Archive for August, 2011

University Archaeologists Unearth African-American Village in Central Park

University Archaeologists Unearth African-American Village in Central Park

Students and faculty members in the archaeology department at Columbia University, New York University, and the City University of New York have found the remains of Seneca Village, a 19th century African-American settlement in what is now Central Park in New York City.

Langston University Responds to Politician’s Criticisms of Its Research Project

Langston University Responds to Politician’s Criticisms of Its Research Project

In the recent debate over the debt extension, Senator Tom Coburn of Oklahoma, issued a report on what he considered wasteful government spending. The report featured a U.S. Department of Agriculture grant that had been awarded to historically black Langston University in Oklahoma.

New Scholarly Journal on the Black Male Experience

Spectrum: The Journal on Black Men will be published twice a year, beginning in March.

Football Star Who Sends Inner-City Kids on College Tours Finds a New Home in Philadelphia

Football Star Who Sends Inner-City Kids on College Tours Finds a New Home in Philadelphia

Nnamdi Asomugha, the All-Pro defensive back, is the founder of Asomugha College Tours for Scholars. This foundation provides funds for low-income, inner-city youth to visit the nation’s best colleges and universities.

Historically Black Stillman College Ends Its Four-Year Nursing Program

Historically Black Stillman College Ends Its Four-Year Nursing Program

The decision came after the Alabama Board of Nursing issued a ruling that it no longer approved of the Stillman program.

Marshall University School of Medicine Seeks Minority Students

Marshall University School of Medicine Seeks Minority Students

Project PRE MED will invite black and other minority college students to campus for a weekend this October.

Harvard School of Public Health Fights AIDS in Tanzania

Harvard School of Public Health Fights AIDS in Tanzania

The Harvard School of Public Health in conjunction with the Tanzanian government has opened a new clinic in Dar es Salaam for AIDS patients.

Duke University School of Nursing Looks to Increase Diversity

Duke University School of Nursing Looks to Increase Diversity

This summer 10 undergraduate students participated in a six-week program at Duke University designed to increase the number of minorities in nursing.

Understanding Diversity in a Veterinary Medicine Setting

Understanding Diversity in a Veterinary Medicine Setting

Ronnie G. Elmore, associate dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University teaches a course, “Practicing Veterinary Medicine in a Multicultural Society.”

Record Number of Black Freshmen at the University of Georgia

Record Number of Black Freshmen at the University of Georgia

There are 5,500 freshman students this year, an increase of 10 percent from a year ago.

Langston University President to Step Down: Will Take Post at Hampton University

Langston University President to Step Down: Will Take Post at Hampton University

JoAnn W. Haysbert, president of Langston University in Oklahoma, has announced that she will step down at the end of the year. President Haysbert is the first woman to lead the historically black university. She has served as president for six years.

Pulitzer Prize Winner Cynthia Tucker Now Teaching at the University of Georgia

Pulitzer Prize Winner Cynthia Tucker Now Teaching at the University of Georgia

Tucker is leaving the Atlanta Journal-Constitution to serve as a visiting professor at the University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication.

In Memoriam: John Q. Taylor King Sr. (1921-2011)

John Q. Taylor King Sr., the longest-serving president of what is now Huston-Tillotson University in Austin, Texas, died earlier this month. He was 89 years old. A native of Memphis, King earned bachelor’s degrees at Fisk University and Huston-Tillotson. He held a master’s degree from DePaul University in Chicago and a Ph.D. in mathematics and […]

Appointments, Promotions, and Resignations

• Mercy Eyadiel was appointed executive director for employment development in the Office of Personal and Career Development at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. She was director of alumni and career services at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business. Previously she was the director of alumni relations and development at Vanderbilt University. • Charles […]

Honors and Awards

• Billy C. Hawkins, president of Talladega College in Alabama, received the Omega Century Award for Excellence at the centennial celebration of the Omega Psi Phi fraternity in Washington, D.C. Dr. Hawkins has been president at Talladega since 2008. Previously, he was president of Texas College. Dr. Hawkins is a graduate of Ferris State University in […]

Grants and Gifts

Grants and Gifts

• Historically black North Carolina A&T State University and North Carolina Central University are participating in a five-year, $25 million research project to understand and prevent noroviruses, the most common form of food-borne disease. About 5 million cases of norovirus disease are reported each year in the United States. The grant is the largest ever given […]

New Data on the Racial Gap in College Graduation Rates

The U.S. Department of Education recently released data on the success rate of the cohort of students who entered higher education in the fall of 2003.

