Archive for August, 2013

Dartmouth College Rescinds Appointment of Malawi Bishop

Dartmouth College Rescinds Appointment of Malawi Bishop

In July, Dartmouth College announced that James Tengatenga has been appointed dean of the William Jewett Tucker Foundation at the college. After Dr. Tengatenga’s past comments on homosexuality came to light, the college has decided not to go forward with the appointment.

Virginia Tech Appoints Two African Americans to Student Affairs Positions

Virginia Tech Appoints Two African Americans to Student Affairs Positions

Sharrika Davis was appointed interim director of multicultural programs and services and Byron Hughes was named interim director of fraternity and sorority life at the university.

New Ph.D. Program in Computer Science at North Carolina A&T State University

New Ph.D. Program in Computer Science at North Carolina A&T State University

North Carolina A&T State University, a historically Black educational institution in Greensboro, has received approval to begin a new Ph.D. program in computer science. The first students are expected to enroll in the program during the spring 2014 semester.

Texas Consortium Looks to Boost Educational Opportunities for Minority Men

Texas Consortium Looks to Boost Educational Opportunities for Minority Men

The University of Texas at Austin has launched the Texas Education Consortium for Male Students of Color, a new statewide network of public school districts, community colleges, and four-year public universities.

Two African American Women Win Academic Awards

Two African American Women Win Academic Awards

Crystal Sanders, an assistant professor of history at Penn State, won two awards for her doctoral dissertation on Black women in Mississippi and Sylvaia Schell of the University of Georgia was honored for her work to promote diversity in international education.

Howard University Nears Completion of Its "Water Is Life" Program in Kenya

Howard University Nears Completion of Its “Water Is Life” Program in Kenya

The Howard University chapter of Engineers Without Borders has completed a project in northwestern Kenya that will bring clean water to rural families in the area.

The New Chaplain at Xavier University of Louisiana

The New Chaplain at Xavier University of Louisiana

Etido Jerome is the new chaplain at Xavier University, a historically Black educational institution in New Orleans that is affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church.

Paul Quinn College to Offer a New Online Degree Program in Business Administration

Paul Quinn College to Offer a New Online Degree Program in Business Administration

Paul Quinn College, the historically Black educational institution in Dallas, has entered into an agreement to develop an online bachelor’s degree program in business administration. The program is expected to be offered during the spring 2014 semester.

Five African Americans Named to New Administrative Posts

Five African Americans Named to New Administrative Posts

The new appointees are Lowell Kent Davis at Western Carolina University, Stan Wilcox at Florida State University, Wayne Felder at Bowie State University, Bryan Samuels at the University of Chicago, and LaShonda Peebles of Chicago State University.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

From time to time, The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. Here are the latest selections.

White Student Union Established at Georgia State University

White Student Union Established at Georgia State University

According to the group’s website, The White Student Union will be “a place for like-minded White students to come together and not only celebrate their common European/Euro-American cultures, but to discuss issues that affect White people in the world today.”

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

University of Virginia Debuts an Online Archive of TV News Footage From the Civil Rights Era

University of Virginia Debuts an Online Archive of TV News Footage From the Civil Rights Era

The archive includes 20 years of news broadcasts from WSLS-TV in Roanoke during the period 1951 to 1971. According to the Library of Congress, only about 10 percent of the television news footage from this period has been saved.

The Successful First Cohort of the Rutgers Future Scholars Program

The Successful First Cohort of the Rutgers Future Scholars Program

Of the 183 students who began in the program five years ago, 163 will enter college this fall. Of the 163 college-bound students, 98 will be attending Rutgers University on full scholarships.

University of Hawaii Study Shows How Sleep Deprivation Impacts Racial Prejudice

University of Hawaii Study Shows How Sleep Deprivation Impacts Racial Prejudice

The results of the study of 400 undergraduate students at the University of Hawaii showed that the sleepier the test subject, the more likely they were to rate prospective job candidates with Black-sounding names unqualified for the position.

National Institutes of Health Reaches an Agreement With the Family of Henrietta Lacks

National Institutes of Health Reaches an Agreement With the Family of Henrietta Lacks

In 1951 Henrietta Lacks’ cancer cells were extracted for research without her knowledge. Researchers were able to keep her cancer cells alive and they continued to replicate in the laboratory. The so-called HeLa cells are still used in research today and have been used to make important scientific advances.

Study Finds That Minority Faculty at Community Colleges Feel Marginalized

Study Finds That Minority Faculty at Community Colleges Feel Marginalized

A report by the California Community College Collaborative at the University of California at Riverside finds that minority faculty members at community colleges feel marginalized and this causes them to limit what they contribute to their educational institution.

Millicent Lownes-Jackson Named Dean of the Business School at Tennessee State

Millicent Lownes-Jackson Named Dean of the Business School at Tennessee State

Dr. Lownes-Jackson has previously served the university as interim provost and executive vice president and associate dean of the College of Business.

