Research & Studies

Blacks at For-Profit Colleges: Poor Outcomes and Large Amounts of Debt

Blacks at For-Profit Colleges: Poor Outcomes and Large Amounts of Debt

Blacks make up a disproportionate percentage of students at for-profit schools and only 20 percent complete their degree programs. Many take on large amounts of debt that they can’t easily repay.

Study Calls for Anti-Poverty Programs Focused on the Very Young

Study Calls for Anti-Poverty Programs Focused on the Very Young

A new report from the Center for American Progress recommends that in order to best deal with issues of economic inequality, the United States should refocus social policy on programs for infants and toddlers.

Study Finds Declining Support for Diversity Among Whites Who Are Informed of Demographic Trends

Study Finds Declining Support for Diversity Among Whites Who Are Informed of Demographic Trends

A study by psychologists at the University of California, Los Angeles, finds declining support for multiculturalism and diversity among Whites who were informed that they will no longer be a majority of the population by 2050.

The African-Born U.S. Population Is a Highly Educated Group

The African-Born U.S. Population Is a Highly Educated Group

A new Census Bureau study finds that more than 40 percent of the African-born U.S. population has graduated from a four-year college, compared to 28 percent of the total foreign-born population, and 29 percent of the entire U.S. adult population.

A Holistic Admission Process Produces Better Results for Health Profession Schools

A Holistic Admission Process Produces Better Results for Health Profession Schools

A holistic admissions process that takes into account more than an applicant’s grades and test scores, achieves an entering class that is more diverse and in most cases there is no change in measures of academic quality, student academic performance, or student retention.

University Study Links Racial Discrimination to Mental Health Problems

University Study Links Racial Discrimination to Mental Health Problems

The study found that African Americans and Caribbean-born Blacks who experience discrimination in the United States are at a substantially higher risk for anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and other mental disorders.

Study Questions Effectiveness of Online Science Courses for African Americans

Study Questions Effectiveness of Online Science Courses for African Americans

A new study led by researchers at Clemson University finds that African American students enrolled in traditional on-campus classroom courses in the sciences had greater academic success than Black students enrolled in online courses in the sciences.

The Importance of HBCUs in Producing Black Doctorates in STEM Fields

The Importance of HBCUs in Producing Black Doctorates in STEM Fields

More than one third of African Americans who hold a Ph.D. in a STEM field earned their undergraduate degree at a historically Black college of university.

University of Wyoming Project Seeks to Map Racial Prejudice in the United States

University of Wyoming Project Seeks to Map Racial Prejudice in the United States

A group of graduate students in psychology at the University of Wyoming hopes to construct a map which shows where prejudice is most prevalent. They are trying to raise money online to finance their research.

Survey Finds Large Racial Differences in Student Loan Debt

Survey Finds Large Racial Differences in Student Loan Debt

According to the Gallup survey, only 22 percent of Black students who graduated college in the 2000-to-2014 period did so without any student loan debt. Half of all Black students who earned their degree in the period had student loan debt of more than $25,000.

A Check on the Status of Black Enrollments in U.S. Graduate Schools

A Check on the Status of Black Enrollments in U.S. Graduate Schools

The Council on Graduate Schools reports that 40,584 African Americans enrolled in graduate programs for the first time in the fall of 2013. Of these, 69 percent were women.

New Report Offers Strategies for Increasing Internationalization Efforts at HBCUs

New Report Offers Strategies for Increasing Internationalization Efforts at HBCUs

Over an 18-month period, the American Council on Education worked closely with seven HBCUs to conduct a review and analysis of their current internationalization efforts and to develop a strategic plan for enhancing those efforts.

Study Finds That Racial Gap in College Completion Rates Is Attributable to Pre-College Factors

Study Finds That Racial Gap in College Completion Rates Is Attributable to Pre-College Factors

The results found that college graduation rates are largely determined by what happened before college — such as family resources, academic preparation and community context — and that the key non-college factors may well differ for communities of color.

University Study Finds Small Progress in Racial Integration of Church Congregations

University Study Finds Small Progress in Racial Integration of Church Congregations

New research shows that in 1998, 20 percent of all churchgoers were members of all-White congregations. The latest data shows that only 11 percent of all church goers belong to all-White congregations. The study found no increase in ethnic diversity in predominantly Black congregations.

Black Couples in Committed Relationships Are Healthier, Regardless of Marital Status

Black Couples in Committed Relationships Are Healthier, Regardless of Marital Status

A study conducted at the University of Georgia finds that Black couples in committed relationships – regardless of marital status – are healthier than other African Americans. But Blacks who had a committed partner of another race were not healthier than single African Americans.

A Blueprint for Advancing the Educational Success of Black Males

A Blueprint for Advancing the Educational Success of Black Males

A consortium of seven research centers on education have issued a report that offers an assessment of the educational status of African American males at all levels of education and offers recommendations on what can be done to improve their prospects for success.

The African Cities That Send the Most Students to College in the United States

The African Cities That Send the Most Students to College in the United States

The report prepared by the Brookings Institution and JP Morgan Chase, found that the most students came from Lagos, Nigeria, which sent a total of 4,741 students to study in the United States. Nairobi, Kenya, ranked a close second.

Why Black Teens Join Gangs

Why Black Teens Join Gangs

A new study led by Dexter R. Voison, a professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago, identifies factors that lead to gang membership by young African American females.

Interactive Teaching in College Science Classes Can Close the Racial Achievement Gap

Interactive Teaching in College Science Classes Can Close the Racial Achievement Gap

A new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Washington finds that “active learning” techniques in science courses in college classrooms help all students, but have particular benefits for African Americans.

