Archive for September, 2014

Paine College President Submits His Resignation

Paine College President Submits His Resignation

George C. Bradley has resigned as president of historically Black Paine College in Augusta, Georgia. This past June, the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools placed Paine College on accreditation probation.

Black Couples in Committed Relationships Are Healthier, Regardless of Marital Status

Black Couples in Committed Relationships Are Healthier, Regardless of Marital Status

A study conducted at the University of Georgia finds that Black couples in committed relationships – regardless of marital status – are healthier than other African Americans. But Blacks who had a committed partner of another race were not healthier than single African Americans.

Spelman College Enters Dual Degree Program With Emory University's School of Nursing

Spelman College Enters Dual Degree Program With Emory University’s School of Nursing

Under the program, students will spend their first three years at Spelman College. They will then spend two years at Emory completing their training and will graduate with a bachelor of arts degree and a bachelor’s of science degree in nursing.

Jackson State University Names a Recital Hall to Honor Long-Time Music Professor

Jackson State University Names a Recital Hall to Honor Long-Time Music Professor

Jimmie James served on the staff at Jackson State University in Mississippi for 43 years, rising through the ranks to chair the department of music. The university honored his service by placing his name on a recital hall in the campus music center.

North Carolina Central University to Offer New Degree in Computer Science and Business

North Carolina Central University to Offer New Degree in Computer Science and Business

The new interdisciplinary bachelor’s degree program in computer science and business at the historically Black university in Durham will be jointly administered by the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Business.

New Teaching Posts for Six African American Scholars

New Teaching Posts for Six African American Scholars

The appointees are Christena Cleveland at Bethel University, Jacquelyn Taylor at Yale, Andrea Washington-Brown at West Virginia University, Blanche Cooke at Wayne State, Eric L. De Barros at Clark University, and Emmett D. Carson at Indiana University.

Johnson C. Smith University's New Book Examines the History of Its Surrounding Neighborhood

Johnson C. Smith University’s New Book Examines the History of Its Surrounding Neighborhood

The anthology, entitled Let There Be Light, explores how the historic West End neighborhood of Charlotte, North Carolina, where the historically Black university is located, has helped shape racial relations of the New South.

Three African American Women in New Administrative Posts at Universities

Three African American Women in New Administrative Posts at Universities

The African American women taking on new roles are Marjolie Leonard at Stony Brook University in New York, Jamina Scippio-McFadden at the University of Massachusetts, and Jacqueline Hightower at Florida A&M University.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

From time to time, The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. Here are the latest selections.

Princeton University Aims to Make the Campus More Welcoming to Low-Income Students

Princeton University Aims to Make the Campus More Welcoming to Low-Income Students

A working group on undergraduate socioeconomic diversity has issued a broad set of recommendations designed to improve academic achievement and create a more inclusive and supportive campus climate for the benefit of all undergraduates.

Georgia State University Has a Record Number of Black First-Year Students

Georgia State University Has a Record Number of Black First-Year Students

This year there are 3,370 first-year undergraduate students at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Among this group are 1,344 African Americans, making up nearly 40 percent of the entering class.

Alice Simpkins Retires After 42 Years at Paine College in Augusta, Georgia

Alice Simpkins Retires After 42 Years at Paine College in Augusta, Georgia

In 1972, Simpkins was hired as a professional tutor at Paine College. She held the post of director of institutional research for more than a quarter century until her retirement this year.

 Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

UCLA Finds a Treasure Trove of African American History

UCLA Finds a Treasure Trove of African American History

Last fall, a collection of 365 audio tapes were found of speeches given at the University of California, Los Angeles between 1962 and 1973. Among the recording are a large number of speeches given by leaders of the civil rights movement.

Three Young Women From Africa Are MasterCard Foundation Scholars at Wellesley College

Three Young Women From Africa Are MasterCard Foundation Scholars at Wellesley College

Three young women from Africa make up the second cohort of MasterCard Foundation Scholars at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. They are among the 114 women from foreign nations in Wellesley’s first-year class.

Traveling Exhibit Showcases African American Academic Surgeons

Traveling Exhibit Showcases African American Academic Surgeons

The National Library of Medicine and the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture have developed an exhibit on the history of African American surgeons. The exhibit is appearing on campus across the United States and also online.

Clemson University's Year-Long Examination of Its History on Race

Clemson University’s Year-Long Examination of Its History on Race

The series, entitled “Race and the University: A Campus Conversation,” is designed to create greater awareness of Clemson’s history on the issue of race and to foster dialogue on diversity at the university today.

