Appointments

Three Scholars Honored for Their Kentucky African American Encyclopedia

Three Scholars Honored for Their Kentucky African American Encyclopedia

There are more than 1,000 entries in the encyclopedia detailing African American history from frontier days to the present time. More than 150 scholars contributed to the entries in the volume.

Cornelius Carter Appointed to an Endowed Chair at the University of Alabama

Cornelius Carter Appointed to an Endowed Chair at the University of Alabama

Professor Carter, who holds a a master of fine arts degree in dance from the University of Hawaii at Manoa, also serves as director of the dance program at the University of Alabama and as artistic director of the Alabama Repertory Dance Theatre.

Honors for Two African American Women Scholars

Honors for Two African American Women Scholars

Goulda A. Downer, an assistant professor in the College of Medicine at Howard University in Washington, D.C., was honored by the Institute of Caribbean Studies and Alcorn State University has renamed its Fine Arts Building to honor long-time faculty member Joyce J. Bolden.

The New Chief Diversity Officer at Empire State College in New York

The New Chief Diversity Officer at Empire State College in New York

Elliott Dawes has been named the inaugural chief diversity officer for institutional equity and inclusion at Empire State College in Saratoga Springs, New York, a campus of the State University of New York System. He will be based in the college’s New York City offices.

Walter Massey Is the New Chair of the Giant Magellan Telescope Project

Walter Massey Is the New Chair of the Giant Magellan Telescope Project

Poised to be the first of a new generation of extremely large telescopes, the Giant Magellan Telescope will be the largest optical telescope in the world when it comes online in 2022. Walter Massey is the former president of Morehouse College and currently serves as chancellor of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Wake Forest University Names a Campus Building to Honor Maya Angelou

Wake Forest University Names a Campus Building to Honor Maya Angelou

Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, announced that its newest residence hall will be named to honor Maya Angelou, who served on the faculty at the university from 1982 until her death in 2014. The building will be the first on the Wake Forest campus to be named for an African American.

Five Black Professors Receive New Teaching Assignments

Five Black Professors Receive New Teaching Assignments

Taking on new teaching roles are Craig S. Wilder at MIT, Stacy-Ann January at the University of South Carolina, Wonder Drake at Vanderbilt University, Joseph Ravenell at New York University, and Marlon James at Macalester College in Minnesota.

Three Black Scholars Honored With Prestigious Awards

Three Black Scholars Honored With Prestigious Awards

The honorees are Gilda Barabino dean of the School of Engineering at City College of New York, Karla Smith Fuller of Guttman Community College in New York City, and Yacob Astatke of the School of Engineering at Morgan State University in Baltimore.

New Administrative Roles for Four African Americans in Higher Education

New Administrative Roles for Four African Americans in Higher Education

Taking on new administrative duties are Patrick Harold Johnson at Meharry Medical College, Shontay Delalue at Brown University, Kenneth Huewitt at Texas Southern University, and Barry L. Wells at Syracuse University.

Four African American Men Appointed to Key Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Four African American Men Appointed to Key Administrative Posts in Higher Education

The appointees are Rick Daniels at Rock Valley College in Illinois, Raphael X. Moffett at Texas Southern University in Houston, Jack Thomas of Western Illinois University in Macomb, and Peter Edmund Millet at Meharry Medical College.

Rutgers University Scholar Wins Prestigious Literary Award

Rutgers University Scholar Wins Prestigious Literary Award

John Keene, associate professor of English and chair of the African and African American studies department at the Newark campus of Rutgers University in New Jersey, has been chosen as the recipient of the 2016 Lannan Literary Award for fiction.

University of Delaware Professor Honored by the Association of Black Women Historians

University of Delaware Professor Honored by the Association of Black Women Historians

Erica Armstrong Dunbar, the Blue and Gold Professor of Black American Studies and History at the University of Delaware, is the winner of the Lorraine A. Williams Leadership Award from the Association of Black Women Historians.

New Roles for Two Black Faculty Members at Major Universities

New Roles for Two Black Faculty Members at Major Universities

Kelechi C. Ogbonna, an assistant professor in the School of Pharmacy at Virginia Commonwealth University, was named associate dean for admissions and student services and Jennifer Richeson was appointed the Philip R. Allen Professor of Psychology at Yale University.

Three Black Women Scholars Presented With Notable Awards

Three Black Women Scholars Presented With Notable Awards

The honorees are Phyllis Sharps of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Vievee Francis of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, and Megan Covington of Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, North Carolina.

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for Three African Americans

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for Three African Americans

Darin A. Latimore was appointed deputy dean for diversity and inclusion at the Yale School of Medicine. Joi Cunningham was promoted to assistant vice president for human resources at Oakland University and Taffye Benson Clayton was named vice president for inclusion and diversity at Auburn University.

Wesleyan University's First Core Faculty Members in African American Studies

Wesleyan University’s First Core Faculty Members in African American Studies

In the past, faculty members who taught courses in African American studies were members of established academic departments on campus. Now the university has hired the first two core faculty members of its African American studies program that was recently granted departmental status.

Marilyn Nelson Wins the $25,000 Neustadt Prize for Children's Literature

Marilyn Nelson Wins the $25,000 Neustadt Prize for Children’s Literature

Marilyn Nelson is a professor emerita at the University of Connecticut. Professor Nelson is a winner of the Pushcart Prize and has been a finalist for the National Book Award three times. From 2001 to 2006, Dr. Nelson was the poet laureate of the state of Connecticut.

Four African Americans in New Administrative Posts in Higher Education

Four African Americans in New Administrative Posts in Higher Education

The new appointees are Anthony Berryhill at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, Sonia Rankin at the University of New Mexico, Larry D. Johnson at St. Louis Community College, and Ronald Anthony Milon at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City.