Brain Scan Study Finds Humans Are Not That Concerned About Inequity

Brain Scan Study Finds Humans Are Not That Concerned About Inequity

In a study by scientists at Georgia State University, MRIs of the subjects’ brains showed that subjects were strongly influenced by their self-interest and did not protest outcomes that were inherently unfair to other participants.

New University Study Offers Hope for Children Suffering From Sickle Cell Disease

New University Study Offers Hope for Children Suffering From Sickle Cell Disease

Sickle cell disease affects about 100,000 people in the United States and occurs most commonly in African-Americans. New research finds that monthly blood transfusions can reduce the incidence of strokes in children with sickle cell disease.

Survey Shows Black Faculty at the University of Missouri Are Less Satisfied Than Their White Peers

Survey Shows Black Faculty at the University of Missouri Are Less Satisfied Than Their White Peers

Only 57 percent of faculty of color said that they were “very satisfied” or “satisfied” with the jobs. Nearly one fifth of all faculty of color said they were “dissatisfied” or “very dissatisfied.”

Does Racism Contribute to Higher Rates of Obesity Among Blacks?

Does Racism Contribute to Higher Rates of Obesity Among Blacks?

A new study led by Luis Rivera, an experimental social psychologist at Rutgers University-Newark, finds that exposure to racial and ethnic stereotypes can hinder members of minority groups in their efforts to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Parents' Job Loss Can Increase Suicide Behaviors Among Black Adolescents and Teenagers

Parents’ Job Loss Can Increase Suicide Behaviors Among Black Adolescents and Teenagers

A study led by researchers at Duke University finds that when mass layoffs occur in the general population, there is a corresponding rise in suicide-related behaviors among African American adolescents and teenagers in the area where the layoffs occurred.

Number of Black Applicants to U.S. Graduate Schools From Africa on the Rise

Number of Black Applicants to U.S. Graduate Schools From Africa on the Rise

A new report from the Council on Graduate Schools shows that the number of foreign applicants to U.S. graduate schools in 2014 from Africa increased by 9 percent from a year ago. Black acceptances were up 3 percent.

Report Finds That Tensions Between Black Youth and the Police Are a Nationwide Problem

Report Finds That Tensions Between Black Youth and the Police Are a Nationwide Problem

The report from the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago finds that 54.5 percent of Black youth report being harassed by the police. This is nearly double the rate for youth from other racial and ethnic groups.

University Study Finds Inner-City Youth More Likely to Have Food Allergies

University Study Finds Inner-City Youth More Likely to Have Food Allergies

The study found that 10 percent of young inner-city children had food allergies. Peanut allergies were the most common, followed by eggs, and milk. Nationwide about 3 percent of all adults and 6 percent of young children have food allergies.

University of Cincinnati Sociologist Finds Racial Wage Gap Remains for Highly Educated Workers

University of Cincinnati Sociologist Finds Racial Wage Gap Remains for Highly Educated Workers

The study followed a large, multiracial group of eighth graders in 1988 through the year 2000 when most of the participants were 25 years old. When educational and other factors were the same, a racial wage gap of more than $5,700 still existed.

Whites' Support of Prison Reform Depends on Their Perception of the Black Prison Population

Whites’ Support of Prison Reform Depends on Their Perception of the Black Prison Population

A new study by psychologists at Stanford University finds that when White Americans are informed about the disproportionate number of African Americans in prisons, they are less likely to support prison reform.

A Report Card on Racial Diversity in College Sports

A Report Card on Racial Diversity in College Sports

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida reports that the overall grade for racial hiring practices at colleges and universities rose from 81 points in 2012 to 82.3 points in 2013.

Maintaining Diversity in the Admissions Office Will Be a Challenge

Maintaining Diversity in the Admissions Office Will Be a Challenge

Blacks are underrepresented in the top management levels of admissions offices at U.S. colleges and universities. And a new survey finds that a large percentage of current Black admissions officers want to find jobs in other fields.

Using Monetary Incentives to Improve the Diet of Low-Income Families

Using Monetary Incentives to Improve the Diet of Low-Income Families

A new study led by researchers at New York University finds that vouchers good for fruit and vegetables at farmers’ markets in urban areas can significantly improve the diets of low-income minority families.

Academic Study Finds a Large Racial Gap in the Transition Out of Homeownership

Academic Study Finds a Large Racial Gap in the Transition Out of Homeownership

Researchers at Rice University in Houston and Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, found that since the 1990s, African American homebuyers were 45 percent more likely than Whites to transition out of homeownership.

Minority Students at Public Charter Schools Less Likely to Engage in Risky Behaviors

Minority Students at Public Charter Schools Less Likely to Engage in Risky Behaviors

The study examined a group of nearly 1,000 students, about half of them who were admitted by lottery to public charter schools and half who were not. The ones admitted to the charter schools were significantly less likely to engage in risky behaviors.

Black Physician Leading the First Phase III Clinical Trial for a Preeclampsia Drug

Black Physician Leading the First Phase III Clinical Trial for a Preeclampsia Drug

Alan Tita is a professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Alabama Birmingham. He is a lead investigator for the clinical trial for a drug that may reduce infant and maternal mortality rates.

Blacks Making No Progress in Physics Faculty

Blacks Making No Progress in Physics Faculty

In 2012, Blacks were 2.1 percent of all physics faculty members at U.S. colleges and universities, down from 2.2 percent in 2008. Half of all Black physics faculty are at historically Black colleges and universities.