Study Explores Reasons Behind Racial Differences in Breast Cancer Mortality

Study Explores Reasons Behind Racial Differences in Breast Cancer Mortality

The data showed that Black women were diagnosed with breast cancer later than White women. They also found that other health conditions such as diabetes or hypertension that were more prevalent in Black cancer patients may have been a factor in the higher mortality rates.

Saint Louis University Creates Chemistry Internship Program for Black Students

Saint Louis University Creates Chemistry Internship Program for Black Students

Saint Louis University in conjunction with the Jost Chemical Company have formed the Clyde Miller Career Academy in an effort to increase the number of minority students who develop an interest in the field of chemistry.

Leroy Keith Jr. Given the Title of President Emeritus of Morehouse College

Leroy Keith Jr. Given the Title of President Emeritus of Morehouse College

Leroy Keith Jr served as the eighth president of Morehouse College in Atlanta from 1987 to 1994. Now, nearly two decades after his retirement, the college’s board of trustees is bestowing on him the title of president emeritus.

University Project Creating a Database of Runaway Slave Advertisements

University Project Creating a Database of Runaway Slave Advertisements

Christian Friar, a student at the Mississippi University for Women, is spending the summer chronicling runaway slave advertisements in pre-Civil War newspapers from Alabama and Mississippi.

SUNY System Signs Partnership Agreement With the University of the West Indies

SUNY System Signs Partnership Agreement With the University of the West Indies

The State University of New York has entered into a partnership with the University of the West Indies to establish collaborative research projects and to facilitate faculty and student exchanges. The University of the West Indies has campuses in 16 countries in the Caribbean region.

University of Maryland Award Will Honor Sports Journalists Who Work for Racial Equality

University of Maryland Award Will Honor Sports Journalists Who Work for Racial Equality

The award is named for Sam Lacy and Wendell Smith, two African American journalists who documented Jackie Robinson’s effort to racially integrate Major League Baseball.

Thurgood Marshall College Fund Joins Forces With the Opportunity Funding Corporation

Thurgood Marshall College Fund Joins Forces With the Opportunity Funding Corporation

The Thurgood Marshall College Fund, a group representing 47 publicly operated historically Black colleges and universities, has merged with the Opportunity Funding Corporation, an organization fostering entrepreneurship in the African American community.

Two African American Scholars Named to Endowed Chairs

Two African American Scholars Named to Endowed Chairs

Allyson L. Watson was named to an endowed chair in urban education at Northeastern State University in Oklahoma and Joe M. Ricks Jr. was promoted to a named chair in the Division of Business at Xavier University in New Orleans.

Howard University Teams Up With Pearson to Offer Major New Online Program

Howard University Teams Up With Pearson to Offer Major New Online Program

Under the new agreement with educational publisher Pearson Inc., Howard will begin offering new online programs in the fall of 2014. The goal is to have 25 online courses available within the next several years.

Jackson State University's Edmund Merem Named Academic Editor of a Prestigious Journal

Jackson State University’s Edmund Merem Named Academic Editor of a Prestigious Journal

Edmund C. Merem, a professor in the Urban and Regional Planning Program in the School of Public Policy and Planning at Jackson State University in Mississippi, was named academic editor of the Journal of Advances in Research.

Physician Assistant Master's Program Debuts at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Physician Assistant Master’s Program Debuts at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore

In the new master’s degree program at UMES, students will spend 15 months of eight-hour days in the classroom and laboratory. They will then spend 12 months in clinical practice alongside licensed professionals.

Five African Americans in New Administrative Posts

Five African Americans in New Administrative Posts

The five taking on new responsibilities are Brenda Malone at the University of North Carolina, Lorraine Flemming at Howard University, Clevell Roseboro at Lincoln University, Ralph Johnson at Xavier University, and Turea Eriwon of Washington State University.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

From time to time, The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. Here are the latest selections.

In Memoriam: Julius LeVonne Chambers, 1936-2013

In Memoriam: Julius LeVonne Chambers, 1936-2013

Julius Chambers, a major figure in civil rights law, was the former chancellor of North Carolina Central University and the former director-counsel and president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund.

The New President of the American Counseling Association

The New President of the American Counseling Association

Cirecie West-Olatunji, associate professor and director of the Center for Traumatic Stress Research at the University of Cincinnati, has been elected president of the American Counseling Association, an organization with more than 43,000 members.

Changing of the Guard at Indiana University's Diversity Programs

Changing of the Guard at Indiana University’s Diversity Programs

Edwin C. Marshall, vice president for diversity equity, and multicultural affairs at Indiana University in Bloomington has retired. He has been replaced by James C. Wimbush, dean of the Graduate School and a professor at the university’s Kelley School of Business.