Soraya Coley Named the Next President of Cal Poly Pomona

Soraya Coley Named the Next President of Cal Poly Pomona

Soraya M. Coley was named as the next president of California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. She now serves as provost and vice president for academic affairs at California State University, Bakersfield.

A Blueprint for Advancing the Educational Success of Black Males

A Blueprint for Advancing the Educational Success of Black Males

A consortium of seven research centers on education have issued a report that offers an assessment of the educational status of African American males at all levels of education and offers recommendations on what can be done to improve their prospects for success.

U.S. News Names Its Choices for the Best HBCUs

U.S. News Names Its Choices for the Best HBCUs

As was the case last year, Spelman College in Atlanta was ranked as the nation’s best HBCU. Howard University in Washington, D.C., and Morehouse College in Atlanta held the second and third spots.

The African Cities That Send the Most Students to College in the United States

The African Cities That Send the Most Students to College in the United States

The report prepared by the Brookings Institution and JP Morgan Chase, found that the most students came from Lagos, Nigeria, which sent a total of 4,741 students to study in the United States. Nairobi, Kenya, ranked a close second.

The Next Chancellor of Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina

The Next Chancellor of Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina

Stacy Franklin Jones has spent the last several years as an independent consultant in Washington, D.C. She is the former provost and vice president for academic affairs at Bowie State University in Maryland.

Why Black Teens Join Gangs

Why Black Teens Join Gangs

A new study led by Dexter R. Voison, a professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago, identifies factors that lead to gang membership by young African American females.

Clark Atlanta University Sues the City of Atlanta Over Morris Brown College Land Deal

Clark Atlanta University Sues the City of Atlanta Over Morris Brown College Land Deal

Historically Black Clark Atlanta University has filed a lawsuit against the city of Atlanta claiming that the university had rights to land recently bought by the city from Morris Brown College.

Soccer Player at Syracuse University Suspended After Racial Rant Captured on Video

Soccer Player at Syracuse University Suspended After Racial Rant Captured on Video

A women’s soccer player at Syracuse University in New York was suspended from the team after a video surfaced showing her using racial slurs. The university is investigating the incident.

Four Black Scholars With Ties to Academia Win American Book Awards

Four Black Scholars With Ties to Academia Win American Book Awards

The Before Columbus Foundation of Oakland, California is honoring Emily Raboteau of CCNY, Jonathan Scott Holloway of Yale, Sterling Plumpp of the University of Illinois, Chicago, and Jamaica Kincaid of Claremont McKenna College.

Fort Valley States University Announces Plans to Deal With Budget Shortfall

Fort Valley States University Announces Plans to Deal With Budget Shortfall

President Ivelaw Griffith announced that the jobs of 14 staff members would be eliminated and 11 other positions that are currently vacant will not be filled. He also announced energy savings initiatives, changes in degree programs, and renewed marketing efforts to attract new students.

Roscoe Roberts Named General Counsel at the Univerity of Virginia

Roscoe Roberts Named General Counsel at the Univerity of Virginia

Earlier in his career, he served as legal counsel at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia State University in Petersburg, and Christopher Newport University in Newport News.

First Students Enroll in Johnson C. Smith University's Master of Social Work Degree Program

First Students Enroll in Johnson C. Smith University’s Master of Social Work Degree Program

The two-year degree program, which is offered in the evenings, allows students with full-time jobs the opportunity to enroll. There are 29 students in the inaugural class. Of the 29 students, 27 are women.

Six African Americans Taking on New Administrative Roles in Higher Education

Six African Americans Taking on New Administrative Roles in Higher Education

The new appointees are Claudia Donald at the University of Massachusetts, Damon R. Wade at Grambling State, LLJuna Weir at Alcorn State, Malika Roman Isler at Wake Forest, Clayton A. Gibson at Alabama A&M, and Steven E. Hairston at St. Augustine’s University.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

From time to time, The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. Here are the latest selections.

Ohio University President Gets Hefty Raise and $85,000 Bonus

Ohio University President Gets Hefty Raise and $85,000 Bonus

Since 2004, Roderick J. McDavis has been president of Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. He recently received an $85,000 bonus from the university’s board of trustees and an 8 percent salary increase. Dr. McDavis now makes $465,000 a year.

Athletics Director at Edward Waters College Retires

Athletics Director at Edward Waters College Retires

Johnny Rembert is retiring as director of athletics at Edward Waters College, the historically Black educational institution in Jacksonville, Florida. He was a member of the 1986 New England Patriots team that went to the Super Bowl.

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.