The University of Virginia Honors the Late Julian Bond With an Endowed Chair

The University of Virginia Honors the Late Julian Bond With an Endowed Chair

Professor Bond, who was a civil rights pioneer and led the NAACP for 12 years, taught at the University of Virginia for 20 years. He was a founding member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the first president of the Southern Poverty Law Center, and served in the Georgia State legislature for 20 years.

Kimberlé Crenshaw to Receive the Gittler Prize From Brandeis University

Kimberlé Crenshaw to Receive the Gittler Prize From Brandeis University

The Gittler Prize is presented annually to a person whose body of published work reflects scholarly excellence and makes a lasting contribution to racial, ethnic or religious relations. Professor Crenshaw, who is on the faculty at the law schools of Columbia University and UCLA, will receive the award and a $25,000 prize in October 2017.

Three African Americans Appointed to New Faculty Positions

Three African Americans Appointed to New Faculty Positions

La Tanya Hall is teaching jazz voice at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music in Ohio. Michele Foster was named to an endowed chair at the University of Louisville and Jason Geary is the new director of the School of Music at the University of Maryland.

Honors and Awards for Three African American Scholars

Honors and Awards for Three African American Scholars

James Rosser is having a building named in his honor at California State University, Los Angeles. Playwright Ntozake Shange will receive the Langston Hughes Medal from the City College of New York, and Adriel Hilton of Webster University was honored by the South Carolina College Personnel Association.

A Trio of Black Men in New Administrative Roles in Higher Education

A Trio of Black Men in New Administrative Roles in Higher Education

Taking on new administrative duties are Kelechi C. Ogbonna at the School of Pharmacy at Virginia Commonwealth University, Darron Turner at Texas Christian University, and Jermaine Whirl at Greenville Technical College in South Carolina.

Five Finalists Announced for the Inaugural Harriet Tubman Prize

Five Finalists Announced for the Inaugural Harriet Tubman Prize

The award, presented by the Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture of the New York Public Library, recognizes the best book of the year on slavery, the slave trade, or anti-slavery topics.

University of Chicago to Honor Its First Black Woman Doctoral Degree Recipient

University of Chicago to Honor Its First Black Woman Doctoral Degree Recipient

Georgiana Simpson enrolled at the University of Chicago in 1907 at the age of 41. Her presence of campus was protested by students from the South. But Simpson persisted and went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in 1911 and a Ph.D. in 1921.

New Faculty Assignments for a Trio of Black Scholars

New Faculty Assignments for a Trio of Black Scholars

Taking on new roles are Keisha Bentley-Edwards at the Duke University School of Medicine, Cedric Merlin Powell at the University of Louisville, and Catherine Knight Steele at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Notable Honors for Two African American Academics

Notable Honors for Two African American Academics

The honorees are Robert Nobles, associate vice chancellor for research at the University of Tennessee, and Renee Kirby, associate director of disability resources and services at Temple University in Philadelphia.

New Administrative Assignments in Higher Education for Four African Americans

New Administrative Assignments in Higher Education for Four African Americans

Appointed to new administrative positions are Rolundus Rice at Lincoln University in Missouri, Camille Kluttz-Leach at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina, Rachel Vassel at Syracuse University in New York, and Marc A. Newman at Grambling State University in Louisiana.

Five African Americans Join the Vanderbilt University Faculty

Five African Americans Join the Vanderbilt University Faculty

Thew new Vanderbilt University faculty members are Jada Been Torres in anthropology, Brandon Byrd in history, Nicole M. Joseph in education, Sharece Thrower in political science, and Duane Watson in psychology and human development.

New Faculty Roles for Six African Americans in Higher Education

New Faculty Roles for Six African Americans in Higher Education

Here is this week’s listing of Black faculty members from colleges and universities throughout the United States who have been appointed to new positions or have been assigned new duties.

A Long Overdue Tribute to the First Black Woman to Graduate from the Yale School of Music

A Long Overdue Tribute to the First Black Woman to Graduate from the Yale School of Music

Helen Eugenia Hagan graduated from the Yale School of Music in 1912. She went on to a long career as a concert pianist and an educator. She died in 1964 but until recently her remains were buried in an unmarked grave in New Haven’s Evergreen Cemetery.

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for Four African Americans

New Administrative Posts in Higher Education for Four African Americans

The appointees are Marco Barker at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah, George Johnson Sr. at Claflin University in Orangeburg, South Carolina, Joseph Michael Green at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and Joanna N. Ravello at the University of Rhode Island.

Yale University Honors Its First Black Student

Yale University Honors Its First Black Student

James W.C. Pennington took classes at Yale Divinity School beginning in 1834. He was not allowed to enroll but could audit courses from the back of classrooms. Pennington could not participate in classroom discussions and he was not allowed to take out books from the library.

Edward B. Marable Named to a Dean Position at the Seton Hall University School of Law

Edward B. Marable Named to a Dean Position at the Seton Hall University School of Law

Marable was serving as a principal investigator and a deputy public defender for the state of New Jersey. He also was a practicing attorney specializing in child welfare issues.

New Administrative Posts for Five African Americans in Higher Education

New Administrative Posts for Five African Americans in Higher Education

Appointed to new administrative positions are Kathy Y. Time at Florida A&M University, Adriel A. Hilton at Webster University, Ulicia Lawrence-Oladeinde at Temple University, Edward Scott at Morgan State University and Jessie Brooks at Spelman College.

Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors to Honor Dillard University President

Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors to Honor Dillard University President

Walter M. Kimbrough, the seventh president of Dillard University in New Orleans, Louisiana, has been selected to receive the Dr. Kent L. Gardner Award from the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors.