Theology.