The Racial Wealth Gap Is Growing: College Access for African Americans at Risk

A new study from the Pew Research Center shows that during the recent recession, the wealth gap has grown even wider.

Mark G. Hardy Named Provost at Jackson State University

Dr. Hardy has been serving as dean of the College of Science, Engineering, and Technology at Jackson State.

Historical Documents Relating to the African Americans of Chicago Will Be Made Available Online

The historical collections of 14 museums in the Chicago area will be digitized and made available online through what will be called the Chicago Portal.

Temple University Study Dispels the Stereotype of the Widespread Misuse of Prescription Drugs by Low-Income African Americans

Temple University Study Dispels the Stereotype of the Widespread Misuse of Prescription Drugs by Low-Income African Americans

New research from scholars at Temple University has found that the rate of borrowing prescription drugs in low-income groups is no greater than in other segments of the population.

Two Atlanta HBCUs Participating in Major Robotics Research

Two Atlanta HBCUs Participating in Major Robotics Research

Spelman College and Morehouse College are participating in a five-year, $18.5 million grant program to work on robotic devices that interface with the human nervous system.

Historically Black Dillard University and Texas Chiropractic College Form an Educational Alliance

Historically Black Dillard University and Texas Chiropractic College Form an Educational Alliance

Under the agreement, students will study for three years at Dillard University. Those that have performed up to academic standards will then transfer to Texas Chiropractic College for three additional years of study.

The Princeton Review’s Survey of Race Relations on Campus

The Princeton Review’s Survey of Race Relations on Campus

The schools that students said had a lot of interracial interaction were Loyola University of New Orleans, Stanford University, the University of Miami, Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, and the University of Alabama Birmingham.

Shaw University Chooses New Leader

Shaw University Chooses New Leader

Dorothy Cowser Yancy was named interim president of Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina.

In Memoriam

Melvin B. Tolson Jr., Richard David Morrison, and Oscar A. Rogers Jr. recently passed away.

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African-American Scholars

Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African-American Scholars

JBHE regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers.

Appointments, Promotions, and Resignations

• Esther S. Powell, director of nontraditional adult student services at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina, was elected vice president of the Alpha Sigma Lambda Society. The society which honors adult students who achieved high academic standards while maintaing responsibilities outside of academia, has more than 300 chapters nationwide. The society is headquartered at Eastern […]

Honors and Awards

• Alexander G. Clark Sr. was inducted posthumously into the Iowa African-American Hall of Fame. In 1867, more than 85 years before Brown v. Board of Education, Clark successfully filed suit to gain admittance of his daughter to the racially segregated public schools. He later successfully fought to have his son admitted to the law school […]

Grants and Gifts

• Historically black Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, is participating in a $900,000 U.S. Energy Department grant program with Wake Forest University. The researchers are developing crystals that can detect nuclear threats, radioactive materials, or chemical bombs more accurately and more cost-effectively than present detection methods. • The University of Illinois at Chicago received a five-year, $3 […]

Emory University Library Starts New Collection on African Americans in Sports

Emory University Library Starts New Collection on African Americans in Sports

The Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library at Emory University in Atlanta has established a new collection on African Americans in sports.

University of Utah to Offer Degree Program in Ethnic Studies

University of Utah to Offer Degree Program in Ethnic Studies

The Utah State Board of Regents has approved the establishment of a degree program in ethnic studies at the University of Utah.

Rodney S. Clark Named to Lead Attleboro Campus of Bristol Community College in Massachusetts

Rodney S. Clark was named dean of the Attleboro campus of Bristol Community College, based in Fall River, Massachusetts. Clark was dean of admissions at the college.

The Higher Education of the Nation’s Newest Black Judge

Wilma Lewis was recently confirmed as judge for the U.S. District Court in St. Thomas in the Virgin Islands. She is the first woman to serve as a federal district judge for the Virgin Islands.

Will Higher Standards for Bar Passage Rates for Graduates of U.S. Law Schools Lead to a Lower Level of Racial Diversity in the Legal Profession?

Will Higher Standards for Bar Passage Rates for Graduates of U.S. Law Schools Lead to a Lower Level of Racial Diversity in the Legal Profession?

The American Bar Association is considering a new proposal that would call for an 80 percent bar passage rate or a rate that is no more than 10 percentage points below that of other law schools in the state.

HBCUs Pitch In to Rebuild the State University of Haiti

HBCUs Pitch In to Rebuild the State University of Haiti

A group of 12 historically black colleges and universities has launched a campaign to raise $12 million to help rebuild the Université d’Etat d’Haïti (State University of Haiti), which was severely damaged by an earthquake in January 2010.