Archive for July, 2013

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

From time to time, The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. Here are the latest selections.

Bevlee Watford Is a Finalist for Vice Provost of Undergraduate Student Affairs at Virginia Tech

Bevlee Watford Is a Finalist for Vice Provost of Undergraduate Student Affairs at Virginia Tech

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg has announced three finalists for the position of vice provost for undergraduate student affairs. One of the three candidates, Bevlee Watford, is an African American.

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Berkeley Upgrades Its Multicultural Student Development Programs

Berkeley Upgrades Its Multicultural Student Development Programs

Gibor Basri, vice chancellor of equity and inclusion at Berkeley, stated that the main purpose of these programs is “to provide a place where students in these populations can find community and a safe space to talk about the challenges of being in that particular community.”

Marsha Horton to Lead the College of Education at Delaware State University

Marsha Horton to Lead the College of Education at Delaware State University

Dr. Horton was an associate professor and dean of the School of Education at Virginia Union University in Richmond. She will take on her new duties on August 19.

University of Missouri-Kansas City Names New Director of Black Studies Program

University of Missouri-Kansas City Names New Director of Black Studies Program

Adrienne Walker Hoard has been serving as professor of art and art education at the University of Missouri-Columbia. She previously taught at Ohio State University and Louisiana State University.

New Research Shows Value of Racial and Socioeconomic Diversity on Campus

New Research Shows Value of Racial and Socioeconomic Diversity on Campus

Researchers surveyed more than 15,000 students at 102 colleges and universities across the United States on their interactions with people of different races and economic backgrounds.

The New Dean of the Business School at Elizabeth City State University

The New Dean of the Business School at Elizabeth City State University

Kingsley Nwala was named dean of the Walter R. Davis School of Business and Economics at Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina. He had served as interim dean and was chair of two different departments at the business school.

Older Black Caribbeans and Older African Americans Have Different Rates of Depression

Older Black Caribbeans and Older African Americans Have Different Rates of Depression

The study of more than 2,000 American adults by researchers at Michigan State University found that Whites and Blacks of Caribbean descent experienced much higher rates of depression than African Americans.

Gordon May Named President of the Auburn Hills Campus of Oakland Community College

Gordon May Named President of the Auburn Hills Campus of Oakland Community College

He has been serving as interim president of the Auburn Hills campus since February and was also serving as president of the college’s Highland Lakes campus. He has been president of the Highland Lakes campus since 2002.

University Study Finds Racial Disparity in Survival Rates After Coronary Bypass Surgery

University Study Finds Racial Disparity in Survival Rates After Coronary Bypass Surgery

The data showed that for coronary bypass patients who also had peripheral artery disease, the average survival time for Whites was 9.5 years and for Blacks the average survival time was eight years.

Morehouse College Graduate Wins the Caine Prize for African Writing

Morehouse College Graduate Wins the Caine Prize for African Writing

Tope Folarin, a graduate of Morehouse College in Atlanta and a Rhodes Scholar, was honored for his short story entitled “Miracle,” about a blind healing prophet who pays a visit to an evangelical church in Texas.

Tennessee State University Enters Partnership for Research in Data Sciences

Tennessee State University Enters Partnership for Research in Data Sciences

Tennessee State University, the historically Black educational institution in Nashville, has announced that it has entered into a partnership agreement with Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro to develop strategic areas of research in data sciences.

Daniel Hastings to Lead the Singapore-MIT Alliance

Daniel Hastings to Lead the Singapore-MIT Alliance

Daniel Hastings, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics at MIT, was named director of the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART). He will serve a three-year term, beginning on January 1, 2014.

Ohio State Faculty and Students Are in Ethiopia Training Healthcare Professionals

Ohio State Faculty and Students Are in Ethiopia Training Healthcare Professionals

This summer the 20-member Ohio State contingent in Ethiopia will concentrate on educational efforts involving cervical cancer screening, rabies prevention, and improvements in food security and safety.

Jackson State University Is Now a Wireless Campus

Jackson State University Is Now a Wireless Campus

In the past there were wireless hotspots throughout campus buildings but the university wanted students to have access to the Internet wherever they were on campus, including outdoors areas, athletics fields, and stadiums.

Anglican Bishop of Southern Malawi to Lead Dartmouth's Tucker Foundation

Anglican Bishop of Southern Malawi to Lead Dartmouth’s Tucker Foundation

James Tengatenga has been appointed the Virginia Rice Kelsey ’61s Dean of the William Jewett Tucker Foundation at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. The foundation, established in 1951, supports the spiritual and moral efforts of the college community.

Wayne State University Law School to Take Part in New Civil Rights Clinic

Wayne State University Law School to Take Part in New Civil Rights Clinic

The American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan and the Wayne State University Law School are teaming up to establish the Civil Rights and Civil Liberties Clinic in Detroit.

University of California Agrees to Settle a Race Discrimination Lawsuit

University of California Agrees to Settle a Race Discrimination Lawsuit

Christian Head, an African American professor of surgery claimed that he was intentionally degraded based on his race and that UCLA officials ignored blatant acts of racial discrimination directed against him.

Paine College Establishes Its Own Police Department

Paine College Establishes Its Own Police Department

Previously, the campus in Augusta, Georgia, was patrolled by the Campus Safety Department. Now officers of the Paine College Police Department have arresting authority in the entire state of Georgia.

Williams College Scholar Wins Dissertation Prize

Williams College Scholar Wins Dissertation Prize

Candis Watt-Smith, an assistant professor of political science at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, has been selected to receive the Best Dissertation Award from the race and ethnic politics section of the American Political Science Association.

Three African Americans Taking on New Administrative Roles in Higher Education

Three African Americans Taking on New Administrative Roles in Higher Education

Taking on new roles are Hugh R. Page Jr. at the University of Notre Dame, Donald R. Pearsall at Winston-Salem State University, and Rust College’s Gemma D. Beckley.

In Memoriam: George Ebow Bonney, 1948-2013

In Memoriam: George Ebow Bonney, 1948-2013

Dr. Bonney, a native of Ghana, was a professor of community health and family medicine at Howard University and also served as director of the Statistical Genetics and Bioinformatics Unit at the National Human Genome Center.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

From time to time, The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. Here are the latest selections.

Leading With My Vitae

Leading With My Vitae

Dr. Candice Dowd Barnes details her efforts to gain her students’ respect and acknowledgment that she belonged in the front of the classroom.

Pedagogy and Trayvon Martin

Pedagogy and Trayvon Martin

Dr. Natasha C. Pratt-Harris explores how the Trayvon Martin case will impact her teaching this fall at Morgan State University.

Former HBCU Leaders Petition President Obama to Do More for Black Colleges

Former HBCU Leaders Petition President Obama to Do More for Black Colleges

The Alliance of Former Presidents and Chancellors of Historically Black Colleges and Universities is asking President Obama to take a more active role in strengthening the nation’s HBCUs.

Tuskegee University Marks the 100th Anniversary of Its Campus Hospital

Tuskegee University Marks the 100th Anniversary of Its Campus Hospital

Speaking at the ceremonies were relatives of Louis Rabb, the first administrator of the hospital, and John A. Kenney who came to Tuskegee in 1902 and served as the personal physician to Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver.

New Book Explores the Causes of the 1992 Race Riot in Los Angeles

New Book Explores the Causes of the 1992 Race Riot in Los Angeles

A new book by Brenda Stevenson, a professor of history at UCLA, makes the argument that the causes of the 1992 Los Angeles riots following the acquittal of police officers in the Rodney King case can be traced back to the March 1991 murder of a Black teenager by a Korean shopkeeper.

In Memoriam: Cecil L. Patterson, 1917-2013

In Memoriam: Cecil L. Patterson, 1917-2013

Holding master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Cecil Patterson joined the faculty at what is now North Carolina Central University in 1950 as an assistant professor of English. He taught there for 36 years.

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Judith Gay to Lead the Community College of Philadelphia

Judith Gay to Lead the Community College of Philadelphia

Dr. Gay has served as vice president for academic affairs at the college for the past 13 years. Previously, she served on the faculty at Montgomery County Community College, Chestnut Hill College, and Gettysburg College.

Three African Americans Presented With the National Medal of Arts

Three African Americans Presented With the National Medal of Arts

Ernest J. Gaines is the writer-in-residence emeritus at the University of Louisiana Lafayette. Joan Myers Brown is the founder of the Philadelphia School of Dance Arts and the Philadelphia Dance Company and Allen Toussaint is a New Orleans-born musician, composer, and record producer.

University of Rochester Study Finds Racial Disparity in Use of Pain Medicine in Emergency Rooms

University of Rochester Study Finds Racial Disparity in Use of Pain Medicine in Emergency Rooms

A new study by researchers at the University of Rochester found that Black, poor, and low-educated patients are less likely to receive pain medicines in hospital emergency rooms than White, high-income, and well-educated patients.